Freshwater Action Network
– grassroots influencing on water and sanitation

Guide pour le secteur de l'eau

Here is a list of key targets for influence as well as a list of other non for profit organisations working on water and sanitation issues that could be approached for partnering on your advocacy activities.

Targets for influence

 Download a comprehensive briefing on key institutions

 

 

African Development Bank Group

http://www.afdb.org/en

The African Development Bank (AfDB) Group’s mission is to help reduce poverty, improve living conditions for Africans and mobilize resources for the continent’s economic and social development. With this objective in mind, the institution aims at assisting African countries – individually and collectively - in their efforts to achieve sustainable economic development and social progress. Combating poverty is at the heart of the continent’s efforts to attain sustainable economic growth. To this end, the Bank seeks to stimulate and mobilize internal and external resources to promote investments as well as provide its regional member countries with technical and financial assistance.

The institution’s greatest assets are its human resources which come from a wide geographic area. The Bank is an equal opportunity employer and firmly believes that recruitment from a wide geographical and cultural spectrum enriches the institution with varied talents, experiences and skills that will enhance the quality of human resources management and ultimately the realization of the Bank’s mission of reducing poverty across the continent.

In accordance with its policy of decentralization aimed at taking its operations closer to its beneficiaries, the Bank has, over the past few years, established about 23 field and country offices across the continent.

Objectives

The overarching objective of the African Development Bank (AfDB) Group is to spur sustainable economic development and social progress in its regional member countries (RMCs), thus contributing to poverty reduction.

The Bank Group achieves this objective by:

  • Mobilizing and allocating resources for investment in RMCs; and
  • Providing policy advice and technical assistance to support development efforts.

Budget

  • Authorized Capital at December 31, 2008 Unit of Accounts (UA) 21.87 billion
  • Subscribed Capital at December 31, 2008 UA 21.77 billion
  • Paid-up Capital at December 31, 2008 UA 2.36 billion
  • Total Cumulative Approvals, 1967–2008 3,276 loans and grants totaling UA 44.75 billion

 

The ADF, the concessional window of the African Development Bank (AfDB) Group, successfully concluded in December 2007 its 11th Resource Replenishment (ADF-11) for the Fund’s activity in 2008-2010. For such period, ADF Deputies agreed on a record level of UA5.9 billion. The Fund’s core strategic priorities for ADF-11 are infrastructure, governance, fragile states and regional integration.

Promotion in the Water Sector

The Bank Group has, since 1968, sought to finance non-project operations, including structural adjustment loans, policy-based reforms and various forms of technical assistance and policy advice. The AfDB Group has also widened the scope of its activities to cover new initiatives such as the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD), water and sanitation as well as HIV/AIDS.

The overriding objective of the AfDB is to improve living conditions on the continent through various initiatives.

For example, Africa has the lowest water resources development level, with only 4% of its annual resources invested in water. Nearly 40% of the cultivated areas are irrigated and the energy potential is virtually untapped. The management and development of water resources are among the most crucial issues facing Africa.

To take up these enormous challenges on the continent, the AfDB has led many water-related activities. The most important include the AfDB Rural Water Supply and Sanitation (RWSSI) which will grant access to an extra 33 million people to safe drinking water and sanitation by 2010. The Bank also participates in other major initiatives such as the African Water Facility (AWF) and the NEPAD’s Water and Sanitation Programme.

 

 

FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)

http://www.fao.org

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations leads international efforts to defeat hunger. Serving both developed and developing countries, FAO acts as a neutral forum where all nations meet as equals to negotiate agreements and debate policy. FAO is also a source of knowledge and information. We help developing countries and countries in transition modernize and improve agriculture, forestry and fisheries practices and ensure good nutrition for all. Since our founding in 1945, we have focused special attention on developing rural areas, home to 70 percent of the world's poor and hungry people.

Objectives

Achieving food security for all is at the heart of FAO's efforts - to make sure people have regular access to enough high-quality food to lead active, healthy lives.

FAO's mandate is to raise levels of nutrition, improve agricultural productivity, better the lives of rural populations and contribute to the growth of the world economy.

FAO provides the kind of behind-the-scenes assistance that helps people and nations help themselves. If a community wants to increase crop yields but lacks the technical skills, we introduce simple, sustainable tools and techniques. When a country shifts from state to private land ownership, we provide the legal advice to smooth the way. When a drought pushes already vulnerable groups to the point of famine, we mobilize action. And in a complex world of competing needs, we provide a neutral meeting place and the background knowledge needed to reach consensus.

Budget

FAO’s Regular Programme budget is funded by its members, through contributions set at the FAO Conference. The FAO budget for the biennium 2008-2009 is US$929.8 million, adjusted to the Euro/US dollar exchange rate fixed by the FAO Conference. The budget covers core technical work, cooperation and partnerships including the Technical Cooperation Programme, information and general policy, direction and administration

Promotion in the Water Sector

FAO Natural Resources Management and Environment department focuses in ensuring adequate food and water to all and achieving sustainable rural development and livelihoods for current and future generations all hinge upon the responsible management of natural resources.

 

 

 

FAO Water

http://www.fao.org/nr/water/what.html

In the face of increasing water scarcity, and the dominance of agricultural water use, FAO is in the forefront to enhance global agricultural performance while promoting the sustainability of water use for food production.

The Water Development and Management Unit (NRLW) is engaged in a programmatic approach to agricultural water management addressing water use efficiency and productivity, and best practices for water use and conservation, throughout the continuum from water sources to final uses.

Specific targets are integrated water resources management, water harvesting, groundwater, use of non-conventional water, modernization of irrigation systems, on-farm water management, water-quality management, agriculture-wetlands interactions, drought impact mitigation, institutional capacities, national water strategies and policies, river basin and transboundary waters management.

NRLW collaborates with all other technical departments of FAO in order to generate a coherent and comprehensive FAO-Water programme effectively contributing to the achievement of the related Millennium Development Goals.

With its continually updated water information system AQUASTAT, and tools for analysis such as CROPWAT, AQUACROP and MASSCOTE, NRLW is able to contribute in the formulation of national and regional water management strategies and perspective studies.

 

 

Global Water Partnership (GWP)

http://www.gwpforum.org/servlet/PSP

The Global Water Partnership's vision is for a water secure world. Its mission is to support the sustainable development and management of water resources at all levels.

GWP was founded in 1996 by the World Bank, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), and the Swedish International Development Agency (SIDA) to foster integrated water resource management (IWRM), and to ensure the coordinated development and management of water, land, and related resources by maximising economic and social welfare without compromising the sustainability of vital environmental systems. During the past 12 years, the GWP Network has become active in 13 regions and over 70 countries.

The network is open to all organisations involved in water resources management: developed and developing country government institutions, agencies of the United Nations, bi- and multi-lateral development banks, professional associations, research institutions, non-governmental organisations, and the private sector.

 

 

 

International Monetary Fund (IMF)

http://www.imf.org/external/index.htm

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is an organization of 186 countries, working to foster global monetary cooperation, secure financial stability, facilitate international trade, promote high employment and sustainable economic growth, and reduce poverty around the world.

Objective

Through its economic surveillance, the IMF keeps track of the economic health of its member countries, alerting them to risks on the horizon and providing policy advice. It also lends to countries in difficulty, and provides technical assistance and training to help countries improve economic management. This work is backed by IMF research and statistics

The IMF collaborates with the World Bank, the regional development banks, the World Trade Organization (WTO), UN agencies, and other international bodies. While all of these organizations are involved in global economic issues, each has its own unique areas of responsibility and specialization. The IMF also interacts with think tanks, civil society, and the media on a daily basis.

Promotion in the Water Sector

The IMF and the World Bank are different, but complement each other's work. Whereas the IMF's focus is chiefly on macroeconomic and financial sector issues, the World Bank is concerned mainly with longer-term development and poverty reduction. Its loans finance infrastructure projects, the reform of particular sectors of the economy, and broader structural reforms. Countries must join the IMF to be eligible for World Bank membership.

 

 


UN Habitat  

http://www.unhabitat.org

The United Nations Human Settlements Programme, UN-HABITAT, is the United Nations agency for human settlements. It is mandated by the UN General Assembly to promote socially and environmentally sustainable towns and cities with the goal of providing adequate shelter for all.

Objective

UN-HABITAT's programmes are designed to help policy-makers and local communities get to grips with the human settlements and urban issues and find workable, lasting solutions. UN-HABITAT's work is directly related to the United Nations Millennium Declaration, particularly the goals of member States to improve the lives of at least 100 million slum dwellers by the year 2020, Target 11, Millennium Development Goal No. 7, and Target 10 which calls for the reduction by half of the number without sustainable access to safe drinking water

Budget

The Fund was started with one million US dollars advanced from the Housing and Human Settlements Foundation. UN-HABITAT signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Government of Canada committing US$11.3million to the Trust Fund. The donor community has responded impressively with generous contributions. Other countries donating funds have included the Governments of Sweden US$3.3million, the Government of Norway US$10million, The Netherlands, US$22.9 million, with US$14.9million going towards the Lake Victoria Water and Sanitation Initiative.

Promotion in the Water Sector

The highest priority for UN-HABITAT's Water and Sanitation programme is improving access to safe water and helping provide adequate sanitation to millions of low-income urban dwellers and measuring that impact.

UN-HABITAT's Water and Sanitation programme is funded by a Water and Sanitation Trust Fund. Its main focus is improving delivery of water and sanitation in African Asia through its regional programmes, Water for African Cities and Water for Asian Cities, and promoting policy dialogue, information exchange, water education and awareness raising. It also monitors progress towards achieving the Millennium Development Goal targets on improving access to safe water and sanitation and undertakes replicable model-setting initiatives, notably the Lake Victoria Region Water and Sanitation and Mekong Regional Water and Sanitation initiatives.

 

 

 

United Nations Commission for Sustainable Development (UNCSD)

http://www.un.org/esa/dsd/index.shtml

The Division for Sustainable Development (DSD) provides leadership and is an authoritative source of expertise within the United Nations system on sustainable development. It promotes sustainable development as the substantive secretariat to the UN Commission on Sustainable Development (CSD) and through technical cooperation and capacity building at international, regional and national levels. The context for the Division's work is the implementation of Agenda 21, the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation and the Barbados Programme of Action for Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States.

Objective

  • Integration of the social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainable development in policy-making at international, regional and national levels;
  • Wide-spread adoption of an integrated, cross-sectoral and broadly participatory approach to sustainable development;
  • Measurable progress in the implementation of the goals and targets of the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation.

CSD's role has been to ensure effective follow-up of UNCED; to monitor and report on implementation of the Earth Summit agreements at the local, national, regional and international levels. The CSD is a functional commission of the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), with 53 members. A five-year review of Earth Summit progress took place in 1997 by the United Nations General Assembly meeting in special session. In 2002, a ten-year review was held at the World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD) in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Promotion in the Water Sector

The Commission on Sustainable Development, at its twelfth session (2004) reviewed and assessed implementation of three thematic issues, including water and sanitation. Most recently, in 2005, at its thirteenth session, the Commission explored policy options for furthering implementation on the issues of water and sanitation as well as on human settlements as reflected in its decision.

 

 


United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs

http://www.un.org/esa/coordination/ngo

 

The Department of Economic and Social Affairs promotes and supports international cooperation to achieve development for all, and assists governments in agenda-setting and decision-making on development issues at the global level. DESA provides a broad range of analytical products and policy advice that serve as valuable sources of reference and decision-making tools for developed and developing countries, particularly in translating global commitments into national policies and action and in monitoring progress towards the internationally agreed development goals, including the Millennium Development Goals.

 

It implements strategies through normative, analytical, statistical and technical cooperation activities. These responsibilities include:

  • Contributing to and facilitation of the international dialogue and debate on development cooperation,
  • Supporting the coordination function of central intergovernmental bodies and assisting the Secretary-General in enhancing policy coherence and coordination, and
  • Supplement research and training to support the efforts of governments and local entities in formulating development strategies and building national capacities.

 

The DESA represents the interface between global policies and national action, and between research and operational activities, thereby facilitating the translation of international agreements to strategies at the country level, and channelling lessons learned and experiences gained from the country level into the international policy development process. In implementing the programme, the Department also aims at strengthening linkages between the UN and civil society and at developing innovative means of cooperation and modes of partnership in areas of common interest.

 

 

 

United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

 

http://www.undp.org

 

UNDP is the UN's global development network, an organization advocating for change and connecting countries to knowledge, experience and resources to help people build a better life. We are on the ground in 166 countries, working with them on their own solutions to global and national development challenges. As they develop local capacity, they draw on the people of UNDP and our wide range of partners.

As part of its mandate, UNDP has a key co-ordinating role in the United Nations Development Group (UNDG).

UNDP is helping to reinforce joint action on development in such forums as the Economic and Social Council and the General Assembly of the United Nations. Over the past years it has played an important role in fostering coordination in summits such as Financing for Development 2002 and the World Summit on Sustainable Development 2002.

UNDP has seven priority practice areas:

  • Democratic Governance
  • Poverty Reduction
  • Crisis Prevention and Recovery
  • Energy and Environment
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Women’s Empowerment
  • Capacity Development

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

Working towars the MDGs:

UNDP is working with a wide range of partners to help create coalitions for change to support the goals at global, regional and national levels, to benchmark progress towards them, and to help countries to build the institutional capacity, policies and programmes needed to achieve the MDGs.

Guided by the UN Core Strategy, UNDP's work on the MDGs focuses on coordinating global and local efforts that:

  • Campaign and mobilise for the MDGs through advocacy;
  • Share the best strategies for meeting the MDGs in terms of innovative practices, policy and institutional reforms, means of policy implementation, and evaluation of financing options;
  • Monitor and report progress towards the MDGs; and
  • Support governments in tailoring the MDGs to local circumstances and challenges.

 

 

 

United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP)

http://www.unep.org

 

UNEP, established in 1972, is the voice for the environment within the United Nations system. UNEP acts as a catalyst, advocate, educator and facilitator to promote the wise use and sustainable development of the global environment. To accomplish this, UNEP works with a wide range of partners, including United Nations entities, international organizations, national governments, non-governmental organizations, the private sector and civil society

 

Mission

 To provide leadership and encourage partnership in caring for the environment by inspiring, informing, and enabling nations and peoples to improve their quality of life without compromising that of future generations

UNEP work encompasses:

· Assessing global, regional and national environmental conditions and trends

· Developing international and national environmental instruments

· Strengthening institutions for the wise management of the environment

· Facilitating the transfer of knowledge and technology for sustainable development

· Encouraging new partnerships and mind-sets within civil society and the private sector

UNEP is primarily funded through the UN with some additional funding through its Environment Fund (voluntary), Trust Funds (extra-budgetary resources that are separate accounts for complementary or supplementary programmes) and Counter-part Contributions.

 

 

 

Water and Sanitation Programme (WSP)

 

http://www.wsp.org

 

Objective

The Water and Sanitation Program (WSP) is a multi-donor partnership administered by the World Bank to support poor people in obtaining affordable, safe and sustainable access to water and sanitation services. We work directly with client governments at the local and national level in 25 countries through regional offices in Africa, East and South Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, and in, Washington D.C.

WSP focuses on five topics that are represented in each of our regions.

Financing the Sector
Rural Water Supply and Sanitation
Strategic Communications
Sanitation and Hygiene
Urban Water Supply and Sanitation

 

Budget

WSP is an independent, donor-funded program administered within the Department of Energy, Water and Transport in the Sustainable Development Network Vice Presidency of The World Bank.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

WSP has led or supported many of the advances made within the water and sanitation sector over the last three decades.  We are able to share best practices across regions and place a strong focus on capacity-building by forming partnerships with academia, civil society organizations, donors, governments, media, private sector, and others.  Our work helps to effect the regulatory and structural changes needed for broad water and sanitation sector reform.

Our challenge is to replicate successful approaches, continue targeted learning efforts, and support reforms that ensure the adoption of sustainable investments in the sector that help people rise from poverty

 

 

 

Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC)

http://www.wsscc.org

 

The Collaborative Council exists under a mandate from the United Nations. It is governed by a multi-stakeholder steering committee elected by the Collaborative Council's members, combining the authority of the UN with the flexibility of an NGO and the legitimacy of a membership organisation.

WSSCC focuses exclusively on those people around the world who currently lack water and sanitation, with all its policies and work aimed only to serve those people. The Collaborative Council has a special interest in sanitation and hygiene and emphasises the need to view water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) as an inseparable trinity for development.

 

Objective

WSSCC's mission is to achieve sustainable water supply and sanitation for ALL people by following six core principles:

  • WSSCC only exists to serve poor people
  • The people themselves are at the centre of planning and action for achieving sustainable water and sanitation
  • WSSCC works by enhancing collaboration among sector agencies and professionals rather than implementing its own projects
  • Water and sanitation are essential for social and economic development
  • WSSCC aims to be at the forefront of global knowledge, debate and influence in its field
  • The number of people without sanitation is much greater than the number without water, while the agencies working in sanitation are fewer; therefore WSSCC dedicates most of its effort to sanitation and hygiene.

In 2000, the Collaborative Council presented "Vision 21", a process and a document that set out an ambitious plan to achieve global water supply and sanitation coverage by 2025. Vision 21 emphasizes the importance of people centred approaches to achieve sustainable water supply and adequate sanitation services.

Using the MDGs' targets as milestones, the Collaborative Council aims to improve access to water, sanitation and hygiene for all people. The Collaborative Council promotes achievement of the water supply and sanitation targets as an integral component of other MDGs - including the eradication of extreme poverty, the improvement of global health, and the attainment of gender equality and long-term social and economic development

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

The Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) has a track record of almost two decades in networking and advocacy, and a secure institutional host in WHO. It is firmly established as one of the major global organizations concerned with water and sanitation for poor communities.

 



International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN)

http://www.iucn.org

 

UCN, the International Union for Conservation of Nature, helps the world find pragmatic solutions to our most pressing environment and development challenges. It supports scientific research, manages field projects all over the world and brings governments, non-government organizations, United Nations agencies, companies and local communities together to develop and implement policy, laws and best practice.

 

IUCN is the world’s oldest and largest global environmental network - a democratic membership union with more than 1,000 government and NGO member organizations, and almost 11,000 volunteer scientists in more than 160 countries. It is funded by governments, bilateral and multilateral agencies, foundations, member organizations and corporations

 

Objective

Our mission is to influence, encourage and assist societies throughout the world to conserve the integrity and diversity of nature and to ensure that any use of natural resources is equitable and ecologically sustainable.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

All of IUCN’s work on biodiversity, climate change, energy, livelihoods and economics falls under a broad framework programme, discussed and approved by member organizations every four years at IUCN’s World Conservation Congress. The current programme runs from 2009-2012.

Within this broad programme, individual departments and initiatives in more than 60 offices, more than 1,000 member organizations, and more than 11,000 individual expert members, lead and manage the work in more than 160 countries around the world

People depend on natural resources for food, fuel and drinking water. The management, conservation, and restoration of ecosystems, known as ecosystem-based adaptation, can ensure that ecosystems continue to provide the services that enable people to adapt to climate change impacts.

 

 

 

World Health Organisation (WHO)

http://www.who.int/en

WHO is the directing and coordinating authority for health within the United Nations system. It is responsible for providing leadership on global health matters, shaping the health research agenda, setting norms and standards, articulating evidence-based policy options, providing technical support to countries and monitoring and assessing health trends.

Objective

Since its creation in 1948, the World Health Organisation has contributed to major accomplishments resulting in a healthier world. The objective of WHO is to let all peoples attain the highest possible level of health. Health, as defined in the WHO Constitution, is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.

Their six core principles are:

1.      Promoting development

2.      Fostering health security

3.      Strengthening health systems

4.      Harnessing research, information and evidence

5.      Enhancing partnerships

6.      Improving performance

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

It is reported that in each year, an estimated 3-5 billion episodes of diarrhoea result in an estimated 3 million deaths, mostly among children. Waterborne bacterial infections may account for as many as half of these episodes and deaths. Confronted with the challenge, WHO has addressed serious problems related to water, such as drinking water quality, arsenic in drinking water, environmental sanitation and hygiene promotion, heath in water resources development etc.

WHO recognises that most of water born diseases are prevalent in the poorest countries, which contribute to a vicious cycle of poverty-disease-poverty and the continued marginalisation of people living in disease-prone areas.

 

 

 

World Water Council (WWC)

http://www.worldwatercouncil.org

The World Water Council is an international multi-stakeholder platform. It was established in 1996 on the initiative of renowned water specialists and international organizations, in response to an increasing concern about world water issues from the global community.

Objective

To promote awareness, build political commitment and trigger action on critical water issues at all levels, including the highest decision-making level, to facilitate the efficient conservation, protection, development, planning, management and use of water in all its dimensions on an environmentally sustainable basis for the benefit of all life on earth.

 

Budget

The Council is financed primarily through membership fees and additional support is provided by the host City of Marseilles. Specific projects and programs are financed through donations and grants from governments, international organizations and NGO's.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

Among the wide range of activities carried out in order to achieve their objectives, the main Council event is the World Water Forum, which takes place once every three years. The Council also supports various dialogues, including cross-cutting ones, monitoring programs, workshops, publications, etc. All the Council's activities are conducted through committees, working groups and task forces, under the responsibility of the Board of Governors.

 

 

 

UNESCO – Natural Science 

http://www.unesco.org/water

 

The UNESCO Water Portal’s objective is to improve access to information on freshwater on the web.

The site serves as a thematic entry point to the current UNESCO and UNESCO-led programmes on freshwater. It also provides a platform for sharing and browsing websites of other water-related organizations, government bodies and NGOs through the water links and events databases.

Available in English, French and Spanish, the UNESCO Water Portal newsletter brings you the latest news, events, facts and figures, publications and links about a different water related theme every two weeks.

 

 

 

International Water and Sanitation Centre (IRC)

http://www.irc.nl/page/104

 

Since its foundation in 1968, the IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre (IRC) has facilitated the sharing, promotion and use of knowledge so that governments, professionals and organisations can better support poor men, women and children in developing countries to obtain water and sanitation services they will use and maintain

 

 

Care

http://www.care-international.org/   

 

CARE is a leading humanitarian organization fighting global poverty. Non-political and non-sectarian, we operate each year in more than 65 countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Middle East and Eastern Europe, reaching more than 50 million people in poor communities.

CARE helps tackle underlying causes of poverty so that people can become self-sufficient. CARE is often one of the first to deliver emergency aid to survivors of natural disasters and war and, once the immediate crisis is over, we help people rebuild their lives. While CARE is a large international organisation with more than 14,500 employees worldwide, we have a strong local presence: more than 90 % of our staff are nationals of the countries where our programmes are run.

 

Objectives

All of CARE International’s member organizations share a common vision to fight against worldwide poverty and to protect and enhance human dignity. n this context, emergency relief is an important part of CARE’s mandate since natural and manmade disasters can drive otherwise self-sustaining populations into poverty and can often eradicate years of development work. CARE pays particular attention to the marginalized members of society and those least able to defend themselves, especially women and children.

 

CARE’s mission is to serve individuals and families in the poorest communities in the world. Drawing strength from our global diversity, resources and experience, we promote innovative solutions and are advocates for global responsibility. We promote lasting change by:

  1. Strengthening capacity for self-help
  2. Providing economic opportunity
  3. Delivering relief in emergencies
  4. Influencing policy decisions at all levels
  5. Addressing discrimination in all its forms

 

Budget

CARE’s work is made possible with the support of our donors, which include United Nations agencies, the European Commission, as well as national governments.

CARE International Members are also supported through the generosity of many individuals, corporations, trusts, foundations and community groups. We believe that all of our donors are essential partners in a growing global movement dedicated to the end of poverty.

Multilateral partners

  • European Union (EU) through the European Commission Humanitarian Office (ECHO)
    and Directorates General for Development (DG DEV), External Affairs (DG Relex), and Enlargement.
  • Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)
  • International Labour Organisation (ILO)
  • International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD)
  • United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
  • United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM)
  • United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
  • United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA)
  • United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT)
  • United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
  • Steering Committee for Humanitarian Response (SCHR)
  • The World Bank (WB)
  • World Health Organization (WHO)
  • World Food Programme (WFP)

Bilateral partners

  • Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID)
  • Austrian Federal Chancellery
  • Austrian Federal Ministry of Foreign Affairs
  • UK Government's Department for International Development (DFID)
  • Caisse Française de Développement
  • Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA)
  • Danish Cooperation for Environment and Development (DANCED)
  • Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA)
  • Dutch Ministry of Development Cooperation
  • French Ministry of Cooperation
  • German Ministry of Economical Cooperation and Development
  • Japanese Government
  • Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (NORAD)
  • Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs
  • United States Agency for International Development (USAID)
  • United States Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA)

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

CARE helps communities to build and maintain clean water systems and latrines. Both directly and through local organizations, CARE provides training and subsidizes construction, but communities make significant contributions both in cash and labour, and pay the cost of operation and maintenance. The goal of these projects is to reduce the health risks of water-related diseases and to increase the earning potential of households by saving time otherwise spent fetching water. Projects also include educating people about good hygiene practice, which reduces the risk of illnesses.

 

 

 

Charity: Water

http://www.charitywater.org/

 

Charity: water is a non-profit organization bringing clean and safe drinking water to people in developing nations. 100% of public donations directly fund water projects.

 

Objectives

We’re not offering grand solutions and billion dollar schemes, but instead, simple things that work. Things like freshwater wells, rainwater catchments and sand filters. For about $20 a person, we know how to help millions.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

In four years, charity: water has raised more than $20 million and funded 2,906 water projects. View them here by country, local partner and project type:

http://www.charitywater.org/projects/ 

 

 


Asian Development Bank (ADB)

http://www.freshwateraction.net/web/w/www_59_en.aspx  http://www.adb.org/

 

ADB is a multilateral development finance institution dedicated to reducing poverty in Asia and the Pacific. Established in 1966, it is owned by 59 members, mostly from the region.

 

Objectives

It proposes Strategic Development Objectives by adopting Poverty Reduction, carrying out activities to promote economic growth, develop human resources, improve the status of women, and protect the environment. Its other key development objectives, such as law and policy reform, regional cooperation, private-sector development, and social development, also contribute significantly to this main goal.

Budget

Operations in ADB are financed by issuing bonds, recycling repayments and receiving contributions from member countries. The total assets of ADB in 2000 were around $43.8 billion.

Promotion in the Water Sector

ADB has been actively involved in the water sector and financed projects for irrigation, drainage, flood control, water supply and sanitation, hydropower, fisheries, forestry and watershed management, navigation, or multiple uses. Since its establishment in 1966, over $15 billion, or about 19 percent of its total lending, has been invested in water sector projects. Of this, hydropower ($2.8 billion), irrigation and drainage ($5 billion), water supply and sanitation ($4 billion), watershed management ($636 million), and flood control ($523 million) have been the principal areas of attention. Technical assistance worth $280 million has been provided to prepare projects, research sector issues, formulate sector solutions, and build institutional capacities. ADB's assistance has been provided mainly in the context of evolving country and sector strategies.

ADB attempts to move from an era of disaggregated water sector investments aimed primarily at creating assets to an era of holistic, integrated investments to promote efficient water use. The objectives of ADB are:

  • To support the development of an effective legislative framework and to provide a mechanism for dispute resolution.
  • To promote efficiencies in water use by supporting demand management, including water pricing.
  • To target the poor's equitable access to water, the empowerment of communities in the process of water management.

It attempts to include different stakeholders from different sectors, such as NGOs, representatives of user groups, the private sector, academia and government agencies in water management and development. The ADB seems to emphasise its role as financial supporter to facilitate multi-stake holder participation in water related development projects with the strategy of poverty reduction. However, the ADB's energetic drive towards multi stakeholder participation seems to be offset and in question by the fact that a large percentage of the poor people in Asia still face major difficulties in getting access to safe water.

 

More info on ways that civil organizations can work with ADB:   http://www.adb.org/NGOs/ngo-work.asp

 

 

 

Circle of Blue

http://www.siwi.org/partnerships

 

Circle of Blue is the international network of leading journalists, scientists and communications design experts that reports and presents the information necessary to respond to the global freshwater crisis. It is a nonprofit affiliate of the internationally recognized water, climate and policy think tank, the Pacific Institute.

Circle of Blue publishes WaterNews, the daily go-to source for global water news and data. It is also the co-founder of the global initiative, Designing Water’s Future, which emerged from a World Economic Forum session led by Circle of Blue and Collins: Transformative Design.

 

 Objectives

Circle of Blue makes the complexities of the global freshwater crisis relevant and personal. Circle of Blue reports and collects information and data, and presents it in coherent, accessible and connected forms. Circle of Blue provides a highly visible forum for response, and through communications design, extends awareness into action. In most cases, the solutions to solve the global freshwater crisis exist. What’s lacking is the awareness and will to respond.

Circle of Blue approaches the freshwater crisis with three coordinated, interrelated components: front-line journalism, existing and new science and data, and innovative communications design. Circle of Blue’s reporting captures the heart through exceptional fact-based storytelling, making water issues personal and relevant while providing a hub for data visualization, aggregation, and integration. Circle of Blue applies the best tools of the 21st century to help provide the knowledge that people need to make informed decisions.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

WaterNews is the daily extension of Circle of Blue’s long-form journalistic and scientific coverage of the global freshwater crisis. WaterNews encompasses a wide range of multimedia information — from the complex to the quirky — frontline reporting that’s engaging, valuable, timely and relevant. Circle of Blue strives to identify and describe the dimensions of the global freshwater crisis in ways not imagined only a few years ago.

 

 

 

Clearwater Initiative

http://www.clearwaterinitiative.org/

 

ClearWater Initiative is a non-governmental charitable organization that strives to provide clean, potable water solutions to populations in need.

 

Objectives

It is our mission to provide clean water to populations affected by natural or man-made humanitarian emergencies. We respond by promoting and funding both established and innovative clean water solutions. Our projects are implemented in partnerships with local Ugandan engineers. Projects are audited to ensure accountability.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

Thanks to your generous support, ClearWater has provided clean, sustainable drinking water to more than 6,500 people since 2007! Examples of projects include:

 

 

 

European Water Partnership

http://www.ewp.eu/

 

The European Water Partnership (EWP) is an independent value based non-profit organization structured as an open and inclusive member association.

The EWP harnesses European capacity, helps to coordinate initiatives and activities in international water issues and undertakes worldwide promotion of European expertise related to water.

The ultimate goal of the EWP is to elaborate strategies and implement concrete actions to achieve the objectives of the Water Vision for Europe.

 

Objectives

  • Provide an open and independent forum to discuss innovative management, technological and financial solutions,
  • Mobilise funding methods for water and develop new procurement approaches,
  • Stimulate and support cooperation between members,
  • Put water on the mainstream political and media agenda, improving awareness of the urgency of water challenges among policy makers and business,
  • Promote the achievement of the Millenium Development Goals in the wider Europe and through an EU neighbourhood policy for water and the Horizon 2020 programme for the Mediterranean,
  • Contribute Independently to the EU water-related initiatives,
  • Promote technological and managerial innovation, developing projects to demonstrate innovative techologies and solutions, enabling these technologies to reach the market.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

The activities of the European Water Partnership focus on initiating, supporting and enhancing initiatives and projects, contributing to reaching the Water Vision for Europe.

For 2009, the EWP’s activities are grouped in five main projects:

Aquawareness

“Changing behaviour, habits and practices towards sustainable water management in Europe”

Climate Change Adaptation and Water

“Sets up a stronger coordination and cooperation on Climate Change Adaptation and Water”

European Water House

“The place that will give your Water Vision the chance to be a reality!”

European Regional Process and follow up

“Prepared the European contribution to the fifth World Water Forum, Istanbul 2009″

INNOWATER

 “Facilitates the market uptake of new technologies addressing water challenges”

 

 


Food and Water Watch

http://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/water/

 

Food & Water Watch is a non-profit organization that advocates for common sense policies that will result in healthy, safe food and access to safe and affordable drinking water. Everyone is dependent on shared resources like clean water, safe food and healthy oceans. It’s essential that these shared resources be regulated in the public interest rather than for private gain.

 

Objectives

Food & Water Watch works to ensure the food, water and fish we consume is safe, accessible and sustainably produced. So we can all enjoy and trust in what we eat and drink, we help people take charge of where their food comes from, keep clean, affordable, public tap water flowing freely to our homes, protect the environmental quality of oceans, force government to do its job protecting citizens, and educate about the importance of keeping shared resources under public control.

Promotion in the Water Sector

  • Renew America’s Water
  • Private Vs. Public
  • Bottled Water
  • Water Conservation
  • Desalination
  • Chemical contaminants
  • Groundwater
  • California
  • World Water

 

 

 

 Friends of the Earth-Middle East

http://www.foeme.org/  

 

Friends of the Earth Middle East (FoEME) is a unique organization that brings together Jordanian, Palestinian, and Israeli environmentalists.

 

Objectives

Our primary objective is the promotion of cooperative efforts to protect our shared environmental heritage. In so doing, we seek to advance both sustainable regional development and the creation of necessary conditions for lasting peace in our region. FoEME has offices in Amman, Bethlehem, and Tel-Aviv. FoEME is a member of Friends of the Earth International, the largest grassroots environmental organization in the world. 

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

 

 

 

 

Gender and Water Alliance

http://www.genderandwater.org/ 

 

GWA is a global network dedicated to mainstream gender in water resoures management. It is registered as an Association under Dutch law and has more than 1800 members in 120 countries worldwide. Its membership is diverse and represents a wide range of capacities and expertise across all water sectors as well as from different stakeholder groups including government, grassroots organisations, NGOs, universities and research institutes, international agencies and individual consultants. More than eighty percent of the membership comes from a diversity of countries in Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East.

 

Objectives

The mission of GWA is to promote women’s and men’s equitable access to and management of safe and adequate water, for domestic supply, sanitation, food security and environmental sustainability. GWA believes that equitable access to and control over water is a basic right for all, as well as a critical factor in promoting poverty eradication and sustainability.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector  

 

 

Global Water

http://www.globalwater.org/ 

 

Global Water is an international, non-profit, humanitarian organization founded in 1982. We’re focused on creating safe water supplies, sanitation facilities and hygiene-related facilities for rural villagers in developing countries. We believe the lack of safe drinking water and sanitation facilities are the root causes of hunger, disease and poverty throughout the developing world. Our water projects have an immediate life-changing impact, particularly for women and children, who have the responsibility to gather water for their families every day of their lives in the developing world. Successful Global Water projects utilize water and sanitation as a tool to create sustainable socioeconomic development in these poor rural communities.

 

Objectives

1.) Global Water investigates and identifies local, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in a developing country that are currently working with rural water supply projects.

Often there are local organizations in developing countries that have water infrastructure expertise and are already working with rural villages in need of a safe water supply. We call these organizations “water-advocacy” NGOs. A suitable water-advocacy NGO will have the following characteristics:

• provide leadership necessary to liaison (and create a relationship with) water project recipients;
• provide organizational expertise to plan a project with Global Water’s help;
• provide on-site skilled supervision throughout the project;
• provide after-project continuity to monitor equipment installed during project construction and provide   maintenance, as needed;

2.) Global Water works closely with local water-advocacy NGOs in a developing country to identify suitable water projects in rural villages of their country.

Global Water travels to developing countries we are working in to inspect potential project sites and to conduct water quality sampling, as required.

3.) Global Water helps local water-advocacy NGOs determine what equipment is essential to satisfy the requirements of a particular project.

In particular, Global Water’s Program Manager and technical advisors will help determine if disinfection or other water treatment technologies are necessary to satisfy the requirements of a particular water project. Relatively simple technologies (such as spring catchment and rain catchment water supply systems, slow-sand filtration treatment equipment and ferro-cement storage tanks) will be the first technologies to be considered; however, if conditions allow, state-of-the-art technologies will also be considered when more sophisticated water treatment is warranted.

4.) Global Water provides partial to full funding for the project.

Besides the funding provided by Global Water, a small % of the funding (approximately 10%) necessary for a completed water project must come from the recipients of the water project either up-front or in the form of a stipend paid as the water supply system is used; this funding can also be paid in terms of materials, such as gravel, sand and cement, as needed. In addition, all unskilled labor must be provided by the recipients of the water project for the entire duration of the project construction period.

5.) Provide specialty water-related equipment to local water-advocacy NGOs.

Global Water purchases water treatment equipment not available in a particular developing country and ships it to the local NGOs for installation and use.

6.) Provide technical expertise to local water-advocacy NGOs during a project to help with project management, equipment installation and training.

Global Water communicates with local NGOs to insure problems that arise are corrected quickly and money is managed efficiently. Global Water helps with calculations necessary to size equipment and distribution pipelines and furnishes equipment training materials, such as installation and operation manuals, as required.

7.) Inspect completed projects and maintain continuity with a project site through the local water-advocacy NGO.

Global Water travels to developing countries we are working in to inspect completed project sites and to conduct water quality sampling, as required. We maintain a relationship with a project site by supporting the water project recipients with consulting, training and repair parts that will be installed with the help of the local water-advocacy NGO that installed the equipment.

8.) Global Water may assemble Water and Technical Emergency Response (W.A.T.E.R.) Teams to perform project work in developing countries.

Depending upon a particular project requirement, Global Water may assemble W.A.T.E.R. Teams to help local non-profit organizations with specific project work in a developing country. These teams are especially helpful during emergency crises events, such as natural disasters. These team members are typically trained volunteers that donate their time to perform technical, equipment-oriented humanitarian projects. They come from varied backgrounds, but most have a previous connection to the water supply and water equipment industries. Many are technically-oriented and retired or semi-retired who love to work on humanitarian projects to bring safe, clean water to people in need. They want to make a difference in the world -- and they do!

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

 http://globalwater.org/completed.htm

 

 

 

Global Water Challenge

 

http://www.globalwaterchallenge.org/home/

 

Global Water Challenge (GWC) is a coalition of leading organizations in the water and sanitation sector. Drawing upon the experience, expertise and assets of its 24 members, GWC is able to create partnerships that achieve far greater results than any one organization could achieve by itself.

 

Objectives

CONNECTING.

GWC is a platform for collaboration that unites corporations, implementing nonprofits, research institutes, and governmental agencies in partnerships that leverage their unique resources and expertise. In addition, GWC connects citizens with policymakers to increase the priority placed on water and sanitation globally.

INVESTING.

GWC has invested in and collaborated with members on more than a dozen innovative programs in countries around the world. Some examples include:

Schools Programs: GWC's investment in schools programs has benefited nearly 500,000 students in Kenya, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Tanzania, and Mexico. These programs have enhanced children's health and education, paving the way for more opportunities for the students, their families and their countries.

Ashoka Changemakers: In 2008, GWC and Ashoka Changemakers partnered to find and support social entrepreneurs with groundbreaking approaches to water and sanitation delivery.

LEARNING.

GWC is committed to improving the long-term impact of investments in the sector. Working with its members and other partners, GWC identifies and shares important lessons learned and best practices to improve future outcomes.

Building off the successes of its first three years, GWC formed a strategic alliance with the Global Environment & Technology Foundation (GETF) in April 2010. GETF's experience in creating public-private partnerships will help GWC achieve its mission of accelerating the flow of clean water and sanitation to those most in need.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Education in Schools and Communities

 

Found http://www.globalwaterchallenge.org/programs/projects.php

 

 

 

Global Green USA

http://www.globalgreen.org/ 

 

Founded in 1994 by activist and philanthropist Diane Meyer Simon, Global Green is the American Arm of Green Cross International (GCI), which was created by President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to foster a global value shift toward a sustainable and secure future by reconnecting humanity with the environment.

Global Green USA is the only national environmental non-profit headquartered in Southern California with offices in New Orleans, Washington DC, and New York, and is one of over 31 national GCI affiliates throughout the world.

 

Objectives

Global Green is working to address some of the greatest challenges facing humanity. In the United States our work is primarily focused on fighting global climate change by creating green buildings and cities.

Internationally, Global Green and its affiliates are working toward:

  • Eliminating weapons of mass destruction that threaten lives and the environment
  • Providing clean, safe drinking water for the 2.4 billion people who lack access to clean water

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

http://www.globalgreen.org/water/

 

 

 

H2O for Life

http://www.h2oforlifeschools.org/ 

 

A nonprofit, all-volunteer organization run by teachers, parents, and students.

 

Objectives

H20 for Life aims to help students build an allegiance to and an understanding of their partner school through curriculum and experiential learning while raising funds for WASH in Schools projects.

 

Budget

100 percent of contributions raised by schools goes directly to partner school projects. All overhead expenses are funded through in-kind donations and grants.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

H20 for Life connects schools in the United States with schools in developing countries to complete WASH (WAter, Sanitation, and Hygiene) in Schools projects.

 

 

 

International Association of Hydro-Geologists (IAH)

http://www.iah.org/

 

Since 1956 an international forum on the management of groundwater for the benefit of mankind and the environment

IAH is a scientific and educational organisation whose aims are to promote research into and understanding of the proper management and protection of groundwater for the common good throughout the world.

IAH has over 3800 members in 135 countries and welcomes all who support our objectives to join our Association. You can follow the links below to find out more about groundwater and groundwater events, about the benefits of membership of IAH , how the Association is run and about our activities.

 

Objectives

IAH works to promote awareness of groundwater with these organizations:

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

IAH encourages education and technology transfer worldwide, and welcomes suggestions from its members and working partners to enable this to happen.

IAH Burdon Groundwater Network
The IAH Burdon Network is a catalyst for improving support to and resources for groundwater professionals in developing countries. Rural water supply in Sub-Saharan Africa has been the area of initial focus, because of the internationally recognised need. In recent years the Network has contributed to a Kampala climate change conference, published a series of papers on groundwater in Africa and organised a book distribution scheme, and continues to help foster communication between members in developing countries and encourage the formation of new national chapters.

Go to: http://www.iah.org/burdon/default.htm 

 

 

 

International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) 

http://iahs.info/ 

Hydrological sciences e-journals and publications

 


International Association for Water Law (IAWL)

http://www.aida-waterlaw.org/ 

 

The International Association for Water Law,
usually referred to as AIDA from its Spanish acronym,
was created in Washington, D.C., the USA, on 30 May 1967
during the Water for Peace Conference when the need
for an NGO to provide a forum for questions concerning
water law became evident.

The Association is a private, non-profit, international organization comprised of lawyers specialized in water law and of non-lawyers directly involved in the management of water resources. The Headquarters of the Secretariat are currently located in the offices of the Chairman of the Executive Council in Switzerland.

 

Objectives

The purpose of the Association is to foster the
evolution, study, understanding and application
of water law, national and international, with a view to
raising awareness, and the knowledge and practice,
of this field of the law of natural resources.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector 

The Association has consultative status with the ECOSOC of the United Nations and with a number of its specialized agencies, as well as with the World Bank.

 

 

 

 

International Commission on Large Dams (ICOLD)

http://www.icold-cigb.net/ 

 

The International Commission on Large Dams (ICOLD) is a non-governmental International Organization which provides a forum for the exchange of knowledge and experience in dam engineering.

Objectives

The Organization leads the profession in ensuring that dams are built safely, efficiently, economically, and without detrimental effects on the environment. Its original aim was to encourage advances in the planning, design, construction, operation, and maintenance of large dams and their associated civil works, by collecting and disseminating relevant information and by studying related technical questions.

Promotion in the Water Sector

Since the late sixties, focus was put on subjects of current concern such as dam safety, monitoring of performance, reanalysis of older dams and spillways, effects of ageing and environmental impact. More recently, new subjects include cost studies at the planning and construction stages, harnessing international rivers, information for the public at large, and financing.

 

 

 

International Medical Corps

http://www.internationalmedicalcorps.org/

 

International Medical Corps is a global, humanitarian, nonprofit organization dedicated to saving lives and relieving suffering through health care training and relief and development programs. Established in 1984 by volunteer doctors and nurses, International Medical Corps is a private, voluntary, nonpolitical, nonsectarian organization.

 

Objectives

Its mission is to improve the quality of life through health interventions and related activities that build local capacity in underserved communities worldwide. By offering training and health care to local populations and medical assistance to people at highest risk, and with the flexibility to respond rapidly to emergency situations, International Medical Corps rehabilitates devastated health care systems and helps bring them back to self-reliance.

 

International Medical Corps Worldwide is a global humanitarian alliance that comprises the resources and capabilities of two independent affiliate organizations, International Medical Corps and International Medical Corps UK. Together, our mission is to save lives and relieve suffering through the provision of health care and training. With headquarters in the United States and the United Kingdom respectively, we collaborate to maximize resources for the delivery of appropriate relief and development activities

International Medical Corps focuses on the delivery of community-based primary health care.  We emphasize training and education, and prioritize hiring local staff – in fact, 96% of our field-based staff and health professionals are recruited from the local community. This helps to ensure that skills and knowledge are passed on and remain long after our programs have ended. Through the integration of specialties like emergency medicine, women’s health, nutrition services, water and sanitation, and mental health into the primary health care setting, we ensure that those we serve receive holistic, comprehensive care.

Within the foundation of primary health care delivery, we have developed the following program priorities:

 

Budget

International Medical Corps is one of the most efficient and effective international relief and development charities operating today. We spend 93 percent of our operating budget on programs, ensuring that your donations have maximum impact on the victims of war, disease, and disaster in more than 25 countries and regions around the world in which we work. In short, International Medical Corps makes your money count.

 

Promotion in the water sector

We incorporate water and sanitation into our community-based programs so that public health is not only possible, but sustainable.  We build wells, latrines, and large-scale water treatment and waste management systems so that communities, even in the world’s most water-stressed areas, are no longer threatened by waterborne illness.

 

 

 

 

 

International Office for Water

http://www.oieau.fr/spip.php?sommaire&lang=en

 

The INTERNATIONAL OFFICE FOR WATER (IOW) is a non-profit-making Association

 

Objectives

The objective of International Office for Water is to gather public and private partners involved in water resources management and protection in France, Europe and in the world 

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

▸ International cooperation

IOWater’s Department of International Cooperation, located at Sophia Antipolis, provides institutional and technical assistance within bilateral or multilateral projects for institutional support to governments, municipalities, agencies and public companies for accompanying administrative reforms in the field of water.

▸ Integrated Water Ressource Management (IWRM)

The International Office for Water has great and internationally-recognized experience in the field of transboundary IWRM and also knows very well the West African context

▸ Governance of public drinking water supply and sanitation utilities

▸ Training the Water professionals

Ensuring the availability of the water resource, preventing floods, preserving aquatic environments, making drinking water and sanitation accessible for everyone are major stakes for our societies. For such a purpose, it is necessary to create organizations, to build infrastructures, to build and operate plants. But, first of all, it is necessary that the men and women, who have to make decisions, to design, exploit, manage, have the necessary abilities. Capacity building has always been at the core of IOWater activities.

▸ Water Information Systems: organization, design and operation

Access to the information on the status and evolution of the resource and uses is a major stake for water policy: should it be regulatory actions, planning, risk management or public information, the managers of water resources, communities and operators, … regularly need to have reliable, up-dated and relevant information.

▸ Expert reports, studies and strategic assistance

IOWater has many references in Facilitating good governance of water policies, Combining technical and scientific, legal and financial but also prospective skills, and Supporting local policies

▸ Promotion of exchanges between water stakeholders

IOWater is managing and participating in several networks in France, Europe and in the world.

▸ Water management for agriculture

The significance of water for agriculture and thus for feeding the populations has not to be proven anymore, but further still, agricultural water seems one of the major factors for the development of developing economies. Relying on the French experience, IOWater is thus involved in this area of water resources management.

 

 

 

International Rivers

http://www.internationalrivers.org/ 

 

International Rivers (formerly known as International Rivers Network or IRN), was founded in 1985 and the focus of our work is in Latin America, Asia and Africa.

We seek a world in which rivers and the life they support are valued, and where all people have a voice in decisions affecting their lives and livelihoods. We work toward a world where everyone has access to clean water and energy, and where development projects neither degrade nature nor destroy communities.

 

Objectives

International Rivers' mission is to protect rivers and defend the rights of communities that depend on them. We oppose destructive dams and the development model they advance, and encourage better ways of meeting people’s needs for water, energy and protection from damaging floods. To achieve this mission, we collaborate with a global network of local communities, social movements, non-governmental organizations and other partners. Through research, education and advocacy, International Rivers works to halt destructive river infrastructure projects, address the legacies of existing projects, improve development policies and practices, and promote water and energy solutions for a just and sustainable world. The primary focus of our work is in the global South.

International Rivers seeks a world in which rivers and the ecosystems they support are valued, and the importance of the links between healthy environments and healthy societies are understood. We envision a world where development projects neither degrade nature nor impoverish people, and where all people have a voice in decisions affecting their lives and livelihoods.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

International Rivers works to protect rivers and rights, and promote real solutions for meeting water, energy and flood management needs around the globe. Our main campaign regions and topics are listed below. More info found on projects here http://www.internationalrivers.org/en/our-work

 

 

 

International Water and Sanitation Centre (IRC)

http://www.irc.nl/  http://www.irc.nl/page/104

 

 

Bridging the knowledge gap and joint learning with partners for improved, low-cost water supply, sanitation and hygiene in developing countries.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

 

Projects  http://www.irc.nl/page/101  

 

 


International Water Association (IWA) 

http://www.iwahq.org/Home/

 

The International Water Association is a global reference point for water professionals, spanning the continuum between research and practice and covering all facets of the water cycle. Through its network of members and experts in research, practice, regulation, industry, consulting and manufacturing, IWA is in a better position than any other organization to help water professionals create innovative, pragmatic and sustainable solutions to challenging global needs.

IWA themes

The work and activities of our members, wheter thorugh established mechanisms like specialist groups, task groups, at confrences or in print, is complemeted by a range of activities divided into strategic themes and programmes. They are designed to facilitate members' engagement on issues which are considered critical to the water sector's wider development.

Cities of the Future

Developing new paradigms for highly efficient urban water services in new and existing cities throughout the world.

Read more

Managing utilities and their assets

Enabling utilities to meet the evolving service challenges and tripple bottom line objectives in developing and developed countries, this programme covers everything between strategic asset management to operation and maintenance.

Read more

Science and application of water management

Exploring advances in fundamental water science, research and technology development related to urban drainage and the treatment of water, wastewater and stormwater.

Read more

Water and health

Enabling utilities to meet the evolving service challenges and tripple bottom line objectives in developing and developed countries this programme covers everything between strategic management to operation and maintenance.

Read more

Water, climate and energy

Developing strategies for adapting and optimising water services in the context of population growth, climate change and related energy impacts.

Read more

 

 

 

International Water Resources Association (IWRA)

http://196.36.166.88/iwra/ 

 

IWRA has strived to improve water management worldwide through dialogue, education, and research for over 35 years. Since its official formation in 1972, the organization has actively promoted the sustainable management of water resources around the globe. The world is a much smaller place today than when IWRA began its work due to advancing technologies and global social changes. The belief that sustainability requires interdisciplinary action and international cooperation is a driving force behind the association. IWRA seeks to improve water resource outcomes by improving our collective understanding of the physical, biological, chemical, institutional, and socioeconomic aspects of water.

IWRA is committed to the sound management of water resources through:

  • advancing water resources and related environmental research promoting water resources
  • education improving exchanges of information and expertise networking with other
  • organizations who share common interests and goals providing an international forum
  • on water resource issues

IWRA is about networking. Networking the people, information, and organizations that are vitally concerned with the global sustainability of water resources. IWRA is one of the founding members of the World Water Council and played a key role in its formation as an organization committed to global water policy. IWRA is committed to its members and their professional development and advancement.

IWRA provides its members with access to the latest in information, programs, and international experts. The present leadership of IWRA is strongly committed to the goals of the organization and to providing the membership with a quality organization.

 

 

Life Water

http://www.lifewater.org/ 

 

Lifewater International is a Christian not-for-profit development organization that believes all people should have safe water for life. With a focus on sustainability, Lifewater helps communities gain safe water, adequate sanitation, effective hygiene, and the skills they need to pass on these resources to future generations.

 

Objectives

Compelled by God’s call and the global water and sanitation crisis,
Lifewater International equips partner organizations and works with
them to empower communities in developing countries to gain safe water,
adequate sanitation, effective hygiene, and the knowledge of Jesus’ love.

Our vision is a world where every person has access to safe water, improved health,
and the knowledge of Jesus’ love.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

To carry out our mission, Lifewater has developed three program areas - Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH*) - to help our in-country partners be more effective in the communities in which they work. Generally speaking, a Lifewater “project” consists of the implementation of one or more WASH program area with a national partner. See our strategy section for more information on how Lifewater works with in-country partners.

Lifewater's WASH program areas involve the application of technology, but technology by itself will not bring about positive change in a community. Before any improvement in technology can be effective, communities must understand, embrace, and take ownership of the changes. Without this level of community involvement, which generally takes considerable time to develop, a new technology is not likely to be sustainable.

Lifewater’s programs emphasize full participation of the community, with the goal of community ownership of any new technology. The courses in Effective Community Development introduce principles and practices that foster community participation. Furthermore, we try to ensure that we are using appropriate technologies so that the community can maintain them.

  • Well drilling
  • Sanitation: Latrines
  • WASH Promotion
  • Hand Pump Repair
  • Community Health through Hygiene
  • Effective Community Development
  • Water Treatment
  • WASH in schools

 

 

Mercy Corps

http://www.mercycorps.org/ 

Mercy Corps helps people in the world’s toughest places turn the crises of natural disaster, poverty and conflict into opportunities for progress. Driven by local needs and market conditions, our programs provide communities with the tools and support they need to transform their own lives. Our worldwide team of 3,700 professionals is improving the lives of 16.7 million people in more than 40 countries.

For information regarding Budget  link to : http://www.mercycorps.org/financials

Promotion in the Water Sector 

Water/Sanitation

Water is essential for life, good health and economic development — yet more than one billion people lack access to clean water. Mercy Corps' work fulfills the water needs of vulnerable populations: We pipe clean drinking water to rural communities, help solve resource-based conflicts and deliver water to families during emergencies.

 

 

 

The Millennium Water Alliance

http://www.mwawater.org/ 

 

At the 2002 World Summit for Sustainable Development, then Secretary of State Colin Powell announced the U.S. commitment to the Goals for Sustainable Development. One goal is to “reduce by half, the proportion of people without access to safe and affordable drinking water and sanitation” by the year 2015.

To help reach these critical goals, leading U.S. based, non-governmental organizations formed the Millennium Water Alliance (MWA). The MWA is a cooperating group of U.S. humanitarian and faith-based NGOs working to assist poor communities in the developing world gain access to safe water and sanitation.

The Millennium Water Alliance (MWA) was created to help 500 million people obtain water and basic sanitation by 2015, also known as the Millennium Development Goal. Our vision mirrors our belief that no one should die or suffer chronic illness as the result of a water-related disease.

Objectives

Our mission is to assist people in developing countries with access to safe water, sanitation and hygiene education by offering sustainable solutions through advocacy, learning and collaborative programming. The Millennium Water Alliance seeks a world where everybody is able to use safe water, has access to basic sanitation and practices good hygiene.


Promotion in the Water Sector

 

The Millennium Water Alliance is the only organization in the world dedicated solely to meeting the Millennium Development Goal related to water set by world leaders in 2000 – and we’re the only organization that has the potential to actually achieve those goals.  The objective is clear, and we are uniquely positioned to reach it because of our:

  • Permanent Alliance of 13 water-focused NGOs
  • Global Reach
  • Focus on sharing the best techniques and strategies across all partners
  • Ability to make the case for very large donations to the water sector

 

 

The MWA is a unique permanent alliance of international NGOs with experience in water supply, hygiene education and promotion of sanitation. We facilitate cooperation with international and local NGOs and other stakeholders in the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) sector to build consensus on appropriate WASH policies and effective solutions.

 


 

Pacific Institute

http://www.pacinst.org/topics/water_and_sustainability/ 

 

The Pacific Institute is a nonpartisan research institute that works to advance environmental protection, economic development, and social equity.

 

Objectives

We envision a world where the basic needs of all people are met, where resources are managed sustainably and the natural world protected, and where conflicts over resources are resolved in a peaceful and democratic fashion.

 

The Pacific Institute works to create a healthier planet and sustainable communities. We conduct interdisciplinary research and partner with stakeholders to produce solutions that advance environmental protection, economic development, and social equity—in California, nationally, and internationally.

 

Budget

The Pacific Institute is a tax-exempt 501(c)(3) organization established in 1987, dedicated to protecting our natural world, encouraging sustainable development, and improving global security.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

The Pacific Institute currently has three main programs of research: Water, Community Strategies for Sustainability and Justice, and Globalization. In addition, the Institute focuses on four initiatives: International Water and Communities, Water Use in Business, Climate Impacts and Adaptation, and Integrity of Science.

 

 


Stockholm International Water Institute

http://www.siwi.org/about

 

The Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) is a policy institute whose diverse Stockholm-based, internationally-oriented programmes and activities contribute to finding sustainable solutions to the world’s escalating water crisis. SIWI manages projects, synthesises research and publishes findings and recommendations on current and future water, environment, governance and human development issues. SIWI serves as a platform for knowledge sharing and networking between the scientific, business, policy and civil society communities. SIWI builds professional capacity and understanding of the links between water-society-environment-economy. 

In all of its work, SIWI advocates future-oriented, knowledge-integrated water views in decision making, nationally and internationally, that lead to sustainable use of the world’s water resources, sustainable development of societies and reduced poverty. SIWI stresses that water is a key to socio-economic development and quality of life, and that through Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM), barriers which hinder increased food production, drinking water availability, sanitation coverage, health advances, pollution prevention and poverty reduction can be overcome.

 

Objectives

By creating opportunities for dialogue and collaboration between water experts and decision makers, SIWI stimulates the development of innovative policies and scientifically based solutions to water-related problems. This is necessary in order to achieve the UN Millennium Development Goals and the water-related targets which were agreed upon at the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg.

Internationally active, politically neutral, and intellectually objective, SIWI welcomes opportunities for collaboration with partners across the world.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

 

Swedish Water House

The Swedish Water House, administered by SIWI, is a government-funded initiative that promotes network building among Sweden-based, internationally oriented academic institutions, consultants, government agencies, NGOs, research institutes and other stakeholders interested in sharing water knowledge and expertise amongst themselves and with the global community. Through the work of its cluster groups and network partners, the Swedish Water House is involved in a wide-array of activities to strengthen the links between research, policy, and practice and mobilise Swedish competencies for an increased involvement in international water issues.

Water Governance Facility

The UNDP Water Governance Facility at SIWI works to improve water governance reform and implementation. The programme, developed by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) and funded by UNDP and Sida, provides policy support and advice to government agencies, civil society organisations and other stakeholders in developing countries to improve water governance and advance socially equitable, environmentally sustainable and economically efficient management of water resources. The facility operates in multiple thematic areas, including: integrated water resources management, transboundary water, water supply and sanitation, climate variability, gender, and capacity building.

 

UNPD is the host and organizer of World Water Week. For more info go to: http://www.siwi.org/worldwaterweek   

 

Parnerships http://www.siwi.org/partnerships

 

 


UN Water

http://www.unwater.org/flashindex.html  http://www.unwater.org/downloads/UNW_brochure_EN_webversion.pdf

 

UN-Water strengthens coordination and coherence among UN entities dealing with issues related to all aspects of freshwater and sanitation. This includes surface and groundwater resources, the interface between freshwater and seawater and water-related disasters.

 

UN-Water, an inter-agency mechanism formally established in 2003 by the United Nations High Level Committee on Programmes, has evolved out of a history of close collaboration among UN agencies. It was created to add value to UN initiatives by fostering greater co-operation and information-sharing among existing UN agencies and outside partners. UN-Water focuses on:

 

Providing information, policy briefs and other communication materials for policymakers and managers who work directly with water issues, other decision-makers

that have an influence on how water is used, as well as the general public.

 

Building the knowledge base on water issues through efficient monitoring and

reporting systems and facilitating easy access to this knowledge through regular

reports and the Internet.

 

Providing a platform for system-wide discussions to identify challenges in global

water management, analyse options for meeting these challenges and ensuring that

reliable information and sound analysis informs the global policy debate on water.

 

 

Objectives

The scope of UN-Water’s work encompasses all aspects of freshwater and

sanitation, including surface and groundwater resources and the interface

between freshwater and seawater and water-related disasters.

 

UN-Water was established to promote coherence and coordination in UN

System initiatives that are related to UN-Water’s scope of work and contribute

to the implementation of the agenda defined by the 2000 Millennium

Declaration and the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

Focus areas

  • Integrated water resources management
  • Drinking-water, sanitation and health
  • Water scarcity
  • Pollution
  • Transboundary waters
  • Climate change and disaster risk management
  • Gender and water
  • Financing and valuation
  • Capacity building
  • Africa: a region for priority action
  • Flagship Reports
  • World Water Development Report
  • WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme Reports
  • Global Annual Assessment on Sanitation and Drinking Water

 

Programmes

 

  • World Water Assessment Programme (WWAP)
  • The WHO / UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme on Water Supply and Sanitation (JMP)
  • UN-Water Decade Programme on Capacity Development (UNW-DPC)
  • The UN-Water Decade Programme on Advocacy and Communication (UNW-DPAC)

 

 


Unesco-IHE Institute for Water Education

 

http://www.unesco-ihe.org/ 

 

The UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education is an international institute for water education that was established in 2003. UNESCO-IHE continues the work that was started in 1957 when IHE first offered a postgraduate diploma course in hydraulic engineering to practicing professionals from developing countries.

 

UNESCO-IHE is instrumental in strengthening the efforts of other universities and research centres to increase the knowledge and skills of professionals working in the water sector.

 

The member states of UNESCO have access to the knowledge and services of UNESCO-IHE in human and institutional capacity building, which is vital in their efforts to achieve the Millennium Development Goals, the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation (Agenda 21) and other global water objectives.

 

Objectives

UNESCO-IHE envisages a world in which people manage their water and environmental resources in a sustainable manner, and in which all sectors of society, particularly the poor, can enjoy the benefits of basic services.

The mandate given by UNESCO to IHE is to:

  • strengthen and mobilise the global educational and knowledge base for integrated water resources management; and
  • contribute to meeting the water-related capacity building needs of developing countries and countries in transition.

Within this mandate, the mission of the Institute is to:

  • contribute to the education and training of professionals and to build the capacity of sector organisations, knowledge centres and other institutions active in the fields of water, the environment and infrastructure in developing countries and countries in transition.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

  • Serving as an international standard-setting body for postgraduate water education programmes and continuing professional training;
  • Building human and institutional capacities through education, training and research;
  • Setting up and managing networks of educational and water sector institutions and organisations worldwide;
  • Functioning as a ‘policy forum’ for UNESCO member states and other stakeholders; and
  • Providing advice on water education to partner organisations and other members of the UN water family.

UNESCO-IHE provides a wide range of services to a variety of target groups in developing countries and countries in transition:

  • Education, training and research – for water sector professionals, engineers, scientists, consultants and decision-makers working in the water, environment and infrastructure sectors.
  • Water sector capacity building – for water sector ministries and departments, municipalities, water boards and water utilities, universities, training and research institutes, industries, non-governmental and private sector organisations.
  • Partnership building and networking – among knowledge centres, public and private sector organisations.
  • Standard setting for education and training – for water-related institutions, universities and other education and training agencies in the water sector.
  • Policy forum on water – for UNESCO member states and other stakeholders.


http://www.unesco-ihe.org/About/UNESCO-Water  :

 

UNESCO is committed to implementing the international water agenda, consisting primarily of promoting integrated water resources management, and achieving the Millennium Development Goals and the targets laid out in the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation (Agenda 21).

UNESCO also serves as lead agency for the UN Decade on Education for Sustainable Development (2005–2014).

UNESCO’s work in the water sector is built on the following pillars:

At its heart is the long-standing International Hydrological Programme (IHP) , now carried out in collaboration with academic and professional institutions, the IHP National Committees, and the governments of UNESCO’s member states.

UNESCO Water-related Chairs are joint undertakings between UNESCO and interested parties. They can be established as teaching or research facilities at a university or other higher education or research institute.

The UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education , as well as some 10 associated regional and international centres around the world .

The World Water Assessment Programme (WWAP) , a joint initiative of 24 bodies of the United Nations system. The UN WWAP, hosted by UNESCO, issued the first World Water Development Report in 2003 and the second in 2006.

All together form the UNESCO Water Family.

More information

 


Unicef

http://www.unicef.org/wes/index.html     http://www.unicef.org/  

We work in 190 countries through country programmes and National Committees. We are UNICEF, the United Nations Children’s Fund.

http://www.unicef.org/wash/index.html  :

UNICEF works in more than 90 countries around the world to improve water supplies and sanitation facilities in schools and communities, and to promote safe hygiene practices. We sponsor a wide range of activities and work with many partners, including families, communities, governments and like-minded organizations. In emergencies we provide urgent relief to communities and nations threatened by disrupted water supplies and disease. All UNICEF WASH programmes are designed to contribute to the Millennium Development Goal for water and sanitation: to halve, by 2015, the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe water and basic sanitation.

 

 

 

USAID

http://www.usaid.gov/

USAID is an independent federal government agency that receives overall foreign policy guidance from the Secretary of State. Our Work supports long-term and equitable economic growth and advances U.S. foreign policy objectives by supporting:

  • economic growth, agriculture and trade;
  • global health; and,
  • democracy, conflict prevention and humanitarian assistance.

We provide assistance in five regions of the world:

 

Objectives

USAID’s programs in natural resource management are closely linked with programs to improve health, increase agricultural productivity, mitigate or adapt to climate change, and even governance – in this case, governance of the environment.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

USAID’s natural resource management efforts focus on recognizing and sustaining aquatic ecosystem services as the foundation for further sustainable development. The agency explores opportunities to protect, restore and rehabilitate aquatic systems, and chooses interventions based on sound science and meaningful analysis of costs and benefits.

USAID’s work on water-related natural resources management includes:

  • Watershed Protection and River Basin Management
  • Coastal Zone Management
  • Freshwater Ecosystems Management

 

 


Water Advocates

http://www.wateradvocates.org/ 

 

Water Advocates is the first US-based nonprofit organization dedicated solely to increasing American support for worldwide access to safe, affordable and sustainable supplies of drinking water, adequate sanitation and hygiene (WASH).

Our purpose is advocacy, not implementation of projects. Water Advocates works with all sectors of American society to increase public and private-citizen funding for effective water, sanitation and hygiene projects and initiatives internationally, particularly those characterized by strong community involvement.   

 

Objectives

Water Advocates' mission is to advocate on behalf of those people who lack safe water-- specifically at least 5 gallons per person per day--and basic sanitation.

 

Water Advocates' chief goal is to increase U.S. public and private funding for safe, affordable and sustainable drinking-water supplies and adequate sanitation worldwide. Water Advocates neither implements projects nor seeks donations for itself, but works to raise contributions for the water and sanitation sector as a whole. Our specific goal is to significantly increase by 2010 the amount of funding available for efficient water and sanitation projects from the U.S. Government and private U.S. sources such as civic organizations, faith communities, businesses and philanthropic foundations.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

Press releases, New York Times advertisements, blogs.

 

 

 

Water Integrity Network

http://www.waterintegritynetwork.net/

 

Objectives

The overall development aim of WIN is to reduce poverty by fighting corruption. Improved governance of water resources and services, such as through enhanced integrity, transparency, accountability and honesty, increases the chances of sustainable and equitable use of water and the expansion and effective delivery of water supply and sanitation. The Network’s specific objectives are to:

  • Promote increased awareness and understanding of corruption issues related to water;
  • Improve the information and knowledge base and disseminate effective anti-corruption methodologies and best practices relevant for organizations working with water;
  • Support practical actions to fight corruption in water;
  • Develop monitoring mechanisms relating to corruption in water; and
  • Encourage and support enhanced capacity development of governments, civil society, private sector and all other interested parties to undertake and coordinate activities, advocate and work together against corruption in water.

 

Budget

The Water Integrity Network is funded by grants from the Governments of Germany (BMZ), Sweden (SIDA), Switzerland (SDC), and The Netherlands (DGIS). Additional support for Water Integrity Action is generated through cooperation with strategic partners and members at international, regional and country levels. 

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

WIN aims to stimulate and encourage anti-corruption initiatives on different levels. Local, national and international cross-sector coalitions made up of people from all sectors have worked together to improve integrity in the water sector. WIN collaborates with organizations and individuals that view anti-corruption measures as central to sustainable development, economic efficiency and social equality by forming country coalitions. More information about WIN's country coalitions can be found below.

http://www.waterintegritynetwork.net/page/2793/

 

 

 

Water For People

http://www.waterforpeople.org/?cvridirect=true

 

Water For People helps people in developing countries improve quality of life by supporting the development of locally sustainable drinking water resources, sanitation facilities, and hygiene education programs.

 

Its vision is a world where all people have access to safe drinking water and sanitation, a world where no one suffers or dies from a water- or sanitation-related disease. That vision is within reach and they hope you’ll join them. 

 

Objectives

Water For People works to build a world where all people have access to safe drinking water and sanitation, and where no one suffers or dies from a water- or sanitation-related disease. This is their vision.

Water For People works with people and partners to develop innovative and long-lasting solutions to the water, sanitation, and hygiene problems in the developing world. They strive to continually improve, to experiment with promising new ideas, and to leverage resources to multiply our impact.

FOUR GUIDING PRINCIPLES. ONE HUMAN NEED.

They believe in people:
They respect the dignity of all people.

They keep it local:
They believe that water, sanitation, and hygiene problems are most effectively solved using local resources.

They keep good company:
They search out trusted partners who share our vision and work together to build long-term relationships based on trust.

They keep our promises:
They believe we owe it to the communities we serve, our volunteers, staff, and donors to act with integrity and manage our resources effectively and efficiently.

 

Budget

Water For People appreciates the loyal support of all our donors, including individuals, businesses, organizations, and governments. A strong and generous donor base helps us further our mission throughout the developing world.

Water For People is proud of its continuing ability to increase funds spent on program activities. In 2006, 82 cents out of every dollar donated was allocated to international programs and our work in the field. In both 2008 and 2009 this percentage stayed above 80%. This positions Water For People as one of the most efficient nonprofits in operation. Charity Navigator has rated Water For People as a four-star charity for seven straight years.

Additionally, Water For People takes the idea of accountability seriously. From our guiding principle of "keep good company" to our efforts to monitor all our work in the field, to our program to internally audit our country programs in addition to external audits, we're serious about accountability. Water For People welcomes inquiries from prospective donors. For more detailed financial information, please click on the links below to download Water For People's current Audited Financial Statements and Form 990s.

Link for annual financial reports: http://www.waterforpeople.org/about/financials/ 

 

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

 

The organization continued to grow and improve through the late 1990s and early 2000s. In 2007, Water For People provided more than 108,000 beneficiaries with safe drinking water resources and/or improved sanitation facilities. In 2008 we provided over 184,000 beneficiaries with the same. That number grew again in 2009 to over 325,000.

The American Water Works Association (AWWA) has designated Water For People as its charity of choice. In addition to AWWA, the Water Environment Federation, the Water Quality Association, the National Association of Water Companies, the National Association of Clean Water Agencies, the Association of Metropolitan Water Agencies, and other sectors of the North American water community, including leading manufacturing and consulting engineering companies, endorse Water For People.

Water For People work on projects in Africa, Asia, Central and South America.

At the local level

Water For People works in collaboration with a variety of other organizations and groups on the ground. First, the community is the central player. They bring the government, private sector, development organizations, and others to the table. Each must play their role and contribute to the success of the community.

They involve local municipalities and private sector companies in the planning, funding, and implementation of projects to ensure long-lasting results. The Water For People country coordinator connects these partners with the communities who have expressed a desire to change their lives through water resources and improved sanitation.

The community must be willing to contribute in-kind labor and funding to the entire project but is also a driving force in planning, implementation, operations, maintenance, and repair. Water For People does not believe in sending engineers and volunteer laborers into a community to build systems. Instead, community members are trained to build and maintain systems and to collect tariffs for ongoing operations. Water For People uses only locally available materials should repairs be needed. This ensures that community members take ownership and have the ability to keep systems operational.

At the regional level

Many organizations work at a project level. People working to supply water at a single school or to build a latrine in a household. Both are worthwhile endeavors and help people. However, Water For People is dedicated to long-lasting solutions and a focus on full coverage within entire districts or municipalities. The impact of this work is twofold.

First, by covering an entire district their work has to take into account both the easy locations and the difficult locations to serve, because they must diligently plan out and implement total coverage.

Second, success in an entire municipality is a noticeable event for the private sector, government, and the communities themselves. This builds awareness of this possibility, success, and higher demand for total water and sanitation coverage in large areas.

By focusing on full coverage of water and sanitation in a region (of whatever size), Water For People shows that innovation applies not just to technology but to How We Work as well.

 

 

 

Water Partners International

http://water.org/ 

 

Water.org is a U.S.-based nonprofit organization committed to providing safe drinking water and sanitation to people in developing countries.

 

Objectives

Our Vision

We envision the day when everyone in the world can take a safe drink of water. It is easy to take for granted ready access to a safe supply of drinking water. Yet nearly one billion people lack this most basic commodity. Creating accessible, safe water supplies in developing countries liberates people to live healthier, fuller, more productive lives.

Our Mission

Water.org is challenging the traditional approach to assisting people in developing countries. Our goals are to draw attention to the world’s number one health problem, unsafe and inadequate water supplies, and to raise funds to help fight this immense problem – one community at a time.
Our mission is to inspire people to act:

  • Donors – to provide consistent financial resources with a sense of solidarity for those in need of safe water
  • Staff and volunteers – to seek innovative and efficient solutions to meeting the global water supply needs of today and tomorrow
  • People in need of safe water – to take the lead in meeting their own needs

Together, these people form the “waterpartnership” that will allow us to realize our vision.

Develop high quality, sustainable water projects. We use our expertise to foster high-quality, sustainable, community-level water supply projects. We promote innovative solutions that enable communities to take a leading role in solving their own water supply problems.

Enable donors to invest wisely. We exist to create a global awareness of the water supply crisis and to help people respond. We carefully invest donors’ funds in only the highest quality projects through locally-based water development organizations. We hold ourselves accountable to donors and to people who benefit from the projects they support.

 

Budget

Water.org is a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. Water.org meets the Council of Better Business Bureaus’ Standards for Charitable Solicitations, and holds the Independent Charities of America’s “Best in America” seal of excellence.

 

Link for annual financial reports: http://water.org/about/finance/   

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

Each day, people in developing countries must walk long distances to get the water they need for drinking, cooking and bathing. Often, this water is contaminated.

Since its inception in1990, Water.org had helped hundreds of communities in Africa, Asia, and Central America gain access to safe water and sanitation. All of the projects we support are self-sustaining, with organizational and financial structures in place to allow communities to independently operate and maintain them. Projects have an active water committee governing the operation of the water system, and users paying a water bill to cover the costs of operating and maintaining the water system.

Links to projects: http://water.org/projects/

 

 

 

WaterAid

http://www.wateraid.org/

 

WaterAid is an international non governmental organisation. Our mission is to transform lives by improving access to safe water, hygiene and sanitation in the world's poorest communities.

 

Objectives

Vision

WaterAid's vision is of a world where everyone has access to safe water and sanitation.

Mission 

WaterAid transforms lives by improving access to safe water, hygiene and sanitation in the world's poorest communities. We work with partners and influence decision-makers to maximise our impact.

What we do

WaterAid enables the world's poorest people to gain access to safe water and sanitation. Together with improved hygiene, these basic human rights underpin health, education and livelihoods, forming the first essential step in overcoming poverty.

We work with local partners, who understand local issues, and provide them with the skills and support to help communities set up and manage practical and sustainable projects that meet their real needs.

We also work locally and internationally to change policy and practice and ensure that water, hygiene and sanitation's vital role in reducing poverty is recognised.

The new strategy has been launched with a companion video (http://www.wateraid.org/international/about_us/strategy/default.asp ), explaining in more detail our four new global aims, which are:

  1. To promote and secure poor people's rights and access to safe water, improved hygiene and sanitation
  2. To support governments and service providers in developing their capacity to deliver safe water, improved hygiene and sanitation
  3. To advocate for the essential role of safe water, improved hygiene and sanitation in human development
  4. To further develop as an effective global organisation recognised as a leader in our field and for living our values

Budget

Financial review 2008-09

Income

Total annual income rose by 9% to £43.8 million.

 

 

 

£million

Donations and gifts

22.0

Legacies

2.3

Fundraising events

3.1

Grants (voluntary income)

1.8

Grants (restricted)

12.5

Other

2.1

 

 

 

Promotion in the Water Sector 

WaterAid now works in 26 countries in Africa, Asia and the Pacific region to improve their quality of life through lasting improvements to water, sanitation and hygiene education using local skills and practical, sustainable technologies.

Links to the projects in various countries: http://www.wateraid.org/international/what_we_do/where_we_work/default.asp

 

 

 

 

World Business Council On Sustainable Development

http://www.wbcsd.org/templates/TemplateWBCSD5/layout.asp?MenuID=1

 

The World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) is a CEO-led, global association of some 200 companies dealing exclusively with business and sustainable development.

The Council provides a platform for companies to explore sustainable development, share knowledge, experiences and best practices, and to advocate business positions on these issues in a variety of forums, working with governments, non-governmental and intergovernmental organizations.

Members are drawn from more than 30 countries and 20 major industrial sectors. The Council also benefits from a global network of some 60 national and regional business councils and regional partners.

 

Objectives

The Council’s objectives are to:

  • Be a leading business advocate on sustainable development;
  • Participate in policy development to create the right framework conditions for business to make an effective contribution to sustainable human progress;
  • Develop and promote the business case for sustainable development;
  • Demonstrate the business contribution to sustainable development solutions and share leading edge practices among members;
  • Contribute to a sustainable future for developing nations and nations in transition.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

The Council focuses on four key areas:

In addition, we have projects and initiatives covering the following topics:

Links to water related projects: http://www.wbcsd.org/templates/TemplateWBCSD5/layout.asp?type=p&MenuId=ODI&doOpen=1&ClickMenu=LeftMenu

 

 

 

World Commission on Dams

http://www.unep.org/dams/WCD/  

Brokered by the World Bank and the World Conservation Union (IUCN), the World Commission on Dams (WCD) was established in May 1998 in response to the escalating local and international controversies over large dams. It was mandated to:

  • review the development effectiveness of large dams and assessed alternatives for water resources and energy development; and
  • develop internationally acceptable criteria, guidelines and standards for the planning, design, appraisal, construction, operation, monitoring and decommissioning of dams.

The World Commission on Dams published its final report, entitled Dams and Development: a new framework for decision-making, in November 2000. The report is widely acknowledged as a significant contribution to the debate on dams, not only on the benefits and costs of large dams, but more generally to the current rethinking of development decision-making in a world deeply affected by rapid global change. In particular, its recommendation that decisions on major infrastructure developments take place within a framework that recognizes the rights of all stakeholders, and the risks that each stakeholder group is asked, or obliged to sustain, has been regarded as shifting the dams debate onto a new plane.

 

Objectives

Vision

The development and management of water and energy resources address the full range of options and are attained through institutionalised participatory and transparent decision-making processes to achieve sustainable outcomes that benefit all.

Mission 

Promote improved decision-making, planning and management of dams and their alternatives building on the World Commission on Dams core values and strategic priorities and other relevant reference materials through promoting multistakeholder dialogue at national, regional and global levels and producing non-prescriptive tools to help decision-makers.

The WCD's success is premised on a high degree of 'buy-in' by all interest groups in the dams debate. The Commission's mandate specifies that financial contributions should be sought from the public and private sectors as well as from civil society - essentially creating a new funding model for international commissions.

This funding strategy has been bedevilled by reluctance about the WCD's 'no-strings-attached' clause; scepticism about the Commission's chances of success; the suspicions and acrimonies associated with the dams debate; government donors' lengthy decision-making cycle; private sector's reluctance to invest in a process with no direct returns; and the chronic cash shortages of the NGO community.

However, by June 2000, 51 contributors had pledged funds equal to more than three-quarters of the Commission's total projected budget of about US$9,9 million. In fact more than half that amount was pledged in the first five months of the Commission's existence. Commitments came from NGOs, the private sector, governments in both the North and South, and multilateral agencies.

For an international commission that operates independent of governments, financing institutions, and interest groups, this may be an unprecedented model for international commissions. But perhaps the most significant aspect of this level of financial commitment, representing such diverse sources, is the extent to which it presents clear evidence of international interest in the WCD' s mandate and objectives.

The World Bank - itself an early contributor - has created a special Trust Fund account to facilitate multilateral contributions by governments and development agencies.

One of the WCD's most significant breakthroughs has been the approval of a United Nations Foundation partnership grant to the WCD and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). Governments, led by Germany and Norway, have so far committed US$3,5 million. They include Australia, Canada, China, Denmark, Finland, Ireland, Japan, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States of America. Corporate pledges so far total $893 000, led by ABB, as well as Hydro Quebec and ENRON. Substantial commitments have also been received from Siemens and Atlas Copco, as well as consultancy firms such as Harza Engineering, which assisted the WCD with its corporate fundraising efforts.

Commitments have also been made from the civil society sector. Thus far, the US-based C.S. MOTT Foundation, the Goldman Environmental Foundation, the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and the US National Wildlife Federation have pledged financial contributions to the WCD.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

The Dams and Development Project (DDP) was a time bound project hosted by UNEP financed with contributions of donor countries. A multistakeholder Steering Committee representing the wider Dams and Development Forum provided guidance to UNEP on project substantive matters. The DDP was established in November 2001 in response to a request of the Third Forum meeting of the World Commission on Dams (WCD) for a neutral entity to take forward the consideration of the WCD recommendations into local contexts through promoting inclusive multi-stakeholder dialogue and, widely disseminating the WCD materials. In this regard, Phase 1, which extended until July 2004, was therefore mainly devoted to promoting dialogue at national, regional and global levels on the basis of WCD core values and strategic priorities; widely disseminating the WCD materials in English and other languages and exchanging information about WCD institutional and dialogue follow up activities. Based on the outcomes and experience of Phase 1, the focus of the Phase 2, launched in February 2005 and completed in 2007, shifted to promoting improved decision-making, planning and management of dams. The national, regional and global dialogues continue to be promoted, now as an avenue for producing broad based recommendations on policy and procedure reforms in the local context. In addition, the project was tasked with the production of non prescriptive practical tools to help decision makers. Networking, communication and dissemination continue to be ongoing activities in support the main objectives

Link to the WCD website: http://www.dams.org/ 

 

 

 

World Toilet Organization

http://www.worldtoilet.org/

 

World Toilet Organization (WTO) is a global non-profit organization committed to improving toilet and sanitation conditions worldwide. WTO is also one of the few organizations to focus on toilets instead of water, which receives more attention and resources under the common subject of sanitation. Founded in 2001 with 15 members, it now has 235 member organizations in 58 countries working towards eliminating the toilet taboo and delivering sustainable sanitation.

WTO was created as a global network and service platform wherein all toilet and sanitation organizations can learn from one another and leverage on media and global support that in turn can influence governments to promote sound sanitation and public health policies.

 

Objectives

Instead of seeing 2.5 billion toilet-less as underprivileged and helpless people, WTO visualizes 2.5 billion of potential customers demanding safe and affordable toilets. WTO is driving a market-based approach to address the dysfunctional sanitation market for the poor.

Dependence on donations is not enough to address the problem of such vast magnitude and scale. Further, toilet promotion on health reasons has not motivated poor to invest in toilets. WTO aims to emotionally connect with poor by branding toilets as status symbol and an object of desire. WTO is building an efficient market infrastructure wherein poor demands and there are products and services available to service them.

An alternative and a radical approach to accelerate accomplishing the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) target to reduce by half the proportion of the 2.5 billion people without access to basic sanitation by 2015.

We aim to achieve this through:

  • Advocacy and Awareness: Breaking the taboo on toilet and sanitation to make it a mainstream subject for improvement
  • World Toilet College: Capacity Building and Training to help people help themselves and others
  • Offer Networking Platform and Knowledge Management Hub
  • Building an Efficient Market Infrastructure for Sanitation
  • Demonstration of Sanitation Projects
  • Create Financing Tools through partnership with financial experts
  • Events: e.g. World Toilet Summit, World Toilet Day (November 19)

 

Budget

WTO is a Schwab Foundation Social Entrepreneur and an Ashoka Global Fellow. WTO was recently appointed to the World Economic Forum's Global Agenda Council on Water Security.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

WTO is the organizer of the very successful series of World Toilet Summits and World Toilet Expo and Forum. To-date, 9 World Toilet Summits and 2 World Toilet Expo & Forum have been hosted in 10 different cities around the world. Each summit addresses the critical issues of toilet and sanitation from technologies, development, funding, to design, maintenance, social entrepreneurship, capacity building, research and various other related topics, creating massive media coverage and momentum.

WTO also declared its founding day of November 19 as "World Toilet Day" and this is now being celebrated by members all over the world. Thus increasing awareness and generating local action for better sanitation.

In 2005, WTO started the world's first World Toilet College (WTC) providing training in toilet design, maintenance, School Sanitation and Disaster Sanitation and implementation of Sustainable Sanitation systems. WTO is also one of the founding members of the Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSana), a coalition of 50 prominent organizations to promote sustainable sanitation systems.

In 2006, the Schwab Foundation, a family of the World Economic Forum, awarded the Outstanding Social Entrepreneur of the Year to WTO and made its founder a Schwab Foundation permanent fellow. In 2007, WTO was honored as an Ashoka Global Fellow for its excellence in social entrepreneurship.

In addition to advocacy, capacity building and sanitation projects, WTO is now driving a market-based strategy to address the dysfunctional sanitation market for the poor, by installing efficient market infrastructure. 

 

 

 

World Water Council

http://www.worldwatercouncil.org/ 

 

The World Water Council is an international multi-stakeholder platform. It was established in 1996 on the initiative of renowned water specialists and international organizations, in response to an increasing concern about world water issues from the global community.

 

Objectives

The World Water Council's mission is "to promote awareness, build political commitment and trigger action on critical water issues at all levels, including the highest decision-making level, to facilitate the efficient conservation, protection, development, planning, management and use of water in all its dimensions on an environmentally sustainable basis for the benefit of all life on earth."

By providing a platform to encourage debates and exchanges of experience, the Council aims to reach a common strategic vision on water resources and water services management amongst all stakeholders in the water community. In the process, the Council also catalyses initiatives and activities, whose results converge toward its flagship product, the World Water Forum.

The Council's action for the triennial period until 2006 is oriented in priority towards four areas that are meant to support and advance the water-related UN Millennium Development Goals. They are:

- Water, Human Rights and Politics

- Water, Institutions and Financing Capacity

- Water Services and Infrastructure

- Water and Environment

To fulfill its mission, the Council concentrates its influence on three main areas:

- Politics and power structures

- Development and improvement of policies and institutions

- Implementation and impact of policies

Among the wide range of activities carried out in order to achieve its objectives, the main Council event is the World Water Forum, which takes place once every three years. The Council also supports various dialogues, including cross-cutting ones, monitoring programs, workshops, publications, etc. All the Council's activities are conducted through committees, working groups and task forces, under the responsibility of the Board of Governors.

Through its wide membership of organizations throughout the world, the Council spreads information about the policy development processes it carries out in leading political, scientific and technical domains, in addition to practical perspectives and knowledge.

The Council, as an umbrella organization, follows three working principles:

  • It restricts itself to policy-related issues and addresses other issues only if they are cross-cutting or controversial;
  • It plays the role of facilitator for cross-cutting programs and does not do work that could be done by its members;
  • It cooperates with its members to identify the policy implications of their work and helps them to develop and promote these implications.

The Council is financed primarily through membership fees and additional support is provided by the host City of Marseilles. Specific projects and programs are financed through donations and grants from governments, international organizations and NGO's.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector 

March 1997 - The success of the First World Water Forum in Marrakech, Morocco, and the issuing of the Marrakech Declaration firmly established the leadership of the Council in water affairs.
The World Water Council received the mandate to develop the World Water Vision for Life and Environment for the 21st Century.

September 1997 - The First Meeting of the General Assembly of members of the World Water Council was held in Montreal, during the Ninth World Water Congress of the IWRA. The Constitution of the Council was approved and the members of the first Board of Governors were elected.

March 1998 - The World Water Council, in cooperation with the Government of France, participated in organizing the International Conference on Water and Sustainable Development in Paris.

March 2000 - The Second World Water Forum, was successfully held in The Netherlands. The results of the Vision were presented to some 5,700 participants from all parts of the world. The Ministerial Conference gathered 120 Ministers and resulted in the Declaration of The Hague on Water Security in the 21st Century.

March 2003 - The Third World Water Forum took place in Kyoto, Shiga and Osaka, Japan. Following up on its commintments from the 2nd Forum, the WWC launched the World Water Actions report, an inventory of over 3,000 local water actions. This Forum was the largest water conference in history, gathering 24,000 participants. A Ministerial Conference was held in parallel and brought together 130 Ministers. Participants made hundreds of commitments to action, and each session organizer was asked to state what concrete output would follow his or her respective session.

March 2006 - The Fourth World Water Forum was held in Mexico City, gathering some 20,000 people from throughout the world who participated in 206 working sessions, under the theme "local actions for a global challenge".

 

 

 

Acacia Water

http://www.acaciawater.com/

 

Acacia Water “for solutions in groundwater” was established in 2003 at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences). Acacia Water focuses on groundwater in relation to surface water, environment and infrastructure. This varies from implementation of field measurements and model calculations, to giving training and strategic advice. Acacia distinguishes itself by the cooperation with the University, as a result of which Acacia Water has access to the latest scientific developments in the field of hydrology and environment. We translate this knowledge to innovative and practical solutions.

The strength of Acacia Water is the specialization in the field of groundwater, while at the same time being able to place issues in a broader perspective and to link up with other fields of action. As a result we often work in a multidisciplinary environment with a broad variety of expertise.

The Acacia team exists of passionate and enthusiastic groundwater experts. In the past five years our expertise has been made available to a large range of clients, including the World Bank, UNESCO, UNICEF, the EU and national governments. In the Netherlands our main clients are waterboards, water supply companies and local- and regional governments. By continuing our involvement in international projects, particularly in the field of rural water supply, Acacia water continues to give content to its social responsibility.

 

 

 

Agence Francaise de Developpement 

http://www.afd.fr/jahia/Jahia/home

 

AFD is the Groupe Agence Française de Développement, a bi-lateral development finance institution established in 1941 that works on behalf of the French government.  Its mission is to finance development according to France’s Overseas Development Assistance policies.

AFD’s activities are aimed at reducing poverty and inequalities, promoting sustainable economic growth, and protecting “Global Public Goods” of benefit to all humanity. Protecting Global Public Goods includes the fight against climate change and pandemics; the preservation of biodiversity; the promotion of social and environmental responsibility; as well as aid to countries weakened by strife, war and natural disasters.  

AFD’s actions in favor of economic growth and preservation of the environment fall directly within the framework of the United Nation’s Millennium Development Goals, which was set out in 2000 and seeks to reduce global poverty by half by the year 2015.

 

Objectives

As a bilateral development bank and the central operator of France’s foreign aid policy, AFD’s activities on five continents are aimed at reducing poverty and inequalities, financial sustainable economic growth and protecting “Global Public Goods” of benefit to all humanity.  AFD activities fall within the framework of the United Nations’ Millennium Development Goals.

Protecting Global Public Goods includes the fight against climate change and pandemics; the preservation of biodiversity; the promotion of social and environmental responsibility; as well as aid to countries weakened by strife, war and natural disasters.
  
AFD uses a wide range of financial instruments to underwrite its funding activities: grants, subsidies, guarantees, loans, equity shareholdings, co-financing and local bank intermediation. The types of assistance AFD provides funding for includes:

  • micro, small and medium-sized enterprise funding
  • public budget support
  • infrastructure construction
  • urban and rural development
  • health and education
  • war and disaster relief
  • social cohesion and environmental responsibility
  • research and training
  • technical assistance and capacity building

 

Budget

Being a public institution wholly State-owned, the Agence française de développement is also, under the Monetary and Financial French Code, a specialized financial institution subject to all the obligations of the banking regulation, in particular risk management and internal control.

It raises a significant part of its ressources on the financial markets, mainly through bonds issues, ranging from 500 million euros to 1 billion euros a year.

Links for annual financial reports: http://www.afd.fr/jahia/Jahia/lang/en/home/finances

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

AFD – which works in developing countries to reduce poverty by facilitating access to essential services – devotes an average of 20% of its total contributions to improving access to drinking water and sanitation.

AFD supports a wide range of activities in the sector, including: support for policies related to water supply and governance; integrated management of water resources; supply of drinking water for domestic and industrial use in rural and urban areas; domestic and industrial waste water treatment throughout the cycle (collection, treatment, and recovery of by-products); and storm water runoff treatment.

AFD’s contribution to the French government’s endeavour to double aid for the water sector is reflected in its 2009 funding goal of €290 million, half of which is earmarked for Africa. These objectives have been met for 2007.

In developing countries, €317 million has been earmarked, half for drinking water and half for sanitation, including €57 million in grants, €99 million in sovereign loans, and €161 million in non-sovereign loans. African countries are the primary target of AFD aid, receiving 57% of the total amount, accounting for €180 million in new commitments.

This funding will provide access to drinking water for about 4 million people and sanitation services for about 1.7 million in developing countries.

 

 

African Ministerial Council on Water (AMCOW)

http://www.amcow.org/

 

 

AquaFed

http://www.aquafed.org/   http://www.aquafed.org/pdf/Aquafed_Leaflet_2006-03.pdf

 

AquaFed® is an association set up to connect international organisations with private sector providers of water and sanitation services. It does this on the international scene, representing the operators through direct membership or through their national associations. AquaFed membership is open to all privately controlled companies irrespective of their size or location.

 

Objectives

1.      To provide a channel between private water and wastewater service providers and key international stakeholders.

2.      To contribute to solving the world’s water problems by working with the international community and sharing the expertise of the private operators.

3.      To promote the option of private sector participation in water and wastewater management as a solution that public authorities can choose.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector


Private water operators have been instrumental in helping to shape and raise

awareness of water issues around the world. Partnerships with the private sector

are one of the motors for progress and development in water and sanitation.

Until now, private water operators as a body have not been represented

at the international level. Public institutions, governments and other interested

international parties have lacked a way to communicate with the sector as

a whole, being limited to ad hoc contacts with individual companies or to third

party information.

The creation of AquaFed answers a real demand from international

organisations. It also provides private water operators around the world

with an organisation that represents them.

Through AquaFed, private service operators will be able to collaborate jointly

with other stakeholders in order to find practical solutions to water issues

facing the world: better service provision, economic development, improved

health and living conditions, poverty alleviation and climate change impacts,

to name but a few.

AquaFed currently brings together over 200 water and wastewater service

providers from more than 30 countries around the world. It is becoming

the natural representative and point of contact between the private water operators’ industry and international organisations.

 

AquaFed is an industry representative that communicates with the:

 1. United Nations

 2.World Bank and other Multilateral Financial Institutions

 3. European institutions

 4. Major NGOs

 5. Intergovernmental and international conferences

AquaFed contributes to international debates on water-related

problems. It constructively supports and offers ideas to assist

the international community in meeting these challenges.

AquaFed focuses on problems in the field by taking advantage

of members’:

 1.Practical experience and lessons learned

 2. Know-how and technology

 3. Ability to innovate

The worldwide footprint of private sector operators is often

overestimated. At the same time the significant contribution

of private sector operators to public health and sustainable

development is greatly underestimated by the international

community.

AquaFed works to close this gap by:

 1. Drafting common positions and messages

 2. Promoting industry results and performance

 3. Contributing through AquaFed members to sustainable

development and to meeting the UN Millenium Development Goals

 

 

Asian Development Group

http://www.adb.org/Water/default.asp

 

ADB is an international development finance institution whose mission is to help its developing member countries reduce poverty and improve the quality of life of their people.

Headquartered in Manila, and established in 1966, ADB is owned and financed by its 67 members, of which 48 are from the region and 19 are from other parts of the globe.

ADB's main partners are governments, the private sector, nongovernment organizations, development agencies, community-based organizations, and foundations.

Under Strategy 2020, a long-term strategic framework adopted in 2008, ADB will follow three complementary strategic agendas: inclusive growth, environmentally sustainable growth, and regional integration.

In pursuing its vision, ADB's main instruments comprise loans, technical assistance, grants, advice, and knowledge.

Although most lending is in the public sector - and to governments - ADB also provides direct assistance to private enterprises of developing countries through equity investments, guarantees, and loans. In addition, its triple-A credit rating helps mobilize funds for development.

 

Objectives 

Strategy 2020: The Long-Term Strategic Framework of the Asian Development Bank 2008-2020, approved by ADB's Board of Directors on 7 April 2008, is the paramount ADB-wide strategic framework to guide all its operations to 2020. Strategy 2020 reaffirms both ADB's vision of an Asia and Pacific free of poverty [PDF] and its mission to help developing member countries improve the living conditions and quality of life of their people.

Strategy 2020 identifies drivers of change that will be stressed in all its operations—developing the private sector, encouraging good governance, supporting gender equity, helping developing countries gain knowledge, and expanding partnerships with other development institutions the private sector, and with community-based organizations.

By 2012, 80% of ADB lending will be in five core operational areas, identified as comparative strengths of ADB:

  • Infrastructure, including transport and communications, energy, water supply and sanitation and urban development
  • Environment
  • Regional cooperation and integration
  • Finance sector development
  • Education

ADB will continue to operate in health, agriculture, and disaster and emergency assistance, but on a more selective basis.

 

Budget

Carrying a triple-A credit rating, ADB raises funds through bond issues on the world's capital markets. It also utilizes its members' contributions and retained earnings from lending operations. These sources comprise ADB's ordinary capital resources and account for 74.1% of lending to ADB's developing member countries.

Loans are also provided from Special Funds Resources - financed mostly from contributions of donor members for ADB's concessional loan and technical assistance programs.

How ADB's Assistance is Financed

Ordinary Capital Resources: These are a pool of funds available for ADB's lending operations, replenished by borrowings from the world's capital markets. OCR loans are offered at near-market terms to better-off borrowing countries.

Asian Development Fund: Funded by ADB's donor member countries, ADF offers loans at very low interest rates and grants that help reduce poverty in ADB's poorest borrowing countries. Read more about ADF's Impact

Technical Assistance: Assists countries in identifying and designing projects, improving institutions, formulating development strategies, or fostering regional cooperation. TA can be financed by grants, or - more rarely - loans through ADB's central budget or a number of special funds provided by ADB's donor members.

Innovation and Efficiency Initiative - Financing Instruments and Modalities: In 2005, new financing instruments and modalities were introduced under IEI. These new financing instruments are intended to provide ADB clients and operational teams with additional alternatives to help finance development projects.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

“Water for All” is the Asian Development Bank’s vision and policy for the Asia and Pacific region. ADB’s Water Financing Program works to increase investments and support reforms in rural water, urban water, and river basin water.

Investing in Urban Water

If cities are the engines of a country's economic growth, then water is the oil that keeps those engines running. Common among many Asian cities, though, is the fact that water shortages and pollution are stunting growth.

Growing cities in Asia need more water supply and improved sanitation to sustain the urban economy, livelihoods, and overall quality of city life.

When cities have access to safe drinking water and sanitation, its people are healthier and more productive economically. Improved sanitation protects the poor from health risks and translates to major economic gains from tourism revenues and health care savings, among others.

ADB's Water Financing Program is doubling investments in water supply, sanitation and wastewater management, and environmental improvement in Asian cities.

Investing in Rural Water

Postcard snapshots of tranquil Asian rural scenes can be deceptive—golden harvests, stately mountains, smiling faces. Reality is much harsher, made more so by the lack of water for irrigating agricultural fields, better drainage to prevent floods, or clean drinking water and sanitation facilities in people's homes.

Governments and private-sector investors tend to give these kinds of improvements low priority, likely because of perceived low returns on investments. However, the return is huge for the individuals who are spared from dry fields, floods, hours of walking for water, and unsanitary environments around their home.

ADB's Water Financing Program 2006-2010 promotes investments in water supply and sanitation, and irrigation and drainage to improve health and livelihoods in Asia's rural communities.

Investing in Basin Water

Increased flooding upstream, more frequent droughts downstream, agricultural encroachment on wetlands, reduced agricultural production, and declining biodiversity—these are just some of the problems faced by many of Asia’s river basins.

To address these problems, governments and communities are introducing new ways of managing and sharing water resources. These include formulating the basic legal framework that determines who has the authority to manage the basin and setting up institutions—from river basin organizations to committees to water user groups—that help integrate and manage the multiple demands on the river’s resources.

ADB recognizes that Asia’s river basins need to be managed in integrated ways that promote equitable sharing of water resources while preserving the environment. It promotes investments in the infrastructure and management of water regulation and hydropower facilities, flood management, and watershed and wetlands conservation.

ADB’s Water Financing Program targets the introduction of integrated water resources management in 25 river basins across the region.

 

– March 2009   - The Federation participates in the 5th World Water Forum

AquaFed participates in the 5th World Water Forum, March 16-22 2009 in Istanbul; Turkey (http://www.worldwaterforum5.org). The theme is "Bridging Divides for Water". AquaFed is involved at various levels:

-

March 18, 2009: AquaFed Press Release: "Bridging the real water divide between haves and have-nots. More ambition, more projects, no limitations that slow progress" (English PDF; French PDF; Turkish PDF)

-

AquaFed is a member of "Business Action for Water" (BAW - http://www.businessactionforwater.org/). Initially developed and rolled-out for the UN Commission on Sustainable Development in 2004 and 2005, this renewed version of Business Action for Water aims to both represent business at the Forum and be the platform to facilitate business input.

-

AquaFed is part of the Theme 5 Finance Coordination Group and Topic Coordinator for Topic 5.1. - "Sustainable Local Finance". More information from the Virtual Meeting Space of the World Water Forum.

-

Quotes by Gérard Payen (PDF)

-

March 18, 2009: AquaFed organised Session 5.1.1. - "Financial Sustainability: Importance, progress and emerging issues."

  • Presentation by Gérard Payen: "Progress since the Camdessus Panel and the Gurria Task Force" (PDF)
  • Session 5.1.1. Final Scoping Document (PDF)
  • Preliminary Conclusions (PDF)

 

 

 

Asia-Pacific Water Forum

http://www.apwf.org/

 

The APWF is an independent, not-for-profit, non-partisan, non-political network. APWF will be inclusive, open and flexible, with an appropriate governance superstructure and an optimal delegation of responsibility to the contributing member organizations for the delivery of agreed products and services of high quality and practical value.

 

Objectives


The goal of the APWF is to contribute to sustainable water management in order to achieve the targets of the MDGs in Asia and the Pacific by capitalizing on the region's diversity and rich history of experience in dealing with water as a fundamental part of the human existence. Specifically, the APWF shall champion efforts aimed at boosting investments, building capacity, and enhancing cooperation in the water sector at the regional level and beyond.

To achieve this goal, APWF will provide countries and organizations in the Asia-Pacific region with a common platform and voice in articulating the region’s strategies and promoting its achievements in solving water problems, including meeting the necessary investment requirements. For this purpose, APWF will comprise a well-coordinated network of member organizations that are able and willing to voluntarily commit their resources in order to deliver high quality products and services that meet the priority needs of policy and decision-makers and practitioners in the water sector. APWF will add value to the ongoing work of organizations and initiatives in the water sector in terms of investment, optimizing implementation arrangements, achieving economies of scale, and developing unified approaches to water policies and programs.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector


The approach of the APWF's network organization will be to add value to the ongoing work of organizations and initiatives in the water sector in terms of investment, optimizing implementation arrangements, achieving economies of scale, and developing unified approaches to water policies and programs. It will be inclusive, open and flexible, with a very light governance superstructure and an optimal delegation of responsibility to the contributing member organizations for the delivery of agreed products and services of high quality and practical value.

The Regional Document prepared for the 4th World Water Forum identified three Priority Themes common across the Asia-Pacific region. Adopting strategies and initiating actions needed to address these themes will be the main focus of APWF activities leading up to the 1st Asia-Pacific Water Summit.

 

The actions required to make progress under each of the Priority Themes have been divided into five categories, or "Key Result Areas" (KRAs). APWF will provide top-quality and user-friendly network coordination services, including a first-class interactive website, to showcase activities and results in each of the KRAs and to facilitate the necessary linkages among the KRAs as they relate to the Priority Themes.

 

 


Consortium for Dissemination of DEWATS (CDD) 

http://www.borda-sa.org/modules/cjaycontent/index.php?id=3

 

BORDA was founded in 1977 as a not-for-profit organisation in Bremen, Germany. Since 1979, BORDA has been working in India with local partners to implement and disseminate sustainable solutions to the related problems of poverty and environmental degradation. Through integration of appropriate eco-friendly technology into a holistic framework including technical, social, economic and environmental components, BORDA facilitates:
- Basic need service provision to urban, peri-urban and rural populations, and
- Technical support to small and medium sized enterprises, institutions, settlements and communities.

 

Objectives

To improve the livelihoods of disadvantaged groups within societies and to sustain the functioning of eco-systems through dissemination of demand oriented Basic-Needs-Services in the fields of decentralized sanitation, water- and energy supply as well as solid waste- and wastewater management.

“Facilitating Basic Needs Services -
thinking long-term, acting now !”

BORDA’s mission

Conventional local and governmental water supply concepts have failed to respond to the specific needs and conditions of the target population in remote mountainous areas. Therefore, BORDA seeks to bridge this deficiency by

  • implementing demand based service provider concepts for decentralised water supply with demonstration projects
  • disseminating this approach in cooperation with various stakeholders

 

Promotion in the water sector

The willingness of the target group to actively participate in the project realisation is essential for the sustainability of these measures and is precondition for project implementation. In order to assure sustained access to vital resources, BORDA incorporates only environmentally friendly technologies and the utilisation of renewable energy into the technology selection process.

Portfolio

• Knowledge and Quality Management
• Decentralized Water Supply
• Decentralized Energy Supply
• Decentralized Wastewater Treatment
• Community Based Sanitation
• Decentralized Solid Waste Management


Target Regions & Donors Network

• BORDA- South Asia facilitates basic –needs service projects in 9 States of India and neighbouring regions. Projects in more States and neighbouring regions are planned.
• BORDA- South Asia and its partners have been contracted as expert organisations by the international institutions such as GTZ, AusAid, CEU, InWEnt as well as national and local Governments.
• BORDA- South Asia programs are financially supported by the Federal Republic of Germany, the Commissions of the European Union, the Free Hanseatic City of Bremen and Federal Association of Workers’ Welfare Organisations (AWO).

Co-operation Network

• BORDA-SA supports a development co-operation network that consists of 13 partner organisations employing more than 100 development experts who facilitate basic needs service projects.
• BORDA-SA Project office is responsible for the co-ordination of projects, providing strategies and solutions and knowledge and quality management and act as catalysts to integrate the partner-network in a wider national sector network to ensure the anticipated dissemination and impact of supported measures.

 

 

 

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ)

http://gtz.de/en/

 

The Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) is a federally owned organisation. We work worldwide in the field of international cooperation for sustainable development. Our mandate is to support the German Government in achieving its development objectives. We provide viable, forward-looking solutions for political, economic, ecological and social development in a globalised world. Sometimes working under difficult conditions, we promote complex reforms and change processes. Our corporate objective is to improve people’s lives on a sustainable basis.   

 

Objectives

The GTZ works on a broad range of specialised topics. More information is available on the pages that follow in this section:

Good Governance

Democracy and rule of law, decentralisation, corruption, public finance.

Rural development 

Rural economic development, management of natural resources, land management, rural services, food security. 

Sustainable infrastructure

Energy, forward-looking construction, transport, water.

Social development

Health and population, education, HIV/AIDS, social protection

Environment and climate change

Climate change, environmental policy and institutional development, managing natural resources, urban and industrial environmental management.

Economic development and employment

Economic policy, vocational training, private sector, ICT and economy, financial systems, globalization.

Cross-sectoral themes

Gender, crisis prevention, youth, HIV/AIDS control, emergency aid, poverty, food and nutrition security, Rio+10, PPP, Social and Ecological Standards.

Promotion in the Water Sector

GTZ advises developing countries on how to manage their water resources fairly, efficiently and sustainably. With the help of our partners, we aim to reduce extreme poverty and develop structures that facilitate and encourage sustainable development.

The main areas of GTZ’s work in this field are:.

  • Advisory services for governments on shaping water policy
  • Supporting water management reform
  • Developing and improving regulation systems
  • Promoting sustainable water supply and sanitation
  • Support for transboundary water management and cooperation

For further information go to:

http://www.gtz.de/en/themen/3625.htmhttp://www.gtz.de/en/themen/8524.htm

 

 

DFID 

http://www.dfid.gov.uk/mdg/environment.asp

 

DFID is the part of the UK government that manages Britain's aid to poor countries and works to get rid of extreme poverty. As well as headquarters in London and East Kilbride, near Glasgow, DFID has offices in around 40 developing countries and provides aid to around 90 countries.

We are working to reach the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the international targets agreed by the United Nations (UN) to halve world poverty by 2015.

We work with governments of developing countries as well as charities, businesses and international bodies, including the World Bank, UN agencies and the European Commission. All our partners share our ambition to achieve the MDGs.

In 2008/09 we provided £5.5 billion of aid to poorer countries. Our budget will increase to £7.8 billion by 2010/11. By 2013, the equivalent of 0.7% of the UK’s gross national income will be dedicated to development assistance, from 0.36% in 2007/08.

 

Objectives


We deliver UKaid in many different ways so that it works effectively in different environments.

We continually monitor how we deliver aid so that more goes where it is needed. If we become aware of obstacles in a country, such as corruption or human rights abuses, we may stop our aid or change the way we deliver it.

Most UKaid from DFID goes to developing countries either directly or through an international body. In 2008/09, 27% went directly to governments, to spend on the priorities they set themselves for helping their citizens out of poverty.

Almost a third of UKaid goes to international bodies for their own activities in developing countries. Activities include work on healthcare, education and economic growth. The main recipients are:

  • the European Commission
  • the World Bank
  • the United Nations
  • the Global Fund to Fight Aids, TB and Malaria.

UKaid is also provided to charities. These include international charities like Oxfam, VSO and Action Aid and charities based in developing countries. Individual charities decide how to use this support, but all have audit systems in place, agreed with us, to ensure that aid is used effectively.

We also provide UKaid directly to development projects on the ground. In most cases, we work with one or more development organisations (mainly non-governmental organisations).

In response to humanitarian crises, UKaid is provided to charities and international bodies or directly to the countries affected.

But our work is about more than aid. We also aim to influence governments and organisations to work to reduce poverty.

The publication Statistics on International Development (see link below) sets out how we have worked over the last financial year to fight world poverty.

DFID works with:

 

 

Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs (DGIS)

http://www.minbuza.nl/en/home

 

 

European Commission (EC)

http://ec.europa.eu/index_en.htm#

 

The Directorate-General for the Environment is one of the more than 40 Directorates-General and services that make up the European Commission. Commonly referred to as DG Environment, the objective of the Directorate-General is to protect, preserve and improve the environment for present and future generations. To achieve this it proposes policies that ensure a high level of environmental protection in the European Union and that preserve the quality of life of EU citizens.

The DG makes sure that Member States correctly apply EU environmental law. In doing so it investigates complaints made by citizens and non-governmental organisations and can take legal action if it is deems that EU law has been infringed. In certain cases DG Environment represents the European Union in environmental matters at international meetings such as the United Nations Convention on Biodiversity.

The DG also finances projects that contribute to environmental protection in the EU. Since 1992 some 2,600 projects have received some financing from LIFE, the EU's financial instrument for the environment.

Every year the Directorate General makes public its priorities for the upcoming year and also publishes a yearly report on the preceding year's policy initiatives. 

 

Objectives

Improving environmental management at the European Commission

Since 2002 DG Environment and four other Commission services (OIB, DG HR, DIGIT and SG) have taken part in a pilot project to improve the Commission's environmental performance through  the implementation of an environmental management system in line with the EMAS  regulation . From 2002 to 2008, electricity and water consumption have gone down by 14 and 22% respectively. Emissions of CO2 have also decreased (7%) and so has the amount of waste generated (11%). By mid-2008 nearly half of Commission staff used public transport such as busses, trams, metro or the train. Following the positive results of this pilot phase it was decided to extend  the EMAS  system  to the whole Commission, starting in January 2010.

Promotion in the Water Sector

The European Commission works on:

  • River Basin Management
  • Marine, Environment and Coasts
  • Flood Risk Management
  • Water Scarcity and Droughts
  • Drinking Water
  • Bathing Water
  • Water Pollution
  • EU Water Initiative
  • Water and Adaptation

For further info on the programmes go to: http://ec.europa.eu/environment/water/index_en.htm

 

 

 

The global Public-Private Partnership for Handwashing with Soap (PPPHW)

http://www.globalhandwashing.org/ 


The global Public-Private Partnership for Handwashing with Soap (PPPHW) is a coalition of international stakeholders whose focus is handwashing and child health.

Established in 2001, the partnership aims to give families, schools, and communities in developing countries the power to prevent diarrhea and respiratory infections by supporting the universal promotion and practice of proper handwashing with soap at critical times.

Various global and national organizations are committed to promoting handwashing with soap on a large scale:

  • Governments that support national programs to promote handwashing.
  • Donor organizations that increasingly include handwashing in their water, sanitation, health, and education programs.
  • The private sector that brings state-of-the-art marketing know-how and techniques to the table, as well as support at the national level.
  • Academic and scientific organizations that contribute the latest behavior-change theory and scientific evidence of the effectiveness of handwashing.
  • Non-governmental and community-based organizations that aim to promote handwashing programs and integrate them into their work agenda.

 

Objectives

The PPPHW works explicitly to promote handwashing with soap and recognizes that hygiene, sanitation, and water are pillars of development.

The PPPHW works to make handwashing a common practice in homes, schools, and communities worldwide.

The PPPHW aims at achieving the following:

  • reduce the incidence of diarrheal diseases and respiratory infections in poor communities through promoting handwashing with soap;
  • implement large-scale handwashing interventions and use lessons to promote the approach at the global level;
  • share scientific evidence showing that handwashing with soap is an exceptionally cost-effective health intervention.

The PPPHW also seeks to promote awareness, build political commitment, and trigger action on this critical issue at local, national, and international levels.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

Handwashing initiatives are currently underway in the following countries across the globe, with programs focused on promoting the practice of handwashing with soap among children, mothers, teachers and caregivers altogether.

  1. Benin
  2. Colombia
  3. Ghana
  4. Indonesia
  5. Kenya
  6. Nepal
  7. Nicaragua
  8. Peru
  9. Philippines
  10. Senegal
  11. Tanzania
  12. Uganda
  13. Vietnam

For further info on the country projects go to: http://www.globalhandwashing.org/country-work/country-pages.php

 

 

 

Global Water Systems Project

http://www.gwsp.org/

 

The Earth System Science Partnership of DIVERSITAS, IGBP, IHDP and WCRP recently launched a set of four Joint Projects to address research questions regarding the global aspects of environmental change impacts on water, food, carbon and human health in an integrated way.

Multiple threats, summarized under the heading of global environmental change, and interactions cause perturbations to the global water system, a system that is not well observed, understood, and, due to its complexity, has yielded limited predictability.

The Global Water System Project builds on 25 years of scientific leadership, expertise and the information database of the four global environmental change programmes to create added value results for societal benefits.

While science driven, the Joint Project on the Global Water System will provide policy-informing results, specifically targeting issues pertaining to the global aspects of environmental change that are of high interest to water managers worldwide.

GWSP research supports global assessments of water, and the development of adaptation strategies with the appropriate scientific basis and international consensus as was done for greenhouse gases. GWSP coordinates and supports a bold research agenda to understand this complex system with its interactions between natural and human components and their feedbacks.

GWSP will provide strategies for policy-informing research on human dimensions underpinned by political discourse, global observing systems, model simulations, and by delivering tailored products for water managers on all continents.

 

Objectives

The Global Water System Project seeks to answer the fundamental and
multi-faceted question:

How are humans changing the global water cycle, the associated biogeochemical cycles, and the biological components of the global water system and what are the social feedbacks arising from these changes?

Three major research themes follow this overarching question

I. What are the magnitudes of anthropogenic and environmental changes in the global water system and what are the key mechanisms by which they are induced?

II. What are the main linkages and feedbacks within the earth system arising from changes in the global water system?

III. How resilient and adaptable is the global water system to change, and what are sustainable water management strategies?

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

The Global Water System Project is currently working on these projects:

·        Global Reservoir and Dam (GRanD) Database - Project Summary, July 2008

  • The Digital Water Atlas
  • GWSP- LOICZ Collaboration
  • World Water Balance

 

For further info on current and past projects go to: http://www.gwsp.org/activities.html

 

 

International Centre for Soil Fertility and Agricultural Development

http://www.ifdc.org/  

 

IFDC is a public international organization addressing critical issues such as international food security, the alleviation of global hunger and poverty, environmental protection and the promotion of economic development and self-sufficiency. IFDC focuses on increasing productivity across the agricultural value chain in developing countries. This is achieved by the creation and transfer of effective and environmentally sound crop nutrient technology and agribusiness expertise.

IFDC is governed by an international board of directors with representation from developed and developing nations. The non-profit Center is supported by bilateral and multilateral aid agencies, private foundations and national governments. The non-profit Center was established in 1974 in response to global food and energy crises. To date, IFDC has provided assistance in nearly 100 countries.

Over the last 35 years, IFDC has focused on increasing and sustaining food security and agricultural productivity in over 130 developing countries through the development and transfer of effective and environmentally sound crop nutrient technology and agribusiness expertise.

The organization’s collaborative partnerships combine cutting-edge research and development with on-site training and education. IFDC has contributed to the development of institutional capacity building in 150 countries through more than 700 formal training programs, primarily as part of IFDC’s long-term agricultural development projects. Field demonstrations and training have assisted hundreds of thousands of farmers in developing countries.

 

Objectives

To increase sustainable agricultural productivity through the development and transfer of effective and environmentally sound plant nutrient technology and agricultural marketing expertise.

Key IFDC Objectives are:

Through worldwide field projects, with the backing of research:

  • To increase the efficiency of nitrogen use by 50 percent, from the current average of 30 to 45 percent to 45 to 70 percent.
  • To increase the yields of staple crops by at least 50 percent.
  • To increase farm income by 30 to 50 percent.

Through focused research efforts:

  • To make directly applied phosphate rock as effective as the more expensive water-soluble fertilizers.

For more information go to: http://www.ifdc.org/About/Strategic_Plan_%281%29

 

Budget

FDC funding sources include bilateral and multilateral development agencies, private enterprises, foundations and an assortment of other organizations. Additional revenue is generated from long-term, donor-funded market development projects involving the transfer of policy and technology improvements to emerging economies.

Because of these valued donors, IFDC is able to implement projects and initiatives that focus on improving the livelihoods of smallholder farmers and other members of the agricultural value chain in developing nations around the world.

Through their generous support, these donors demonstrate their commitment to the eradication of poverty and hunger, and their dedication to the sustainable advancement of developing societies around the world.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

FDC projects focus on increasing food security and agricultural productivity in developing countries through the development and transfer of effective and environmentally sound crop nutrient technology and agribusiness expertise. The Center’s work ranges from sector studies and long-term planning to the design, implementation and management of field projects in fertilizer production; development, evaluation and use of indigenous agro-minerals; policy, market and value chain development; and natural resource management.

IFDC works closely with farmers, agri-input dealers and output traders, the private sector, local organizations and developing country institutions to achieve sustainable impacts that last long after projects end.

For more information on past and current projects go to: http://www.ifdc.org/Projects

 

 

Netherlands Water Partnership

http://www.nwp.nl/en/

The Netherlands Water Partnership (NWP) is a comprehensive  network that unites Dutch water expertise. The partnership, consisting of members from private companies, government, knowledge institutes and NGOs, acts as a centre of information on water expertise, policy developments and market opportunities. But NWP is more than an information source, the organisation also  initiates, coordinates and executes projects for its members, such as trade missions, exhibitions and conferences. 

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

Over 10 years already, the Netherlands Water Partnership has stimulated cooperation and synchronization of all parties that comprise the Dutch Water Sector. By offering an integral solution using nation branding, the Dutch increase their position on the world water market. NWP organises and coordinates projects and events in the Netherlands, on an EU level and in the rest of the world. 

On a national level, the NWP facilitates and stimulates:

  • Innovation Program Water Technology
  • Network Delta Technology
  • WASH
  • Human Capital Water
  • Dutch Delta Design 2012

On a European Level:

  • European Water Partnership (EWP)

On an international level NWP focuses on a select number of foreign markets, which offer considerable business/cooperation opportunities. This prioritisation is results from extensive research and is in line with the focus of the Partners for Water Program.

NWP communicates opportunities and developments, brings member organisations together, and organises and coordinates projects on these markets. These projects can be one-time trade exhibitions, seminars, or trade missions. On some markets however, a strong public private consortium is necessary with a long breath, to be permanently set foot on the ground. For these countries, the NWP coordinates so called Country Platforms: structural cooperation between  a selected number of dedicated public and private organisations focused on a single market.

For further information go to: http://www.nwp.nl/en/what_we_do/

 

 

Nile Basin Initiative

http://www.nilebasin.org/

 

The Nile Basin Initiative was created in order to achieve sustainable socio-economic development through the equitable utilization of, and benefit from, the common Nile Basin water resources.

 

Objectives

The key drives of the Nile Basin Initiative is to combate water shortage, poverty, environmental degradation, and climate change.

 

Budget

The Nile Basin Initiative is supported by contributions from the NBI countries themselves and through the generous support of several multilateral and bilateral donors. The financial mechanisms in support of the NBI are designed with several objectives in mind: to maximize riparian ownership and control of the process; to meet donor requirements for fiduciary accountability; and to provide timely and efficient administration of funds. Given the nascent nature of the cooperative Nile institutions, the magnitude of financial resources involved, the imperative for early implementation of projects, and following extensive consultation with potential donors, a Worldbank–managed, multi-donor trust fund was established as proposed by the Nile Council of Ministers as the preferred initial funding mechanism (although alternative funding mechanisms are also used). This was to allow funds to be transferred according to established disbursement and procurement procedures. The objective is the eventual transfer of the trust fund to a Nile Basin institution as program implementation progresses and a permanent institutional framework established.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

The Shared Vision project (SVP) is comprised of grant based activities to foster trust and cooperation and build an enabling environment for investment.

THE SVPs includes 8 projects:

Ongoing Projects

  1. Water Resources Management Project 
  2. Regional Power Trade Project

Completed Projects

  1. Applied Training Project
  2. Confidence-Building and Stakeholder Involvement Project
  3. Shared Vision Coordination Project
  4. Socio-economic and Benefits Sharing Project
  5. Transboundary Environmental Action Project
  6. Efficient Water Use for Agriculture Project

For more info on the individual projects, go to: http://www.nilebasin.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=blogcategory&id=14&Itemid=126

 

 

 

Stockholm Environment Institute

http://www.sei.se/index.php 

SEI is an independent international research institute. We have been engaged in environment and development issues at local, national, regional and global policy levels for more than 20 years.


Objectives

We believe that scientific insights can guide us through change and should inform decision making and public policy. We also believe that local knowledge and values are crucial in building sustainable lives. Our approach is often highly collaborative, and stakeholder involvement has always been at the heart of SEI’s work. Our projects help to build capacity and strengthen institutions to equip our partners for the long-term.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

Our researchers are gathered into four thematic teams that tackle overarching issues like climate change, energy systems, vulnerability and governance, as well as specific problems such as water resources and air pollution.

SEI, among its projects on management of environmental systems, focuses on modeling carbon and water cycles.

For more information on SEI’s see link: http://sei-international.org/projects

 

 

 

Sustainable Sanitation Alliance

http://www.susana.org/   http://www.susana.org/images/documents/02-vision/en-susana-statement-version-1-2-february-2008.pdf                                  

SuSanA is not a new organisation, but rather a loose network of organisations working along the same lines, and open to others who want to join and be active in the promotion of sustainable sanitation systems. The Sustainable Sanitation Alliance invites other international, regional and local organisations to join the network, contribute ideas, and to become active members in the thematic working groups. Feedback for the advancement of the joint road map is certainly appreciated, as it is work in progress that will be continuously updated, and will include all joint activities leading towards an increased implementation of sustainable sanitation systems

 

Objectives

The overall goal of the SuSanA is to contribute to the achievement of the MDGs by promoting sanitation systems which take into consideration all aspects of sustainability.

The MDGs and the UN's "International Year of Sanitation 2008" are highly appreciated by the "Sustainable Sanitation Alliance" as they help push sanitation high up in the political agenda. The main focus of the work of the "Sustainable Sanitation Alliance" will be to promote the implementation of sustainable sanitation systems in large scale water and sanitation programmes, in line with the strategies proposed e.g. by WHO, UNDP-PEP, UNSGAB and UNESCO.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

Within SuSanA several thematic working groups have been established in order to cover a variety of different sanitation aspects and to provide deliverables that underline the problems and opportunities of these aspects.

Working group 1 - capacity development

Working group 2 - costs and economics

This working group will enrich the weak data base on costs and economics - which play a key role in the selection and sustainability of sanitation systems - and develop a methodology for cost benefit analysis. >>read more

Working group 3 - renewable energies, climate change and groundwater protection

The objective of this working group is to raise general awareness for the energy potential of the sustainable sanitation approach and its prospective contribution to reduce dependence on imported or fossil energy sources. >>read more

Working group 4 - sanitation systems, technology options, hygiene and health

This working group will develop possible options on how to improve sanitation systems especially in developing countries. >>read more

Working group 5 - food security and productive sanitation systems

This working group aims to raise awareness for the reuse-oriented sustainable sanitation approach, its prospective contribution to global food security and to promote this approach on a large scale. >>read more

Working group 6 - sustainable sanitation for cities and planning

The overall aim of this working group will be to develop strategies on how cities can adopt an appropriate planning, implementation, and management process that leads towards more sustainable sanitation solutions. >>read more

Working group 7 - community, rural and school sanitation

This working group tries to raise general awareness for community and rural sanitation by creating discussion fora and enhancing networking opportunities. >>read more

Working group 8 - sustainable sanitation in emergency and reconstruction situations

The objective of this working group is to combine the knowledge from experts in the fields of sanitation with the knowledge from experts in the field of emergency response and reconstruction. >>read more

Working group 9 - sanitation as a business

The aims of this working group are to develop an open-source data base on best practises in integrated social marketing and to establish a formal network of experts in this field. >>read more

Working group 10 - public awareness and sanitation marketing

This working group aims to create global awareness of sustainable sanitation options, and on how to make them more accessible and affordable in the local and global market especially for the poor. >>read more

Working group 11 - operation and maintenance of sustainable sanitation

The main task of this working group is to discuss and disseminate relevant information related to best practice examples of operation and maintenance systems for sustainable sanitation by elaborating fact sheets, case studies, posters and other information materials. >>read more

Working group 12 - gender aspects of sustainable sanitation

This working group is going to develop a fact sheet addressing the specific needs of both men and women in sustainable sanitation so that both accept the sustainable sanitation solutions. >>read more 

For further reading see http://www.susana.org/lang-en/working-groups

 

 

Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency

http://www.sida.se/English/ 

 

Sida is a government agency of the country of Sweden with over 650 employees. Sida channels its resources through NGOs, multilateral cooperation, and the EU, among others and is interested in promoting the idea of “international development cooperation” to replace the one-sided giving indicated by the term “assistance.” Supporting over 2,000 projects in over 100 countries (over 20 of them are specially designated as target countries), Sida seeks to create partnerships with companies, popular movements, organizations, universities, and government agencies for its development projects. Sida’s geographic focus is on countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Central and Eastern Europe.

 

Objectives

Sida works according to directives of the Swedish Parliament and Government to reduce poverty in the world. The overall goal of Swedish development cooperation is to contribute to making it possible for poor people to improve their living conditions. Sida's organization has three main pillars:

  • Policy, which is responsible for global dialogues and reaching consensus, knowledge development and advice, quality assurance and competence;
  • Operations, which is responsible for the implementation of the development co-operation;
  • Management, which is responsible for control and planning functions as well as service to the rest of the authority.

 

Budget

Sweden's development aid is funded by the people of Sweden through the taxes they pay. The government decides how much money Sida receives.

The government’s letter of appropriation sets out how much money Sida can use and how the funds should be allocated among the organisation’s various activities. Sweden’s total development aid budget for 2010 is about SEK 31,4 billion.

About SEK 16 billion of this is administered by Sida. The letter of appropriation also sets out how Sida is to carry out its work, for example, the size of budget support that a particular country should receive.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

Sida’s task is to contribute to environmentally sustainable development. It is impossible to combat poverty without taking into account the natural resources and the environment that people are dependent on and on which they build their livelihood. The environment and sustainable development affect all sectors and an environmental and climate perspective should be part of all Sida’s efforts.

Important starting points for Sida’s work with environmentally sustainable development:

  • Food security – economic development and combating poverty are completely dependent on how a country deals with its environment.
  • Human health is dependent on the state of the environment and good ecosystem management. Climate changes increase the risk of spreading diseases, such as malaria.
  • Democratic systems are threatened when environmental degradation, climate change, the depletion of ecosystems and a lack of resources limit living space.
  • The depletion of ecosystems and climate changes increase both the risk of and vulnerability to natural disasters and the competition for resources. People could be forced to move within their own country or to other countries. In the long term, this could lead to an increase in the risk of armed conflicts.

Climate changes, such as the depletion of ecosystems, are already evident in many of Sweden’s partner countries and have had major consequences on people’s health and ability to support themselves. In other words, good management of the environment and natural resources is necessary to reduce poverty. Sweden is one of the countries that has worked hardest to put environmental issues on the global agenda.

Greater access to basic public services, such as energy, water, sanitation and housing, is vital in combating poverty and to economic development. This is also a foundation on which to base other human rights. Sweden and Sida have been pioneers in including issues concerning participation, sustainability and gender equality in these sectors to achieve environmentally sustainable development and tangible poverty reduction in vulnerable societies.

The starting point for Sida’s work with environmentally sustainable development is strengthening its partner countries’ own capacity and ability. Cooperation with other donors and international organizations is important, as is support to non-governmental organizations and collaboration with trade and industry and research. 

 


UNSG's Advisory Board on Water and Sanitation (UNSGAB)

http://www.unsgab.org/ 


Solving global water problems is central to eradicating poverty and achieving sustainable development. The UNSG's Advisory Board on Water and Sanitation (UNSGAB) is an independent body established in March 2004 by United Nations Secretary-General, Mr. Kofi Annan, to give him advice as well as to galvanize action on water and sanitation issues.

Chaired by His Royal Highness the Prince of the Netherlands, the Board is composed of a wide range of dignitaries, technical experts, and individuals with proven experience in providing inspiration, moving the machinery of government, as well as working with the media, the private sector and civil society.

UNSGAB Secretariat is hosted by the Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA), United Nations.

 

Objectives

The UNSG Advisory Board is an independent body to:

  • give advice to UN Secretary General;
  • give input in global dialogue process;
  • raise global awareness through mass-media, etc.;
  • influence and work on global, regional, national institutions at highest level; and
  • take its own actions towards MDGs

The Board, inter alia, focus their work on:

  • help to mobilize resources for water and sanitation towards achievement of MDGs and JPOI;
  • publicly mobilize support and advocate for actions and ensure political visibility;
  • assess progress made towards the water and sanitation goals; and
  • advocate for improving the capacity of Governments and the international system

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

UNSGAB recognizes that the MDG targets on water and sanitation will go unmet unless institutions and players at the regional, national, and local levels adopt new approaches. Our members are meeting in every region for dialogues to identify pressing needs, to plot out critical actions, and to commit to actions that UNSGAB, regional banks, and other stakeholders can take to increase sanitation coverage and improve water delivery. Each of these Regional Dialogues results in a joint statement of intended actions with follow-up mechanisms in place to ensure implementation.

To identify what donors can do to maximize their efforts in water and sanitation, Dialogues are also held with key international institutions such as the OECD, the EU, and the World Bank.

 

 

 

USAID Environmental Health

http://www.ehproject.org/

 

USAID's Environmental Health Team sponors projects and provides financial support to selected governmental and international organizations to conduct programs and research on environmental health issues. These include:

  • Hygiene Improvement Project (HIP)
  • CDC/ Safewater
  • POUZN
  • PPP Handwashing
  • WHO HWTS Network

For more info on each project see: http://www.ehproject.org/eh/projects.html

 

 

 

Water Net

http://www.waternetonline.ihe.nl/

WaterNet is a regional network of university departments and research and training institutes specialising in water. The network aims to build regional institutional and human capacity in Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) through training, education, research and outreach by harnessing the complementary strengths of member institutions in the region and elsewhere. WaterNet member institutions have expertise in various aspects of water resources management and are based in Southern and East Africa. 

The vision of WaterNet is a future in which the Southern African Development Community (SADC) has the institutional and human capacity to educate and train its own water managers, capable to contribute to the equitable sharing and sustainable utilisation of water resources for poverty alleviation, economic development (livelihood security) and environmental security.

 

The mission of WaterNet is to build the regional institutional and human capacity in Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) through training, education, research and outreach by harnessing the complementary strengths of member institutions in the region and elsewhere.

 

 

 

 

 

African Development Bank Group

http://www.afdb.org/en

 

The African Development Bank (AfDB) Group’s mission is to help reduce poverty, improve living conditions for Africans and mobilize resources for the continent’s economic and social development. With this objective in mind, the institution aims at assisting African countries – individually and collectively - in their efforts to achieve sustainable economic development and social progress. Combating poverty is at the heart of the continent’s efforts to attain sustainable economic growth. To this end, the Bank seeks to stimulate and mobilize internal and external resources to promote investments as well as provide its regional member countries with technical and financial assistance.

The institution’s greatest assets are its human resources which come from a wide geographic area. The Bank is an equal opportunity employer and firmly believes that recruitment from a wide geographical and cultural spectrum enriches the institution with varied talents, experiences and skills that will enhance the quality of human resources management and ultimately the realization of the Bank’s mission of reducing poverty across the continent.

In accordance with its policy of decentralization aimed at taking its operations closer to its beneficiaries, the Bank has, over the past few years, established about 23 field and country offices across the continent.

 

Objectives

The overarching objective of the African Development Bank (AfDB) Group is to spur sustainable economic development and social progress in its regional member countries (RMCs), thus contributing to poverty reduction.

The Bank Group achieves this objective by:

  • Mobilizing and allocating resources for investment in RMCs; and
  • Providing policy advice and technical assistance to support development efforts.

 

Budget

  • Authorized Capital at December 31, 2008 Unit of Accounts (UA) 21.87 billion
  • Subscribed Capital at December 31, 2008 UA 21.77 billion
  • Paid-up Capital at December 31, 2008 UA 2.36 billion
  • Total Cumulative Approvals, 1967–2008 3,276 loans and grants totaling UA 44.75 billion

 

The ADF, the concessional window of the African Development Bank (AfDB) Group, successfully concluded in December 2007 its 11th Resource Replenishment (ADF-11) for the Fund’s activity in 2008-2010. For such period, ADF Deputies agreed on a record level of UA5.9 billion. The Fund’s core strategic priorities for ADF-11 are infrastructure, governance, fragile states and regional integration.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

The Bank Group has, since 1968, sought to finance non-project operations, including structural adjustment loans, policy-based reforms and various forms of technical assistance and policy advice. The AfDB Group has also widened the scope of its activities to cover new initiatives such as the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD), water and sanitation as well as HIV/AIDS.

The overriding objective of the AfDB is to improve living conditions on the continent through various initiatives.

For example, Africa has the lowest water resources development level, with only 4% of its annual resources invested in water. Nearly 40% of the cultivated areas are irrigated and the energy potential is virtually untapped. The management and development of water resources are among the most crucial issues facing Africa.

To take up these enormous challenges on the continent, the AfDB has led many water-related activities. The most important include the AfDB Rural Water Supply and Sanitation (RWSSI) which will grant access to an extra 33 million people to safe drinking water and sanitation by 2010. The Bank also participates in other major initiatives such as the African Water Facility (AWF) and the NEPAD’s Water and Sanitation Programme.

 

 


FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations)

http://www.fao.org

 

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations leads international efforts to defeat hunger. Serving both developed and developing countries, FAO acts as a neutral forum where all nations meet as equals to negotiate agreements and debate policy. FAO is also a source of knowledge and information. We help developing countries and countries in transition modernize and improve agriculture, forestry and fisheries practices and ensure good nutrition for all. Since our founding in 1945, we have focused special attention on developing rural areas, home to 70 percent of the world's poor and hungry people.

 

Objectives

Achieving food security for all is at the heart of FAO's efforts - to make sure people have regular access to enough high-quality food to lead active, healthy lives.

FAO's mandate is to raise levels of nutrition, improve agricultural productivity, better the lives of rural populations and contribute to the growth of the world economy.

FAO provides the kind of behind-the-scenes assistance that helps people and nations help themselves. If a community wants to increase crop yields but lacks the technical skills, we introduce simple, sustainable tools and techniques. When a country shifts from state to private land ownership, we provide the legal advice to smooth the way. When a drought pushes already vulnerable groups to the point of famine, we mobilize action. And in a complex world of competing needs, we provide a neutral meeting place and the background knowledge needed to reach consensus.

 

Budget

FAO’s Regular Programme budget is funded by its members, through contributions set at the FAO Conference. The FAO budget for the biennium 2008-2009 is US$929.8 million, adjusted to the Euro/US dollar exchange rate fixed by the FAO Conference. The budget covers core technical work, cooperation and partnerships including the Technical Cooperation Programme, information and general policy, direction and administration.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

FAO Natural Resources Management and Environment department focuses in ensuring adequate food and water to all and achieving sustainable rural development and livelihoods for current and future generations all hinge upon the responsible management of natural resources.

 

 

 

FAO Water

http://www.fao.org/nr/water/what.html

In the face of increasing water scarcity, and the dominance of agricultural water use, FAO is in the forefront to enhance global agricultural performance while promoting the sustainability of water use for food production.

The Water Development and Management Unit (NRLW) is engaged in a programmatic approach to agricultural water management addressing water use efficiency and productivity, and best practices for water use and conservation, throughout the continuum from water sources to final uses.

Specific targets are integrated water resources management, water harvesting, groundwater, use of non-conventional water, modernization of irrigation systems, on-farm water management, water-quality management, agriculture-wetlands interactions, drought impact mitigation, institutional capacities, national water strategies and policies, river basin and transboundary waters management.

NRLW collaborates with all other technical departments of FAO in order to generate a coherent and comprehensive FAO-Water programme effectively contributing to the achievement of the related Millennium Development Goals.

With its continually updated water information system AQUASTAT, and tools for analysis such as CROPWAT, AQUACROP and MASSCOTE, NRLW is able to contribute in the formulation of national and regional water management strategies and perspective studies.

 

 

 

Global Water Partnership (GWP)

http://www.gwpforum.org/servlet/PSP

 

The Global Water Partnership's vision is for a water secure world. Its mission is to support the sustainable development and management of water resources at all levels.

GWP was founded in 1996 by the World Bank, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), and the Swedish International Development Agency (SIDA) to foster integrated water resource management (IWRM), and to ensure the coordinated development and management of water, land, and related resources by maximising economic and social welfare without compromising the sustainability of vital environmental systems. During the past 12 years, the GWP Network has become active in 13 regions and over 70 countries.

The network is open to all organisations involved in water resources management: developed and developing country government institutions, agencies of the United Nations, bi- and multi-lateral development banks, professional associations, research institutions, non-governmental organisations, and the private sector.

 

 

 

International Monetary Fund (IMF)

http://www.imf.org/external/index.htm

 

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is an organization of 186 countries, working to foster global monetary cooperation, secure financial stability, facilitate international trade, promote high employment and sustainable economic growth, and reduce poverty around the world.

 

Objective

Through its economic surveillance, the IMF keeps track of the economic health of its member countries, alerting them to risks on the horizon and providing policy advice. It also lends to countries in difficulty, and provides technical assistance and training to help countries improve economic management. This work is backed by IMF research and statistics

The IMF collaborates with the World Bank, the regional development banks, the World Trade Organization (WTO), UN agencies, and other international bodies. While all of these organizations are involved in global economic issues, each has its own unique areas of responsibility and specialization. The IMF also interacts with think tanks, civil society, and the media on a daily basis.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

The IMF and the World Bank are different, but complement each other's work. Whereas the IMF's focus is chiefly on macroeconomic and financial sector issues, the World Bank is concerned mainly with longer-term development and poverty reduction. Its loans finance infrastructure projects, the reform of particular sectors of the economy, and broader structural reforms. Countries must join the IMF to be eligible for World Bank membership.

 

 


UN Habitat  

http://www.unhabitat.org

 

The United Nations Human Settlements Programme, UN-HABITAT, is the United Nations agency for human settlements. It is mandated by the UN General Assembly to promote socially and environmentally sustainable towns and cities with the goal of providing adequate shelter for all.

 

Objective

UN-HABITAT's programmes are designed to help policy-makers and local communities get to grips with the human settlements and urban issues and find workable, lasting solutions. UN-HABITAT's work is directly related to the United Nations Millennium Declaration, particularly the goals of member States to improve the lives of at least 100 million slum dwellers by the year 2020, Target 11, Millennium Development Goal No. 7, and Target 10 which calls for the reduction by half of the number without sustainable access to safe drinking water.

 

Budget

The Fund was started with one million US dollars advanced from the Housing and Human Settlements Foundation. UN-HABITAT signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the Government of Canada committing US$11.3million to the Trust Fund. The donor community has responded impressively with generous contributions. Other countries donating funds have included the Governments of Sweden US$3.3million, the Government of Norway US$10million, The Netherlands, US$22.9 million, with US$14.9million going towards the Lake Victoria Water and Sanitation Initiative.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

The highest priority for UN-HABITAT's Water and Sanitation programme is improving access to safe water and helping provide adequate sanitation to millions of low-income urban dwellers and measuring that impact.

UN-HABITAT's Water and Sanitation programme is funded by a Water and Sanitation Trust Fund. Its main focus is improving delivery of water and sanitation in African Asia through its regional programmes, Water for African Cities and Water for Asian Cities, and promoting policy dialogue, information exchange, water education and awareness raising. It also monitors progress towards achieving the Millennium Development Goal targets on improving access to safe water and sanitation and undertakes replicable model-setting initiatives, notably the Lake Victoria Region Water and Sanitation and Mekong Regional Water and Sanitation initiatives.

 

 

 

United Nations Commission for Sustainable Development (UNCSD)

http://www.un.org/esa/dsd/index.shtml

 

The Division for Sustainable Development (DSD) provides leadership and is an authoritative source of expertise within the United Nations system on sustainable development. It promotes sustainable development as the substantive secretariat to the UN Commission on Sustainable Development (CSD) and through technical cooperation and capacity building at international, regional and national levels. The context for the Division's work is the implementation of Agenda 21, the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation and the Barbados Programme of Action for Sustainable Development of Small Island Developing States.

Objective

  • Integration of the social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainable development in policy-making at international, regional and national levels;
  • Wide-spread adoption of an integrated, cross-sectoral and broadly participatory approach to sustainable development;
  • Measurable progress in the implementation of the goals and targets of the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation.

CSD's role has been to ensure effective follow-up of UNCED; to monitor and report on implementation of the Earth Summit agreements at the local, national, regional and international levels. The CSD is a functional commission of the UN Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), with 53 members. A five-year review of Earth Summit progress took place in 1997 by the United Nations General Assembly meeting in special session. In 2002, a ten-year review was held at the World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD) in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Promotion in the Water Sector

The Commission on Sustainable Development, at its twelfth session (2004) reviewed and assessed implementation of three thematic issues, including water and sanitation. Most recently, in 2005, at its thirteenth session, the Commission explored policy options for furthering implementation on the issues of water and sanitation as well as on human settlements as reflected in its decision.

 

United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs

http://www.un.org/esa/coordination/ngo

 

 

The Department of Economic and Social Affairs promotes and supports international cooperation to achieve development for all, and assists governments in agenda-setting and decision-making on development issues at the global level. DESA provides a broad range of analytical products and policy advice that serve as valuable sources of reference and decision-making tools for developed and developing countries, particularly in translating global commitments into national policies and action and in monitoring progress towards the internationally agreed development goals, including the Millennium Development Goals.

 

It implements strategies through normative, analytical, statistical and technical cooperation activities. These responsibilities include:

  • Contributing to and facilitation of the international dialogue and debate on development cooperation,
  • Supporting the coordination function of central intergovernmental bodies and assisting the Secretary-General in enhancing policy coherence and coordination, and
  • Supplement research and training to support the efforts of governments and local entities in formulating development strategies and building national capacities.

 

The DESA represents the interface between global policies and national action, and between research and operational activities, thereby facilitating the translation of international agreements to strategies at the country level, and channelling lessons learned and experiences gained from the country level into the international policy development process. In implementing the programme, the Department also aims at strengthening linkages between the UN and civil society and at developing innovative means of cooperation and modes of partnership in areas of common interest.

 

 

 

United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

 

http://www.undp.org

 

UNDP is the UN's global development network, an organization advocating for change and connecting countries to knowledge, experience and resources to help people build a better life. We are on the ground in 166 countries, working with them on their own solutions to global and national development challenges. As they develop local capacity, they draw on the people of UNDP and our wide range of partners.

 

As part of its mandate, UNDP has a key co-ordinating role in the United Nations Development Group (UNDG).

UNDP is helping to reinforce joint action on development in such forums as the Economic and Social Council and the General Assembly of the United Nations. Over the past years it has played an important role in fostering coordination in summits such as Financing for Development 2002 and the World Summit on Sustainable Development 2002.

 

UNDP has seven priority practice areas:

  • Democratic Governance
  • Poverty Reduction
  • Crisis Prevention and Recovery
  • Energy and Environment
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Women’s Empowerment
  • Capacity Development

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

 

Working towars the MDGs:

UNDP is working with a wide range of partners to help create coalitions for change to support the goals at global, regional and national levels, to benchmark progress towards them, and to help countries to build the institutional capacity, policies and programmes needed to achieve the MDGs.

Guided by the UN Core Strategy, UNDP's work on the MDGs focuses on coordinating global and local efforts that:

  • Campaign and mobilise for the MDGs through advocacy;
  • Share the best strategies for meeting the MDGs in terms of innovative practices, policy and institutional reforms, means of policy implementation, and evaluation of financing options;
  • Monitor and report progress towards the MDGs; and
  • Support governments in tailoring the MDGs to local circumstances and challenges.

 

 

 

United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP)

 

http://www.unep.org

 

UNEP, established in 1972, is the voice for the environment within the United Nations system. UNEP acts as a catalyst, advocate, educator and facilitator to promote the wise use and sustainable development of the global environment. To accomplish this, UNEP works with a wide range of partners, including United Nations entities, international organizations, national governments, non-governmental organizations, the private sector and civil society

 

Mission

 

 To provide leadership and encourage partnership in caring for the environment by inspiring, informing, and enabling nations and peoples to improve their quality of life without compromising that of future generations

 

 

UNEP work encompasses:

· Assessing global, regional and national environmental conditions and trends

· Developing international and national environmental instruments

· Strengthening institutions for the wise management of the environment

· Facilitating the transfer of knowledge and technology for sustainable development

· Encouraging new partnerships and mind-sets within civil society and the private sector

 

UNEP is primarily funded through the UN with some additional funding through its Environment Fund (voluntary), Trust Funds (extra-budgetary resources that are separate accounts for complementary or supplementary programmes) and Counter-part Contributions.

 

 

 

Water and Sanitation Programme (WSP)

 

http://www.wsp.org

 

Objective

 

The Water and Sanitation Program (WSP) is a multi-donor partnership administered by the World Bank to support poor people in obtaining affordable, safe and sustainable access to water and sanitation services. We work directly with client governments at the local and national level in 25 countries through regional offices in Africa, East and South Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, and in, Washington D.C.

 

WSP focuses on five topics that are represented in each of our regions.

Financing the Sector
Rural Water Supply and Sanitation
Strategic Communications
Sanitation and Hygiene
Urban Water Supply and Sanitation

 

 

Budget

 

WSP is an independent, donor-funded program administered within the Department of Energy, Water and Transport in the Sustainable Development Network Vice Presidency of The World Bank.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

 

WSP has led or supported many of the advances made within the water and sanitation sector over the last three decades.  We are able to share best practices across regions and place a strong focus on capacity-building by forming partnerships with academia, civil society organizations, donors, governments, media, private sector, and others.  Our work helps to effect the regulatory and structural changes needed for broad water and sanitation sector reform.

 

Our challenge is to replicate successful approaches, continue targeted learning efforts, and support reforms that ensure the adoption of sustainable investments in the sector that help people rise from poverty

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC)

 

http://www.wsscc.org

 

The Collaborative Council exists under a mandate from the United Nations. It is governed by a multi-stakeholder steering committee elected by the Collaborative Council's members, combining the authority of the UN with the flexibility of an NGO and the legitimacy of a membership organisation.

WSSCC focuses exclusively on those people around the world who currently lack water and sanitation, with all its policies and work aimed only to serve those people. The Collaborative Council has a special interest in sanitation and hygiene and emphasises the need to view water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) as an inseparable trinity for development.

 

Objective

 

WSSCC's mission is to achieve sustainable water supply and sanitation for ALL people by following six core principles:

  • WSSCC only exists to serve poor people
  • The people themselves are at the centre of planning and action for achieving sustainable water and sanitation
  • WSSCC works by enhancing collaboration among sector agencies and professionals rather than implementing its own projects
  • Water and sanitation are essential for social and economic development
  • WSSCC aims to be at the forefront of global knowledge, debate and influence in its field
  • The number of people without sanitation is much greater than the number without water, while the agencies working in sanitation are fewer; therefore WSSCC dedicates most of its effort to sanitation and hygiene.

 

In 2000, the Collaborative Council presented "Vision 21", a process and a document that set out an ambitious plan to achieve global water supply and sanitation coverage by 2025. Vision 21 emphasizes the importance of people centred approaches to achieve sustainable water supply and adequate sanitation services.

 

Using the MDGs' targets as milestones, the Collaborative Council aims to improve access to water, sanitation and hygiene for all people. The Collaborative Council promotes achievement of the water supply and sanitation targets as an integral component of other MDGs - including the eradication of extreme poverty, the improvement of global health, and the attainment of gender equality and long-term social and economic development

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

The Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council (WSSCC) has a track record of almost two decades in networking and advocacy, and a secure institutional host in WHO. It is firmly established as one of the major global organizations concerned with water and sanitation for poor communities.

 



International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN)

 

http://www.iucn.org

 

UCN, the International Union for Conservation of Nature, helps the world find pragmatic solutions to our most pressing environment and development challenges. It supports scientific research, manages field projects all over the world and brings governments, non-government organizations, United Nations agencies, companies and local communities together to develop and implement policy, laws and best practice.

 

IUCN is the world’s oldest and largest global environmental network - a democratic membership union with more than 1,000 government and NGO member organizations, and almost 11,000 volunteer scientists in more than 160 countries. It is funded by governments, bilateral and multilateral agencies, foundations, member organizations and corporations

 

Objective

 

Our mission is to influence, encourage and assist societies throughout the world to conserve the integrity and diversity of nature and to ensure that any use of natural resources is equitable and ecologically sustainable.

 

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

 

All of IUCN’s work on biodiversity, climate change, energy, livelihoods and economics falls under a broad framework programme, discussed and approved by member organizations every four years at IUCN’s World Conservation Congress. The current programme runs from 2009-2012.

Within this broad programme, individual departments and initiatives in more than 60 offices, more than 1,000 member organizations, and more than 11,000 individual expert members, lead and manage the work in more than 160 countries around the world

People depend on natural resources for food, fuel and drinking water. The management, conservation, and restoration of ecosystems, known as ecosystem-based adaptation, can ensure that ecosystems continue to provide the services that enable people to adapt to climate change impacts.

 

World Health Organisation (WHO)

http://www.who.int/en

WHO is the directing and coordinating authority for health within the United Nations system. It is responsible for providing leadership on global health matters, shaping the health research agenda, setting norms and standards, articulating evidence-based policy options, providing technical support to countries and monitoring and assessing health trends.

Objective

Since its creation in 1948, the World Health Organisation has contributed to major accomplishments resulting in a healthier world. The objective of WHO is to let all peoples attain the highest possible level of health. Health, as defined in the WHO Constitution, is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.

Their six core principles are:

1.      Promoting development

2.      Fostering health security

3.      Strengthening health systems

4.      Harnessing research, information and evidence

5.      Enhancing partnerships

6.      Improving performance

Promotion in the Water Sector

It is reported that in each year, an estimated 3-5 billion episodes of diarrhoea result in an estimated 3 million deaths, mostly among children. Waterborne bacterial infections may account for as many as half of these episodes and deaths. Confronted with the challenge, WHO has addressed serious problems related to water, such as drinking water quality, arsenic in drinking water, environmental sanitation and hygiene promotion, heath in water resources development etc.

WHO recognises that most of water born diseases are prevalent in the poorest countries, which contribute to a vicious cycle of poverty-disease-poverty and the continued marginalisation of people living in disease-prone areas.

 

 

World Water Council (WWC)

http://www.worldwatercouncil.org

The World Water Council is an international multi-stakeholder platform. It was established in 1996 on the initiative of renowned water specialists and international organizations, in response to an increasing concern about world water issues from the global community.

Objective

To promote awareness, build political commitment and trigger action on critical water issues at all levels, including the highest decision-making level, to facilitate the efficient conservation, protection, development, planning, management and use of water in all its dimensions on an environmentally sustainable basis for the benefit of all life on earth.

Budget

The Council is financed primarily through membership fees and additional support is provided by the host City of Marseilles. Specific projects and programs are financed through donations and grants from governments, international organizations and NGO's.

Promotion in the Water Sector

 

Among the wide range of activities carried out in order to achieve their objectives, the main Council event is the World Water Forum, which takes place once every three years. The Council also supports various dialogues, including cross-cutting ones, monitoring programs, workshops, publications, etc. All the Council's activities are conducted through committees, working groups and task forces, under the responsibility of the Board of Governors.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UNESCO – Natural Science 

 

http://www.unesco.org/water

 

The UNESCO Water Portal’s objective is to improve access to information on freshwater on the web.

The site serves as a thematic entry point to the current UNESCO and UNESCO-led programmes on freshwater. It also provides a platform for sharing and browsing websites of other water-related organizations, government bodies and NGOs through the water links and events databases

 

Available in English, French and Spanish, the UNESCO Water Portal newsletter brings you the latest news, events, facts and figures, publications and links about a different water related theme every two weeks.

 

 

 

International Water and Sanitation Centre (IRC)

http://www.irc.nl/page/104

 

Since its foundation in 1968, the IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre (IRC) has facilitated the sharing, promotion and use of knowledge so that governments, professionals and organisations can better support poor men, women and children in developing countries to obtain water and sanitation services they will use and maintain

 

 

Care

 

http://www.care-international.org/   

 

 

CARE is a leading humanitarian organization fighting global poverty. Non-political and non-sectarian, we operate each year in more than 65 countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Middle East and Eastern Europe, reaching more than 50 million people in poor communities.

CARE helps tackle underlying causes of poverty so that people can become self-sufficient. CARE is often one of the first to deliver emergency aid to survivors of natural disasters and war and, once the immediate crisis is over, we help people rebuild their lives. While CARE is a large international organisation with more than 14,500 employees worldwide, we have a strong local presence: more than 90 % of our staff are nationals of the countries where our programmes are run.

 

Objectives

 

All of CARE International’s member organizations share a common vision to fight against worldwide poverty and to protect and enhance human dignity. n this context, emergency relief is an important part of CARE’s mandate since natural and manmade disasters can drive otherwise self-sustaining populations into poverty and can often eradicate years of development work. CARE pays particular attention to the marginalized members of society and those least able to defend themselves, especially women and children.

 

CARE’s mission is to serve individuals and families in the poorest communities in the world. Drawing strength from our global diversity, resources and experience, we promote innovative solutions and are advocates for global responsibility. We promote lasting change by:

  1. Strengthening capacity for self-help
  2. Providing economic opportunity
  3. Delivering relief in emergencies
  4. Influencing policy decisions at all levels
  5. Addressing discrimination in all its forms

Budget

CARE’s work is made possible with the support of our donors, which include United Nations agencies, the European Commission, as well as national governments.

CARE International Members are also supported through the generosity of many individuals, corporations, trusts, foundations and community groups. We believe that all of our donors are essential partners in a growing global movement dedicated to the end of poverty.

Multilateral partners

  • European Union (EU) through the European Commission Humanitarian Office (ECHO)
    and Directorates General for Development (DG DEV), External Affairs (DG Relex), and Enlargement.
  • Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)
  • International Labour Organisation (ILO)
  • International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD)
  • United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
  • United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM)
  • United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
  • United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA)
  • United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT)
  • United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
  • Steering Committee for Humanitarian Response (SCHR)
  • The World Bank (WB)
  • World Health Organization (WHO)
  • World Food Programme (WFP)

Bilateral partners

  • Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID)
  • Austrian Federal Chancellery
  • Austrian Federal Ministry of Foreign Affairs
  • UK Government's Department for International Development (DFID)
  • Caisse Française de Développement
  • Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA)
  • Danish Cooperation for Environment and Development (DANCED)
  • Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA)
  • Dutch Ministry of Development Cooperation
  • French Ministry of Cooperation
  • German Ministry of Economical Cooperation and Development
  • Japanese Government
  • Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation (NORAD)
  • Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs
  • United States Agency for International Development (USAID)
  • United States Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA)

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

 

CARE helps communities to build and maintain clean water systems and latrines. Both directly and through local organizations, CARE provides training and subsidizes construction, but communities make significant contributions both in cash and labour, and pay the cost of operation and maintenance. The goal of these projects is to reduce the health risks of water-related diseases and to increase the earning potential of households by saving time otherwise spent fetching water. Projects also include educating people about good hygiene practice, which reduces the risk of illnesses.

 

 

 

Charity: Water

 

http://www.charitywater.org/

 

Charity: water is a non-profit organization bringing clean and safe drinking water to people in developing nations. 100% of public donations directly fund water projects.

 

Objectives

 

We’re not offering grand solutions and billion dollar schemes, but instead, simple things that work. Things like freshwater wells, rainwater catchments and sand filters. For about $20 a person, we know how to help millions.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

 

In four years, charity: water has raised more than $20 million and funded 2,906 water projects. View them here by country, local partner and project type:

http://www.charitywater.org/projects/ 

 

 

Asian Development Bank (ADB)

 

http://www.freshwateraction.net/web/w/www_59_en.aspx  http://www.adb.org/

 

ADB is a multilateral development finance institution dedicated to reducing poverty in Asia and the Pacific. Established in 1966, it is owned by 59 members, mostly from the region.

 

Objectives

It proposes Strategic Development Objectives by adopting Poverty Reduction, carrying out activities to promote economic growth, develop human resources, improve the status of women, and protect the environment. Its other key development objectives, such as law and policy reform, regional cooperation, private-sector development, and social development, also contribute significantly to this main goal.

Budget

Operations in ADB are financed by issuing bonds, recycling repayments and receiving contributions from member countries. The total assets of ADB in 2000 were around $43.8 billion.

Promotion in the Water Sector

ADB has been actively involved in the water sector and financed projects for irrigation, drainage, flood control, water supply and sanitation, hydropower, fisheries, forestry and watershed management, navigation, or multiple uses. Since its establishment in 1966, over $15 billion, or about 19 percent of its total lending, has been invested in water sector projects. Of this, hydropower ($2.8 billion), irrigation and drainage ($5 billion), water supply and sanitation ($4 billion), watershed management ($636 million), and flood control ($523 million) have been the principal areas of attention. Technical assistance worth $280 million has been provided to prepare projects, research sector issues, formulate sector solutions, and build institutional capacities. ADB's assistance has been provided mainly in the context of evolving country and sector strategies.

ADB attempts to move from an era of disaggregated water sector investments aimed primarily at creating assets to an era of holistic, integrated investments to promote efficient water use. The objectives of ADB are:

  • To support the development of an effective legislative framework and to provide a mechanism for dispute resolution.
  • To promote efficiencies in water use by supporting demand management, including water pricing.
  • To target the poor's equitable access to water, the empowerment of communities in the process of water management.

It attempts to include different stakeholders from different sectors, such as NGOs, representatives of user groups, the private sector, academia and government agencies in water management and development. The ADB seems to emphasise its role as financial supporter to facilitate multi-stake holder participation in water related development projects with the strategy of poverty reduction. However, the ADB's energetic drive towards multi stakeholder participation seems to be offset and in question by the fact that a large percentage of the poor people in Asia still face major difficulties in getting access to safe water.

 

More info on ways that civil organizations can work with ADB:   http://www.adb.org/NGOs/ngo-work.asp

 

 

 

Circle of Blue

 

http://www.siwi.org/partnerships

 

Circle of Blue is the international network of leading journalists, scientists and communications design experts that reports and presents the information necessary to respond to the global freshwater crisis. It is a nonprofit affiliate of the internationally recognized water, climate and policy think tank, the Pacific Institute.

Circle of Blue publishes WaterNews, the daily go-to source for global water news and data. It is also the co-founder of the global initiative, Designing Water’s Future, which emerged from a World Economic Forum session led by Circle of Blue and Collins: Transformative Design.

 

 Objectives

 

Circle of Blue makes the complexities of the global freshwater crisis relevant and personal. Circle of Blue reports and collects information and data, and presents it in coherent, accessible and connected forms. Circle of Blue provides a highly visible forum for response, and through communications design, extends awareness into action. In most cases, the solutions to solve the global freshwater crisis exist. What’s lacking is the awareness and will to respond.

Circle of Blue approaches the freshwater crisis with three coordinated, interrelated components: front-line journalism, existing and new science and data, and innovative communications design. Circle of Blue’s reporting captures the heart through exceptional fact-based storytelling, making water issues personal and relevant while providing a hub for data visualization, aggregation, and integration. Circle of Blue applies the best tools of the 21st century to help provide the knowledge that people need to make informed decisions.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

 

WaterNews is the daily extension of Circle of Blue’s long-form journalistic and scientific coverage of the global freshwater crisis. WaterNews encompasses a wide range of multimedia information — from the complex to the quirky — frontline reporting that’s engaging, valuable, timely and relevant. Circle of Blue strives to identify and describe the dimensions of the global freshwater crisis in ways not imagined only a few years ago.

 

 

Clearwater Initiative

 

http://www.clearwaterinitiative.org/

 

ClearWater Initiative is a non-governmental charitable organization that strives to provide clean, potable water solutions to populations in need.

 

Objectives

 

It is our mission to provide clean water to populations affected by natural or man-made humanitarian emergencies. We respond by promoting and funding both established and innovative clean water solutions. Our projects are implemented in partnerships with local Ugandan engineers. Projects are audited to ensure accountability.

 

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

Thanks to your generous support, ClearWater has provided clean, sustainable drinking water to more than 6,500 people since 2007! Examples of projects include:

 

European Water Partnership

http://www.ewp.eu/

The European Water Partnership (EWP) is an independent value based non-profit organization structured as an open and inclusive member association.

The EWP harnesses European capacity, helps to coordinate initiatives and activities in international water issues and undertakes worldwide promotion of European expertise related to water.

The ultimate goal of the EWP is to elaborate strategies and implement concrete actions to achieve the objectives of the Water Vision for Europe.

Objectives

  • Provide an open and independent forum to discuss innovative management, technological and financial solutions,
  • Mobilise funding methods for water and develop new procurement approaches,
  • Stimulate and support cooperation between members,
  • Put water on the mainstream political and media agenda, improving awareness of the urgency of water challenges among policy makers and business,
  • Promote the achievement of the Millenium Development Goals in the wider Europe and through an EU neighbourhood policy for water and the Horizon 2020 programme for the Mediterranean,
  • Contribute Independently to the EU water-related initiatives,
  • Promote technological and managerial innovation, developing projects to demonstrate innovative techologies and solutions, enabling these technologies to reach the market.

Promotion in the Water Sector

The activities of the European Water Partnership focus on initiating, supporting and enhancing initiatives and projects, contributing to reaching the Water Vision for Europe.

For 2009, the EWP’s activities are grouped in five main projects:

Aquawareness

“Changing behaviour, habits and practices towards sustainable water management in Europe”

Climate Change Adaptation and Water

“Sets up a stronger coordination and cooperation on Climate Change Adaptation and Water”

European Water House

“The place that will give your Water Vision the chance to be a reality!”

European Regional Process and follow up

“Prepared the European contribution to the fifth World Water Forum, Istanbul 2009″

INNOWATER

 “Facilitates the market uptake of new technologies addressing water challenges”

 

Food and Water Watch

 

http://www.foodandwaterwatch.org/water/

 

Food & Water Watch is a non-profit organization that advocates for common sense policies that will result in healthy, safe food and access to safe and affordable drinking water. Everyone is dependent on shared resources like clean water, safe food and healthy oceans. It’s essential that these shared resources be regulated in the public interest rather than for private gain.

Objectives

Food & Water Watch works to ensure the food, water and fish we consume is safe, accessible and sustainably produced. So we can all enjoy and trust in what we eat and drink, we help people take charge of where their food comes from, keep clean, affordable, public tap water flowing freely to our homes, protect the environmental quality of oceans, force government to do its job protecting citizens, and educate about the importance of keeping shared resources under public control.

Promotion in the Water Sector

  • Renew America’s Water
  • Private Vs. Public
  • Bottled Water
  • Water Conservation
  • Desalination
  • Chemical contaminants
  • Groundwater
  • California
  • World Water

 

 Friends of the Earth-Middle East

 

http://www.foeme.org/  

Friends of the Earth Middle East (FoEME) is a unique organization that brings together Jordanian, Palestinian, and Israeli environmentalists.

Objectives

 

Our primary objective is the promotion of cooperative efforts to protect our shared environmental heritage. In so doing, we seek to advance both sustainable regional development and the creation of necessary conditions for lasting peace in our region. FoEME has offices in Amman, Bethlehem, and Tel-Aviv. FoEME is a member of Friends of the Earth International, the largest grassroots environmental organization in the world. 

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

 

 

 

Gender and Water Alliance

 

http://www.genderandwater.org/ 

 

GWA is a global network dedicated to mainstream gender in water resoures management. It is registered as an Association under Dutch law and has more than 1800 members in 120 countries worldwide. Its membership is diverse and represents a wide range of capacities and expertise across all water sectors as well as from different stakeholder groups including government, grassroots organisations, NGOs, universities and research institutes, international agencies and individual consultants. More than eighty percent of the membership comes from a diversity of countries in Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East.

 

 

Objectives

 

The mission of GWA is to promote women’s and men’s equitable access to and management of safe and adequate water, for domestic supply, sanitation, food security and environmental sustainability. GWA believes that equitable access to and control over water is a basic right for all, as well as a critical factor in promoting poverty eradication and sustainability.

 

 

Promotion in the Water Sector  

 

 

 

Global Water

 

http://www.globalwater.org/ 

 

Global Water is an international, non-profit, humanitarian organization founded in 1982. We’re focused on creating safe water supplies, sanitation facilities and hygiene-related facilities for rural villagers in developing countries. We believe the lack of safe drinking water and sanitation facilities are the root causes of hunger, disease and poverty throughout the developing world. Our water projects have an immediate life-changing impact, particularly for women and children, who have the responsibility to gather water for their families every day of their lives in the developing world. Successful Global Water projects utilize water and sanitation as a tool to create sustainable socioeconomic development in these poor rural communities.

 

Objectives

1.) Global Water investigates and identifies local, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in a developing country that are currently working with rural water supply projects.

Often there are local organizations in developing countries that have water infrastructure expertise and are already working with rural villages in need of a safe water supply. We call these organizations “water-advocacy” NGOs. A suitable water-advocacy NGO will have the following characteristics:

• provide leadership necessary to liaison (and create a relationship with) water project recipients;
• provide organizational expertise to plan a project with Global Water’s help;
• provide on-site skilled supervision throughout the project;
• provide after-project continuity to monitor equipment installed during project construction and provide   maintenance, as needed;

2.) Global Water works closely with local water-advocacy NGOs in a developing country to identify suitable water projects in rural villages of their country.

Global Water travels to developing countries we are working in to inspect potential project sites and to conduct water quality sampling, as required.

3.) Global Water helps local water-advocacy NGOs determine what equipment is essential to satisfy the requirements of a particular project.

In particular, Global Water’s Program Manager and technical advisors will help determine if disinfection or other water treatment technologies are necessary to satisfy the requirements of a particular water project. Relatively simple technologies (such as spring catchment and rain catchment water supply systems, slow-sand filtration treatment equipment and ferro-cement storage tanks) will be the first technologies to be considered; however, if conditions allow, state-of-the-art technologies will also be considered when more sophisticated water treatment is warranted.

4.) Global Water provides partial to full funding for the project.

Besides the funding provided by Global Water, a small % of the funding (approximately 10%) necessary for a completed water project must come from the recipients of the water project either up-front or in the form of a stipend paid as the water supply system is used; this funding can also be paid in terms of materials, such as gravel, sand and cement, as needed. In addition, all unskilled labor must be provided by the recipients of the water project for the entire duration of the project construction period.

5.) Provide specialty water-related equipment to local water-advocacy NGOs.

Global Water purchases water treatment equipment not available in a particular developing country and ships it to the local NGOs for installation and use.

6.) Provide technical expertise to local water-advocacy NGOs during a project to help with project management, equipment installation and training.

Global Water communicates with local NGOs to insure problems that arise are corrected quickly and money is managed efficiently. Global Water helps with calculations necessary to size equipment and distribution pipelines and furnishes equipment training materials, such as installation and operation manuals, as required.

7.) Inspect completed projects and maintain continuity with a project site through the local water-advocacy NGO.

Global Water travels to developing countries we are working in to inspect completed project sites and to conduct water quality sampling, as required. We maintain a relationship with a project site by supporting the water project recipients with consulting, training and repair parts that will be installed with the help of the local water-advocacy NGO that installed the equipment.

8.) Global Water may assemble Water and Technical Emergency Response (W.A.T.E.R.) Teams to perform project work in developing countries.

Depending upon a particular project requirement, Global Water may assemble W.A.T.E.R. Teams to help local non-profit organizations with specific project work in a developing country. These teams are especially helpful during emergency crises events, such as natural disasters. These team members are typically trained volunteers that donate their time to perform technical, equipment-oriented humanitarian projects. They come from varied backgrounds, but most have a previous connection to the water supply and water equipment industries. Many are technically-oriented and retired or semi-retired who love to work on humanitarian projects to bring safe, clean water to people in need. They want to make a difference in the world -- and they do!

Promotion in the Water Sector

 

 http://globalwater.org/completed.htm

 

 

 

 

Global Water Challenge

 

http://www.globalwaterchallenge.org/home/

 

Global Water Challenge (GWC) is a coalition of leading organizations in the water and sanitation sector. Drawing upon the experience, expertise and assets of its 24 members, GWC is able to create partnerships that achieve far greater results than any one organization could achieve by itself.

 

Objectives

CONNECTING.

GWC is a platform for collaboration that unites corporations, implementing nonprofits, research institutes, and governmental agencies in partnerships that leverage their unique resources and expertise. In addition, GWC connects citizens with policymakers to increase the priority placed on water and sanitation globally.

INVESTING.

GWC has invested in and collaborated with members on more than a dozen innovative programs in countries around the world. Some examples include:

Schools Programs: GWC's investment in schools programs has benefited nearly 500,000 students in Kenya, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Tanzania, and Mexico. These programs have enhanced children's health and education, paving the way for more opportunities for the students, their families and their countries.

Ashoka Changemakers: In 2008, GWC and Ashoka Changemakers partnered to find and support social entrepreneurs with groundbreaking approaches to water and sanitation delivery.

 

LEARNING.

GWC is committed to improving the long-term impact of investments in the sector. Working with its members and other partners, GWC identifies and shares important lessons learned and best practices to improve future outcomes.

Building off the successes of its first three years, GWC formed a strategic alliance with the Global Environment & Technology Foundation (GETF) in April 2010. GETF's experience in creating public-private partnerships will help GWC achieve its mission of accelerating the flow of clean water and sanitation to those most in need.

 

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

 

Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Education in Schools and Communities

 

Found http://www.globalwaterchallenge.org/programs/projects.php

 

 

 

Global Green USA

http://www.globalgreen.org/ 

Founded in 1994 by activist and philanthropist Diane Meyer Simon, Global Green is the American Arm of Green Cross International (GCI), which was created by President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to foster a global value shift toward a sustainable and secure future by reconnecting humanity with the environment.

Global Green USA is the only national environmental non-profit headquartered in Southern California with offices in New Orleans, Washington DC, and New York, and is one of over 31 national GCI affiliates throughout the world.

Objectives

Global Green is working to address some of the greatest challenges facing humanity. In the United States our work is primarily focused on fighting global climate change by creating green buildings and cities.

Internationally, Global Green and its affiliates are working toward:

  • Eliminating weapons of mass destruction that threaten lives and the environment
  • Providing clean, safe drinking water for the 2.4 billion people who lack access to clean water

Promotion in the Water Sector

http://www.globalgreen.org/water/

 

H2O for Life

http://www.h2oforlifeschools.org/ 

A nonprofit, all-volunteer organization run by teachers, parents, and students.

Objectives

H20 for Life aims to help students build an allegiance to and an understanding of their partner school through curriculum and experiential learning while raising funds for WASH in Schools projects.

Budget

100 percent of contributions raised by schools goes directly to partner school projects. All overhead expenses are funded through in-kind donations and grants.

Promotion in the Water Sector

H20 for Life connects schools in the United States with schools in developing countries to complete WASH (WAter, Sanitation, and Hygiene) in Schools projects.

 

International Association of Hydro-Geologists (IAH)

http://www.iah.org/

Since 1956 an international forum on the management of groundwater for the benefit of mankind and the environment

IAH is a scientific and educational organisation whose aims are to promote research into and understanding of the proper management and protection of groundwater for the common good throughout the world.

IAH has over 3800 members in 135 countries and welcomes all who support our objectives to join our Association. You can follow the links below to find out more about groundwater and groundwater events, about the benefits of membership of IAH , how the Association is run and about our activities.

Objectives

IAH works to promote awareness of groundwater with these organizations:

Promotion in the Water Sector

IAH encourages education and technology transfer worldwide, and welcomes suggestions from its members and working partners to enable this to happen.

IAH Burdon Groundwater Network
The IAH Burdon Network is a catalyst for improving support to and resources for groundwater professionals in developing countries. Rural water supply in Sub-Saharan Africa has been the area of initial focus, because of the internationally recognised need. In recent years the Network has contributed to a Kampala climate change conference, published a series of papers on groundwater in Africa and organised a book distribution scheme, and continues to help foster communication between members in developing countries and encourage the formation of new national chapters.

Go to: http://www.iah.org/burdon/default.htm 

 

International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) 

http://iahs.info/ 

Hydrological sciences e-journals and publications

 

International Association for Water Law (IAWL)

http://www.aida-waterlaw.org/ 

The International Association for Water Law,
usually referred to as AIDA from its Spanish acronym,
was created in Washington, D.C., the USA, on 30 May 1967
during the Water for Peace Conference when the need
for an NGO to provide a forum for questions concerning
water law became evident.

The Association is a private, non-profit, international organization comprised of lawyers specialized in water law and of non-lawyers directly involved in the management of water resources. The Headquarters of the Secretariat are currently located in the offices of the Chairman of the Executive Council in Switzerland.

Objectives

The purpose of the Association is to foster the
evolution, study, understanding and application
of water law, national and international, with a view to
raising awareness, and the knowledge and practice,
of this field of the law of natural resources.

Promotion in the Water Sector 

The Association has consultative status with the ECOSOC of the United Nations and with a number of its specialized agencies, as well as with the World Bank.

 

 

 

 

International Commission on Large Dams (ICOLD)

 

http://www.icold-cigb.net/ 

 

The International Commission on Large Dams (ICOLD) is a non-governmental International Organization which provides a forum for the exchange of knowledge and experience in dam engineering.

Objectives

 

The Organization leads the profession in ensuring that dams are built safely, efficiently, economically, and without detrimental effects on the environment. Its original aim was to encourage advances in the planning, design, construction, operation, and maintenance of large dams and their associated civil works, by collecting and disseminating relevant information and by studying related technical questions.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

 

Since the late sixties, focus was put on subjects of current concern such as dam safety, monitoring of performance, reanalysis of older dams and spillways, effects of ageing and environmental impact. More recently, new subjects include cost studies at the planning and construction stages, harnessing international rivers, information for the public at large, and financing.

 

 

International Medical Corps

 

http://www.internationalmedicalcorps.org/

 

International Medical Corps is a global, humanitarian, nonprofit organization dedicated to saving lives and relieving suffering through health care training and relief and development programs. Established in 1984 by volunteer doctors and nurses, International Medical Corps is a private, voluntary, nonpolitical, nonsectarian organization.

 

Objectives

 

Its mission is to improve the quality of life through health interventions and related activities that build local capacity in underserved communities worldwide. By offering training and health care to local populations and medical assistance to people at highest risk, and with the flexibility to respond rapidly to emergency situations, International Medical Corps rehabilitates devastated health care systems and helps bring them back to self-reliance.

 

International Medical Corps Worldwide is a global humanitarian alliance that comprises the resources and capabilities of two independent affiliate organizations, International Medical Corps and International Medical Corps UK. Together, our mission is to save lives and relieve suffering through the provision of health care and training. With headquarters in the United States and the United Kingdom respectively, we collaborate to maximize resources for the delivery of appropriate relief and development activities

International Medical Corps focuses on the delivery of community-based primary health care.  We emphasize training and education, and prioritize hiring local staff – in fact, 96% of our field-based staff and health professionals are recruited from the local community. This helps to ensure that skills and knowledge are passed on and remain long after our programs have ended. Through the integration of specialties like emergency medicine, women’s health, nutrition services, water and sanitation, and mental health into the primary health care setting, we ensure that those we serve receive holistic, comprehensive care.

Within the foundation of primary health care delivery, we have developed the following program priorities:

 

Budget

 

International Medical Corps is one of the most efficient and effective international relief and development charities operating today. We spend 93 percent of our operating budget on programs, ensuring that your donations have maximum impact on the victims of war, disease, and disaster in more than 25 countries and regions around the world in which we work. In short, International Medical Corps makes your money count.

 

Promotion in the water sector

 

We incorporate water and sanitation into our community-based programs so that public health is not only possible, but sustainable.  We build wells, latrines, and large-scale water treatment and waste management systems so that communities, even in the world’s most water-stressed areas, are no longer threatened by waterborne illness.

 

 

 

 

 

International Office for Water

 

http://www.oieau.fr/spip.php?sommaire&lang=en

 

The INTERNATIONAL OFFICE FOR WATER (IOW) is a non-profit-making Association

 

Objectives

 

The objective of International Office for Water is to gather public and private partners involved in water resources management and protection in France, Europe and in the world 

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

 

▸ International cooperation

IOWater’s Department of International Cooperation, located at Sophia Antipolis, provides institutional and technical assistance within bilateral or multilateral projects for institutional support to governments, municipalities, agencies and public companies for accompanying administrative reforms in the field of water.

▸ Integrated Water Ressource Management (IWRM)

The International Office for Water has great and internationally-recognized experience in the field of transboundary IWRM and also knows very well the West African context

▸ Governance of public drinking water supply and sanitation utilities

▸ Training the Water professionals

Ensuring the availability of the water resource, preventing floods, preserving aquatic environments, making drinking water and sanitation accessible for everyone are major stakes for our societies. For such a purpose, it is necessary to create organizations, to build infrastructures, to build and operate plants. But, first of all, it is necessary that the men and women, who have to make decisions, to design, exploit, manage, have the necessary abilities. Capacity building has always been at the core of IOWater activities.

▸ Water Information Systems: organization, design and operation

Access to the information on the status and evolution of the resource and uses is a major stake for water policy: should it be regulatory actions, planning, risk management or public information, the managers of water resources, communities and operators, … regularly need to have reliable, up-dated and relevant information.

▸ Expert reports, studies and strategic assistance

IOWater has many references in Facilitating good governance of water policies, Combining technical and scientific, legal and financial but also prospective skills, and Supporting local policies

▸ Promotion of exchanges between water stakeholders

IOWater is managing and participating in several networks in France, Europe and in the world.

▸ Water management for agriculture

The significance of water for agriculture and thus for feeding the populations has not to be proven anymore, but further still, agricultural water seems one of the major factors for the development of developing economies. Relying on the French experience, IOWater is thus involved in this area of water resources management.

 

 

 

International Rivers

 

http://www.internationalrivers.org/ 

 

International Rivers (formerly known as International Rivers Network or IRN), was founded in 1985 and the focus of our work is in Latin America, Asia and Africa.

We seek a world in which rivers and the life they support are valued, and where all people have a voice in decisions affecting their lives and livelihoods. We work toward a world where everyone has access to clean water and energy, and where development projects neither degrade nature nor destroy communities.

 

Objectives

International Rivers' mission is to protect rivers and defend the rights of communities that depend on them. We oppose destructive dams and the development model they advance, and encourage better ways of meeting people’s needs for water, energy and protection from damaging floods. To achieve this mission, we collaborate with a global network of local communities, social movements, non-governmental organizations and other partners. Through research, education and advocacy, International Rivers works to halt destructive river infrastructure projects, address the legacies of existing projects, improve development policies and practices, and promote water and energy solutions for a just and sustainable world. The primary focus of our work is in the global South.

International Rivers seeks a world in which rivers and the ecosystems they support are valued, and the importance of the links between healthy environments and healthy societies are understood. We envision a world where development projects neither degrade nature nor impoverish people, and where all people have a voice in decisions affecting their lives and livelihoods.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

 

International Rivers works to protect rivers and rights, and promote real solutions for meeting water, energy and flood management needs around the globe. Our main campaign regions and topics are listed below. More info found on projects here http://www.internationalrivers.org/en/our-work

 

 

International Water and Sanitation Centre (IRC)

 

http://www.irc.nl/  http://www.irc.nl/page/104

 

 

Bridging the knowledge gap and joint learning with partners for improved, low-cost water supply, sanitation and hygiene in developing countries.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

 

Projects  http://www.irc.nl/page/101  

 

International Water Association (IWA) 

http://www.iwahq.org/Home/

 

The International Water Association is a global reference point for water professionals, spanning the continuum between research and practice and covering all facets of the water cycle. Through its network of members and experts in research, practice, regulation, industry, consulting and manufacturing, IWA is in a better position than any other organization to help water professionals create innovative, pragmatic and sustainable solutions to challenging global needs.

IWA themes

The work and activities of our members, wheter thorugh established mechanisms like specialist groups, task groups, at confrences or in print, is complemeted by a range of activities divided into strategic themes and programmes. They are designed to facilitate members' engagement on issues which are considered critical to the water sector's wider development.

Cities of the Future

Developing new paradigms for highly efficient urban water services in new and existing cities throughout the world.

Read more

Managing utilities and their assets

Enabling utilities to meet the evolving service challenges and tripple bottom line objectives in developing and developed countries, this programme covers everything between strategic asset management to operation and maintenance.

Read more

Science and application of water management

Exploring advances in fundamental water science, research and technology development related to urban drainage and the treatment of water, wastewater and stormwater.

Read more

Water and health

Enabling utilities to meet the evolving service challenges and tripple bottom line objectives in developing and developed countries this programme covers everything between strategic management to operation and maintenance.

Read more

Water, climate and energy

Developing strategies for adapting and optimising water services in the context of population growth, climate change and related energy impacts.

Read more

 

International Water Resources Association (IWRA)

 

http://196.36.166.88/iwra/ 

 

IWRA has strived to improve water management worldwide through dialogue, education, and research for over 35 years. Since its official formation in 1972, the organization has actively promoted the sustainable management of water resources around the globe. The world is a much smaller place today than when IWRA began its work due to advancing technologies and global social changes. The belief that sustainability requires interdisciplinary action and international cooperation is a driving force behind the association. IWRA seeks to improve water resource outcomes by improving our collective understanding of the physical, biological, chemical, institutional, and socioeconomic aspects of water.

IWRA is committed to the sound management of water resources through:

  • advancing water resources and related environmental research promoting water resources
  • education improving exchanges of information and expertise networking with other
  • organizations who share common interests and goals providing an international forum
  • on water resource issues

IWRA is about networking. Networking the people, information, and organizations that are vitally concerned with the global sustainability of water resources. IWRA is one of the founding members of the World Water Council and played a key role in its formation as an organization committed to global water policy. IWRA is committed to its members and their professional development and advancement.

IWRA provides its members with access to the latest in information, programs, and international experts. The present leadership of IWRA is strongly committed to the goals of the organization and to providing the membership with a quality organization.

 

 

Life Water

 

http://www.lifewater.org/ 

 

Lifewater International is a Christian not-for-profit development organization that believes all people should have safe water for life. With a focus on sustainability, Lifewater helps communities gain safe water, adequate sanitation, effective hygiene, and the skills they need to pass on these resources to future generations.

 

Objectives

 

Compelled by God’s call and the global water and sanitation crisis,
Lifewater International equips partner organizations and works with
them to empower communities in developing countries to gain safe water,
adequate sanitation, effective hygiene, and the knowledge of Jesus’ love.

Our vision is a world where every person has access to safe water, improved health,
and the knowledge of Jesus’ love.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

To carry out our mission, Lifewater has developed three program areas - Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH*) - to help our in-country partners be more effective in the communities in which they work. Generally speaking, a Lifewater “project” consists of the implementation of one or more WASH program area with a national partner. See our strategy section for more information on how Lifewater works with in-country partners.

Lifewater's WASH program areas involve the application of technology, but technology by itself will not bring about positive change in a community. Before any improvement in technology can be effective, communities must understand, embrace, and take ownership of the changes. Without this level of community involvement, which generally takes considerable time to develop, a new technology is not likely to be sustainable.

Lifewater’s programs emphasize full participation of the community, with the goal of community ownership of any new technology. The courses in Effective Community Development introduce principles and practices that foster community participation. Furthermore, we try to ensure that we are using appropriate technologies so that the community can maintain them.

  • Well drilling
  • Sanitation: Latrines
  • WASH Promotion
  • Hand Pump Repair
  • Community Health through Hygiene
  • Effective Community Development
  • Water Treatment
  • WASH in schools

 

 

Mercy Corps

http://www.mercycorps.org/ 

Mercy Corps helps people in the world’s toughest places turn the crises of natural disaster, poverty and conflict into opportunities for progress. Driven by local needs and market conditions, our programs provide communities with the tools and support they need to transform their own lives. Our worldwide team of 3,700 professionals is improving the lives of 16.7 million people in more than 40 countries.

For information regarding Budget  link to : http://www.mercycorps.org/financials

Promotion in the Water Sector 

Water/Sanitation

Water is essential for life, good health and economic development — yet more than one billion people lack access to clean water. Mercy Corps' work fulfills the water needs of vulnerable populations: We pipe clean drinking water to rural communities, help solve resource-based conflicts and deliver water to families during emergencies.

 

 

 

The Millennium Water Alliance

http://www.mwawater.org/ 

At the 2002 World Summit for Sustainable Development, then Secretary of State Colin Powell announced the U.S. commitment to the Goals for Sustainable Development. One goal is to “reduce by half, the proportion of people without access to safe and affordable drinking water and sanitation” by the year 2015.

To help reach these critical goals, leading U.S. based, non-governmental organizations formed the Millennium Water Alliance (MWA). The MWA is a cooperating group of U.S. humanitarian and faith-based NGOs working to assist poor communities in the developing world gain access to safe water and sanitation.

The Millennium Water Alliance (MWA) was created to help 500 million people obtain water and basic sanitation by 2015, also known as the Millennium Development Goal. Our vision mirrors our belief that no one should die or suffer chronic illness as the result of a water-related disease.

Objectives

Our mission is to assist people in developing countries with access to safe water, sanitation and hygiene education by offering sustainable solutions through advocacy, learning and collaborative programming. The Millennium Water Alliance seeks a world where everybody is able to use safe water, has access to basic sanitation and practices good hygiene.

Promotion in the Water Sector

 

The Millennium Water Alliance is the only organization in the world dedicated solely to meeting the Millennium Development Goal related to water set by world leaders in 2000 – and we’re the only organization that has the potential to actually achieve those goals.  The objective is clear, and we are uniquely positioned to reach it because of our:

  • Permanent Alliance of 13 water-focused NGOs
  • Global Reach
  • Focus on sharing the best techniques and strategies across all partners
  • Ability to make the case for very large donations to the water sector

 

 

 

The MWA is a unique permanent alliance of international NGOs with experience in water supply, hygiene education and promotion of sanitation. We facilitate cooperation with international and local NGOs and other stakeholders in the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) sector to build consensus on appropriate WASH policies and effective solutions.

 

 

Pacific Institute

 

http://www.pacinst.org/topics/water_and_sustainability/ 

 

The Pacific Institute is a nonpartisan research institute that works to advance environmental protection, economic development, and social equity.

 

Objectives

 

We envision a world where the basic needs of all people are met, where resources are managed sustainably and the natural world protected, and where conflicts over resources are resolved in a peaceful and democratic fashion.

 

The Pacific Institute works to create a healthier planet and sustainable communities. We conduct interdisciplinary research and partner with stakeholders to produce solutions that advance environmental protection, economic development, and social equity—in California, nationally, and internationally.

 

Budget

The Pacific Institute is a tax-exempt 501(c)(3) organization established in 1987, dedicated to protecting our natural world, encouraging sustainable development, and improving global security.

Promotion in the Water Sector

 

The Pacific Institute currently has three main programs of research: Water, Community Strategies for Sustainability and Justice, and Globalization. In addition, the Institute focuses on four initiatives: International Water and Communities, Water Use in Business, Climate Impacts and Adaptation, and Integrity of Science.

 

 

Stockholm International Water Institute

 

http://www.siwi.org/about

 

The Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) is a policy institute whose diverse Stockholm-based, internationally-oriented programmes and activities contribute to finding sustainable solutions to the world’s escalating water crisis. SIWI manages projects, synthesises research and publishes findings and recommendations on current and future water, environment, governance and human development issues. SIWI serves as a platform for knowledge sharing and networking between the scientific, business, policy and civil society communities. SIWI builds professional capacity and understanding of the links between water-society-environment-economy. 

In all of its work, SIWI advocates future-oriented, knowledge-integrated water views in decision making, nationally and internationally, that lead to sustainable use of the world’s water resources, sustainable development of societies and reduced poverty. SIWI stresses that water is a key to socio-economic development and quality of life, and that through Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM), barriers which hinder increased food production, drinking water availability, sanitation coverage, health advances, pollution prevention and poverty reduction can be overcome.

Objectives

By creating opportunities for dialogue and collaboration between water experts and decision makers, SIWI stimulates the development of innovative policies and scientifically based solutions to water-related problems. This is necessary in order to achieve the UN Millennium Development Goals and the water-related targets which were agreed upon at the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development in Johannesburg.

Internationally active, politically neutral, and intellectually objective, SIWI welcomes opportunities for collaboration with partners across the world.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

 

Swedish Water House

The Swedish Water House, administered by SIWI, is a government-funded initiative that promotes network building among Sweden-based, internationally oriented academic institutions, consultants, government agencies, NGOs, research institutes and other stakeholders interested in sharing water knowledge and expertise amongst themselves and with the global community. Through the work of its cluster groups and network partners, the Swedish Water House is involved in a wide-array of activities to strengthen the links between research, policy, and practice and mobilise Swedish competencies for an increased involvement in international water issues.

Water Governance Facility

The UNDP Water Governance Facility at SIWI works to improve water governance reform and implementation. The programme, developed by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) and funded by UNDP and Sida, provides policy support and advice to government agencies, civil society organisations and other stakeholders in developing countries to improve water governance and advance socially equitable, environmentally sustainable and economically efficient management of water resources. The facility operates in multiple thematic areas, including: integrated water resources management, transboundary water, water supply and sanitation, climate variability, gender, and capacity building.

 

UNPD is the host and organizer of World Water Week. For more info go to: http://www.siwi.org/worldwaterweek   

 

Parnerships http://www.siwi.org/partnerships

 

 

UN Water

 

http://www.unwater.org/flashindex.html  http://www.unwater.org/downloads/UNW_brochure_EN_webversion.pdf

 

UN-Water strengthens coordination and coherence among UN entities dealing with issues related to all aspects of freshwater and sanitation. This includes surface and groundwater resources, the interface between freshwater and seawater and water-related disasters.

 

UN-Water, an inter-agency mechanism formally established in 2003 by the United Nations High Level Committee on Programmes, has evolved out of a history of close collaboration among UN agencies. It was created to add value to UN initiatives by fostering greater co-operation and information-sharing among existing UN agencies and outside partners. UN-Water focuses on:

 

Providing information, policy briefs and other communication materials for policymakers and managers who work directly with water issues, other decision-makers

that have an influence on how water is used, as well as the general public.

 

Building the knowledge base on water issues through efficient monitoring and

reporting systems and facilitating easy access to this knowledge through regular

reports and the Internet.

 

Providing a platform for system-wide discussions to identify challenges in global

water management, analyse options for meeting these challenges and ensuring that

reliable information and sound analysis informs the global policy debate on water.

 

 

Objectives

 

The scope of UN-Water’s work encompasses all aspects of freshwater and

sanitation, including surface and groundwater resources and the interface

between freshwater and seawater and water-related disasters.

 

UN-Water was established to promote coherence and coordination in UN

System initiatives that are related to UN-Water’s scope of work and contribute

to the implementation of the agenda defined by the 2000 Millennium

Declaration and the 2002 World Summit on Sustainable Development.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

 

Focus areas

 

  • Integrated water resources management
  • Drinking-water, sanitation and health
  • Water scarcity
  • Pollution
  • Transboundary waters
  • Climate change and disaster risk management
  • Gender and water
  • Financing and valuation
  • Capacity building
  • Africa: a region for priority action
  • Flagship Reports
  • World Water Development Report
  • WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme Reports
  • Global Annual Assessment on Sanitation and Drinking Water

 

Programmes

 

  • World Water Assessment Programme (WWAP)
  • The WHO / UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme on Water Supply and Sanitation (JMP)
  • UN-Water Decade Programme on Capacity Development (UNW-DPC)
  • The UN-Water Decade Programme on Advocacy and Communication (UNW-DPAC)

 

Unesco-IHE Institute for Water Education

 

http://www.unesco-ihe.org/ 

 

The UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education is an international institute for water education that was established in 2003. UNESCO-IHE continues the work that was started in 1957 when IHE first offered a postgraduate diploma course in hydraulic engineering to practicing professionals from developing countries.

 

UNESCO-IHE is instrumental in strengthening the efforts of other universities and research centres to increase the knowledge and skills of professionals working in the water sector.

 

The member states of UNESCO have access to the knowledge and services of UNESCO-IHE in human and institutional capacity building, which is vital in their efforts to achieve the Millennium Development Goals, the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation (Agenda 21) and other global water objectives.

 

Objectives

UNESCO-IHE envisages a world in which people manage their water and environmental resources in a sustainable manner, and in which all sectors of society, particularly the poor, can enjoy the benefits of basic services.

The mandate given by UNESCO to IHE is to:

  • strengthen and mobilise the global educational and knowledge base for integrated water resources management; and
  • contribute to meeting the water-related capacity building needs of developing countries and countries in transition.

Within this mandate, the mission of the Institute is to:

  • contribute to the education and training of professionals and to build the capacity of sector organisations, knowledge centres and other institutions active in the fields of water, the environment and infrastructure in developing countries and countries in transition.

Promotion in the Water Sector

  • Serving as an international standard-setting body for postgraduate water education programmes and continuing professional training;
  • Building human and institutional capacities through education, training and research;
  • Setting up and managing networks of educational and water sector institutions and organisations worldwide;
  • Functioning as a ‘policy forum’ for UNESCO member states and other stakeholders; and
  • Providing advice on water education to partner organisations and other members of the UN water family.

UNESCO-IHE provides a wide range of services to a variety of target groups in developing countries and countries in transition:

  • Education, training and research – for water sector professionals, engineers, scientists, consultants and decision-makers working in the water, environment and infrastructure sectors.
  • Water sector capacity building – for water sector ministries and departments, municipalities, water boards and water utilities, universities, training and research institutes, industries, non-governmental and private sector organisations.
  • Partnership building and networking – among knowledge centres, public and private sector organisations.
  • Standard setting for education and training – for water-related institutions, universities and other education and training agencies in the water sector.
  • Policy forum on water – for UNESCO member states and other stakeholders.


http://www.unesco-ihe.org/About/UNESCO-Water  :

 

UNESCO is committed to implementing the international water agenda, consisting primarily of promoting integrated water resources management, and achieving the Millennium Development Goals and the targets laid out in the Johannesburg Plan of Implementation (Agenda 21).

UNESCO also serves as lead agency for the UN Decade on Education for Sustainable Development (2005–2014).

UNESCO’s work in the water sector is built on the following pillars:

At its heart is the long-standing International Hydrological Programme (IHP) , now carried out in collaboration with academic and professional institutions, the IHP National Committees, and the governments of UNESCO’s member states.

UNESCO Water-related Chairs are joint undertakings between UNESCO and interested parties. They can be established as teaching or research facilities at a university or other higher education or research institute.

The UNESCO-IHE Institute for Water Education , as well as some 10 associated regional and international centres around the world .

The World Water Assessment Programme (WWAP) , a joint initiative of 24 bodies of the United Nations system. The UN WWAP, hosted by UNESCO, issued the first World Water Development Report in 2003 and the second in 2006.

All together form the UNESCO Water Family.

More information

 

Unicef

http://www.unicef.org/wes/index.html     http://www.unicef.org/  

We work in 190 countries through country programmes and National Committees. We are UNICEF, the United Nations Children’s Fund.

http://www.unicef.org/wash/index.html  :

UNICEF works in more than 90 countries around the world to improve water supplies and sanitation facilities in schools and communities, and to promote safe hygiene practices. We sponsor a wide range of activities and work with many partners, including families, communities, governments and like-minded organizations. In emergencies we provide urgent relief to communities and nations threatened by disrupted water supplies and disease. All UNICEF WASH programmes are designed to contribute to the Millennium Development Goal for water and sanitation: to halve, by 2015, the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe water and basic sanitation.

USAID

http://www.usaid.gov/

USAID is an independent federal government agency that receives overall foreign policy guidance from the Secretary of State. Our Work supports long-term and equitable economic growth and advances U.S. foreign policy objectives by supporting:

  • economic growth, agriculture and trade;
  • global health; and,
  • democracy, conflict prevention and humanitarian assistance.

We provide assistance in five regions of the world:

Objectives

USAID’s programs in natural resource management are closely linked with programs to improve health, increase agricultural productivity, mitigate or adapt to climate change, and even governance – in this case, governance of the environment.

Promotion in the Water Sector

USAID’s natural resource management efforts focus on recognizing and sustaining aquatic ecosystem services as the foundation for further sustainable development. The agency explores opportunities to protect, restore and rehabilitate aquatic systems, and chooses interventions based on sound science and meaningful analysis of costs and benefits.

USAID’s work on water-related natural resources management includes:

  • Watershed Protection and River Basin Management
  • Coastal Zone Management
  • Freshwater Ecosystems Management

 

Water Advocates

http://www.wateradvocates.org/ 

 

Water Advocates is the first US-based nonprofit organization dedicated solely to increasing American support for worldwide access to safe, affordable and sustainable supplies of drinking water, adequate sanitation and hygiene (WASH).

Our purpose is advocacy, not implementation of projects. Water Advocates works with all sectors of American society to increase public and private-citizen funding for effective water, sanitation and hygiene projects and initiatives internationally, particularly those characterized by strong community involvement.   

Objectives

 

Water Advocates' mission is to advocate on behalf of those people who lack safe water-- specifically at least 5 gallons per person per day--and basic sanitation.

 

Water Advocates' chief goal is to increase U.S. public and private funding for safe, affordable and sustainable drinking-water supplies and adequate sanitation worldwide. Water Advocates neither implements projects nor seeks donations for itself, but works to raise contributions for the water and sanitation sector as a whole. Our specific goal is to significantly increase by 2010 the amount of funding available for efficient water and sanitation projects from the U.S. Government and private U.S. sources such as civic organizations, faith communities, businesses and philanthropic foundations.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

 

Press releases, New York Times advertisements, blogs.

 

 

Water Integrity Network

 

http://www.waterintegritynetwork.net/

 

Objectives

The overall development aim of WIN is to reduce poverty by fighting corruption. Improved governance of water resources and services, such as through enhanced integrity, transparency, accountability and honesty, increases the chances of sustainable and equitable use of water and the expansion and effective delivery of water supply and sanitation. The Network’s specific objectives are to:

  • Promote increased awareness and understanding of corruption issues related to water;
  • Improve the information and knowledge base and disseminate effective anti-corruption methodologies and best practices relevant for organizations working with water;
  • Support practical actions to fight corruption in water;
  • Develop monitoring mechanisms relating to corruption in water; and
  • Encourage and support enhanced capacity development of governments, civil society, private sector and all other interested parties to undertake and coordinate activities, advocate and work together against corruption in water.

Budget

 

The Water Integrity Network is funded by grants from the Governments of Germany (BMZ), Sweden (SIDA), Switzerland (SDC), and The Netherlands (DGIS). Additional support for Water Integrity Action is generated through cooperation with strategic partners and members at international, regional and country levels. 

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

 

WIN aims to stimulate and encourage anti-corruption initiatives on different levels. Local, national and international cross-sector coalitions made up of people from all sectors have worked together to improve integrity in the water sector. WIN collaborates with organizations and individuals that view anti-corruption measures as central to sustainable development, economic efficiency and social equality by forming country coalitions. More information about WIN's country coalitions can be found below.

http://www.waterintegritynetwork.net/page/2793/

 

 

Water For People

 

http://www.waterforpeople.org/?cvridirect=true

 

 

Water For People helps people in developing countries improve quality of life by supporting the development of locally sustainable drinking water resources, sanitation facilities, and hygiene education programs.

 

Its vision is a world where all people have access to safe drinking water and sanitation, a world where no one suffers or dies from a water- or sanitation-related disease. That vision is within reach and they hope you’ll join them. 

 

 

Objectives

 

Water For People works to build a world where all people have access to safe drinking water and sanitation, and where no one suffers or dies from a water- or sanitation-related disease. This is their vision.

Water For People works with people and partners to develop innovative and long-lasting solutions to the water, sanitation, and hygiene problems in the developing world. They strive to continually improve, to experiment with promising new ideas, and to leverage resources to multiply our impact.

FOUR GUIDING PRINCIPLES. ONE HUMAN NEED.

They believe in people:
They respect the dignity of all people.

They keep it local:
They believe that water, sanitation, and hygiene problems are most effectively solved using local resources.

They keep good company:
They search out trusted partners who share our vision and work together to build long-term relationships based on trust.

They keep our promises:
They believe we owe it to the communities we serve, our volunteers, staff, and donors to act with integrity and manage our resources effectively and efficiently.

 

Budget

 

Water For People appreciates the loyal support of all our donors, including individuals, businesses, organizations, and governments. A strong and generous donor base helps us further our mission throughout the developing world.

Water For People is proud of its continuing ability to increase funds spent on program activities. In 2006, 82 cents out of every dollar donated was allocated to international programs and our work in the field. In both 2008 and 2009 this percentage stayed above 80%. This positions Water For People as one of the most efficient nonprofits in operation. Charity Navigator has rated Water For People as a four-star charity for seven straight years.

Additionally, Water For People takes the idea of accountability seriously. From our guiding principle of "keep good company" to our efforts to monitor all our work in the field, to our program to internally audit our country programs in addition to external audits, we're serious about accountability. Water For People welcomes inquiries from prospective donors. For more detailed financial information, please click on the links below to download Water For People's current Audited Financial Statements and Form 990s.

Link for annual financial reports: http://www.waterforpeople.org/about/financials/ 

 

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

 

The organization continued to grow and improve through the late 1990s and early 2000s. In 2007, Water For People provided more than 108,000 beneficiaries with safe drinking water resources and/or improved sanitation facilities. In 2008 we provided over 184,000 beneficiaries with the same. That number grew again in 2009 to over 325,000.

The American Water Works Association (AWWA) has designated Water For People as its charity of choice. In addition to AWWA, the Water Environment Federation, the Water Quality Association, the National Association of Water Companies, the National Association of Clean Water Agencies, the Association of Metropolitan Water Agencies, and other sectors of the North American water community, including leading manufacturing and consulting engineering companies, endorse Water For People.

Water For People work on projects in Africa, Asia, Central and South America.

At the local level

Water For People works in collaboration with a variety of other organizations and groups on the ground. First, the community is the central player. They bring the government, private sector, development organizations, and others to the table. Each must play their role and contribute to the success of the community.

They involve local municipalities and private sector companies in the planning, funding, and implementation of projects to ensure long-lasting results. The Water For People country coordinator connects these partners with the communities who have expressed a desire to change their lives through water resources and improved sanitation.

The community must be willing to contribute in-kind labor and funding to the entire project but is also a driving force in planning, implementation, operations, maintenance, and repair. Water For People does not believe in sending engineers and volunteer laborers into a community to build systems. Instead, community members are trained to build and maintain systems and to collect tariffs for ongoing operations. Water For People uses only locally available materials should repairs be needed. This ensures that community members take ownership and have the ability to keep systems operational.

At the regional level

Many organizations work at a project level. People working to supply water at a single school or to build a latrine in a household. Both are worthwhile endeavors and help people. However, Water For People is dedicated to long-lasting solutions and a focus on full coverage within entire districts or municipalities. The impact of this work is twofold.

First, by covering an entire district their work has to take into account both the easy locations and the difficult locations to serve, because they must diligently plan out and implement total coverage.

 

 

Second, success in an entire municipality is a noticeable event for the private sector, government, and the communities themselves. This builds awareness of this possibility, success, and higher demand for total water and sanitation coverage in large areas.

By focusing on full coverage of water and sanitation in a region (of whatever size), Water For People shows that innovation applies not just to technology but to How We Work as well.

 

Water Partners International

 

http://water.org/ 

 

Water.org is a U.S.-based nonprofit organization committed to providing safe drinking water and sanitation to people in developing countries.

 

Objectives

 

Our Vision

We envision the day when everyone in the world can take a safe drink of water. It is easy to take for granted ready access to a safe supply of drinking water. Yet nearly one billion people lack this most basic commodity. Creating accessible, safe water supplies in developing countries liberates people to live healthier, fuller, more productive lives.

Our Mission

Water.org is challenging the traditional approach to assisting people in developing countries. Our goals are to draw attention to the world’s number one health problem, unsafe and inadequate water supplies, and to raise funds to help fight this immense problem – one community at a time.
Our mission is to inspire people to act:

  • Donors – to provide consistent financial resources with a sense of solidarity for those in need of safe water
  • Staff and volunteers – to seek innovative and efficient solutions to meeting the global water supply needs of today and tomorrow
  • People in need of safe water – to take the lead in meeting their own needs

Together, these people form the “waterpartnership” that will allow us to realize our vision.

Develop high quality, sustainable water projects. We use our expertise to foster high-quality, sustainable, community-level water supply projects. We promote innovative solutions that enable communities to take a leading role in solving their own water supply problems.

Enable donors to invest wisely. We exist to create a global awareness of the water supply crisis and to help people respond. We carefully invest donors’ funds in only the highest quality projects through locally-based water development organizations. We hold ourselves accountable to donors and to people who benefit from the projects they support.

 

Budget

 

Water.org is a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. Water.org meets the Council of Better Business Bureaus’ Standards for Charitable Solicitations, and holds the Independent Charities of America’s “Best in America” seal of excellence.

 

Link for annual financial reports: http://water.org/about/finance/   

 

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

 

ach day, people in developing countries must walk long distances to get the water they need for drinking, cooking and bathing. Often, this water is contaminated.

Since its inception in1990, Water.org had helped hundreds of communities in Africa, Asia, and Central America gain access to safe water and sanitation. All of the projects we support are self-sustaining, with organizational and financial structures in place to allow communities to independently operate and maintain them. Projects have an active water committee governing the operation of the water system, and users paying a water bill to cover the costs of operating and maintaining the water system.

Links to projects: http://water.org/projects/

 

WaterAid

http://www.wateraid.org/

WaterAid is an international non governmental organisation. Our mission is to transform lives by improving access to safe water, hygiene and sanitation in the world's poorest communities.

Objectives

Vision

WaterAid's vision is of a world where everyone has access to safe water and sanitation.

Mission 

WaterAid transforms lives by improving access to safe water, hygiene and sanitation in the world's poorest communities. We work with partners and influence decision-makers to maximise our impact.

What we do

WaterAid enables the world's poorest people to gain access to safe water and sanitation. Together with improved hygiene, these basic human rights underpin health, education and livelihoods, forming the first essential step in overcoming poverty.

We work with local partners, who understand local issues, and provide them with the skills and support to help communities set up and manage practical and sustainable projects that meet their real needs.

We also work locally and internationally to change policy and practice and ensure that water, hygiene and sanitation's vital role in reducing poverty is recognised.

The new strategy has been launched with a companion video (http://www.wateraid.org/international/about_us/strategy/default.asp ), explaining in more detail our four new global aims, which are:

  1. To promote and secure poor people's rights and access to safe water, improved hygiene and sanitation
  2. To support governments and service providers in developing their capacity to deliver safe water, improved hygiene and sanitation
  3. To advocate for the essential role of safe water, improved hygiene and sanitation in human development
  4. To further develop as an effective global organisation recognised as a leader in our field and for living our values

Budget

Financial review 2008-09

Income

Total annual income rose by 9% to £43.8 million.

 

 

 

£million

Donations and gifts

22.0

Legacies

2.3

Fundraising events

3.1

Grants (voluntary income)

1.8

Grants (restricted)

12.5

Other

2.1

 

 

Promotion in the Water Sector 

WaterAid now works in 26 countries in Africa, Asia and the Pacific region to improve their quality of life through lasting improvements to water, sanitation and hygiene education using local skills and practical, sustainable technologies.

Links to the projects in various countries: http://www.wateraid.org/international/what_we_do/where_we_work/default.asp

 

World Business Council On Sustainable Development

http://www.wbcsd.org/templates/TemplateWBCSD5/layout.asp?MenuID=1

The World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) is a CEO-led, global association of some 200 companies dealing exclusively with business and sustainable development.

The Council provides a platform for companies to explore sustainable development, share knowledge, experiences and best practices, and to advocate business positions on these issues in a variety of forums, working with governments, non-governmental and intergovernmental organizations.

Members are drawn from more than 30 countries and 20 major industrial sectors. The Council also benefits from a global network of some 60 national and regional business councils and regional partners.

Objectives

The Council’s objectives are to:

  • Be a leading business advocate on sustainable development;
  • Participate in policy development to create the right framework conditions for business to make an effective contribution to sustainable human progress;
  • Develop and promote the business case for sustainable development;
  • Demonstrate the business contribution to sustainable development solutions and share leading edge practices among members;
  • Contribute to a sustainable future for developing nations and nations in transition.

Promotion in the Water Sector

The Council focuses on four key areas:

In addition, we have projects and initiatives covering the following topics:

Links to water related projects: http://www.wbcsd.org/templates/TemplateWBCSD5/layout.asp?type=p&MenuId=ODI&doOpen=1&ClickMenu=LeftMenu

 

World Commission on Dams

http://www.unep.org/dams/WCD/  

Brokered by the World Bank and the World Conservation Union (IUCN), the World Commission on Dams (WCD) was established in May 1998 in response to the escalating local and international controversies over large dams. It was mandated to:

  • review the development effectiveness of large dams and assessed alternatives for water resources and energy development; and
  • develop internationally acceptable criteria, guidelines and standards for the planning, design, appraisal, construction, operation, monitoring and decommissioning of dams.

The World Commission on Dams published its final report, entitled Dams and Development: a new framework for decision-making, in November 2000. The report is widely acknowledged as a significant contribution to the debate on dams, not only on the benefits and costs of large dams, but more generally to the current rethinking of development decision-making in a world deeply affected by rapid global change. In particular, its recommendation that decisions on major infrastructure developments take place within a framework that recognizes the rights of all stakeholders, and the risks that each stakeholder group is asked, or obliged to sustain, has been regarded as shifting the dams debate onto a new plane.

Objectives

Vision

The development and management of water and energy resources address the full range of options and are attained through institutionalised participatory and transparent decision-making processes to achieve sustainable outcomes that benefit all.

Mission 

Promote improved decision-making, planning and management of dams and their alternatives building on the World Commission on Dams core values and strategic priorities and other relevant reference materials through promoting multistakeholder dialogue at national, regional and global levels and producing non-prescriptive tools to help decision-makers.

The WCD's success is premised on a high degree of 'buy-in' by all interest groups in the dams debate. The Commission's mandate specifies that financial contributions should be sought from the public and private sectors as well as from civil society - essentially creating a new funding model for international commissions.

This funding strategy has been bedevilled by reluctance about the WCD's 'no-strings-attached' clause; scepticism about the Commission's chances of success; the suspicions and acrimonies associated with the dams debate; government donors' lengthy decision-making cycle; private sector's reluctance to invest in a process with no direct returns; and the chronic cash shortages of the NGO community.

However, by June 2000, 51 contributors had pledged funds equal to more than three-quarters of the Commission's total projected budget of about US$9,9 million. In fact more than half that amount was pledged in the first five months of the Commission's existence. Commitments came from NGOs, the private sector, governments in both the North and South, and multilateral agencies.

For an international commission that operates independent of governments, financing institutions, and interest groups, this may be an unprecedented model for international commissions. But perhaps the most significant aspect of this level of financial commitment, representing such diverse sources, is the extent to which it presents clear evidence of international interest in the WCD' s mandate and objectives.

The World Bank - itself an early contributor - has created a special Trust Fund account to facilitate multilateral contributions by governments and development agencies.

One of the WCD's most significant breakthroughs has been the approval of a United Nations Foundation partnership grant to the WCD and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). Governments, led by Germany and Norway, have so far committed US$3,5 million. They include Australia, Canada, China, Denmark, Finland, Ireland, Japan, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom and the United States of America. Corporate pledges so far total $893 000, led by ABB, as well as Hydro Quebec and ENRON. Substantial commitments have also been received from Siemens and Atlas Copco, as well as consultancy firms such as Harza Engineering, which assisted the WCD with its corporate fundraising efforts.

Commitments have also been made from the civil society sector. Thus far, the US-based C.S. MOTT Foundation, the Goldman Environmental Foundation, the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and the US National Wildlife Federation have pledged financial contributions to the WCD.

Promotion in the Water Sector

The Dams and Development Project (DDP) was a time bound project hosted by UNEP financed with contributions of donor countries. A multistakeholder Steering Committee representing the wider Dams and Development Forum provided guidance to UNEP on project substantive matters. The DDP was established in November 2001 in response to a request of the Third Forum meeting of the World Commission on Dams (WCD) for a neutral entity to take forward the consideration of the WCD recommendations into local contexts through promoting inclusive multi-stakeholder dialogue and, widely disseminating the WCD materials. In this regard, Phase 1, which extended until July 2004, was therefore mainly devoted to promoting dialogue at national, regional and global levels on the basis of WCD core values and strategic priorities; widely disseminating the WCD materials in English and other languages and exchanging information about WCD institutional and dialogue follow up activities. Based on the outcomes and experience of Phase 1, the focus of the Phase 2, launched in February 2005 and completed in 2007, shifted to promoting improved decision-making, planning and management of dams. The national, regional and global dialogues continue to be promoted, now as an avenue for producing broad based recommendations on policy and procedure reforms in the local context. In addition, the project was tasked with the production of non prescriptive practical tools to help decision makers. Networking, communication and dissemination continue to be ongoing activities in support the main objectives

Link to the WCD website: http://www.dams.org/ 

 

World Toilet Organization

http://www.worldtoilet.org/

World Toilet Organization (WTO) is a global non-profit organization committed to improving toilet and sanitation conditions worldwide. WTO is also one of the few organizations to focus on toilets instead of water, which receives more attention and resources under the common subject of sanitation. Founded in 2001 with 15 members, it now has 235 member organizations in 58 countries working towards eliminating the toilet taboo and delivering sustainable sanitation.

WTO was created as a global network and service platform wherein all toilet and sanitation organizations can learn from one another and leverage on media and global support that in turn can influence governments to promote sound sanitation and public health policies.

Objectives

Instead of seeing 2.5 billion toilet-less as underprivileged and helpless people, WTO visualizes 2.5 billion of potential customers demanding safe and affordable toilets. WTO is driving a market-based approach to address the dysfunctional sanitation market for the poor.

Dependence on donations is not enough to address the problem of such vast magnitude and scale. Further, toilet promotion on health reasons has not motivated poor to invest in toilets. WTO aims to emotionally connect with poor by branding toilets as status symbol and an object of desire. WTO is building an efficient market infrastructure wherein poor demands and there are products and services available to service them.

An alternative and a radical approach to accelerate accomplishing the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) target to reduce by half the proportion of the 2.5 billion people without access to basic sanitation by 2015.

We aim to achieve this through:

  • Advocacy and Awareness: Breaking the taboo on toilet and sanitation to make it a mainstream subject for improvement
  • World Toilet College: Capacity Building and Training to help people help themselves and others
  • Offer Networking Platform and Knowledge Management Hub
  • Building an Efficient Market Infrastructure for Sanitation
  • Demonstration of Sanitation Projects
  • Create Financing Tools through partnership with financial experts
  • Events: e.g. World Toilet Summit, World Toilet Day (November 19)

Budget

WTO is a Schwab Foundation Social Entrepreneur and an Ashoka Global Fellow. WTO was recently appointed to the World Economic Forum's Global Agenda Council on Water Security. 

Promotion in the Water Sector

WTO is the organizer of the very successful series of World Toilet Summits and World Toilet Expo and Forum. To-date, 9 World Toilet Summits and 2 World Toilet Expo & Forum have been hosted in 10 different cities around the world. Each summit addresses the critical issues of toilet and sanitation from technologies, development, funding, to design, maintenance, social entrepreneurship, capacity building, research and various other related topics, creating massive media coverage and momentum.

WTO also declared its founding day of November 19 as "World Toilet Day" and this is now being celebrated by members all over the world. Thus increasing awareness and generating local action for better sanitation.

In 2005, WTO started the world's first World Toilet College (WTC) providing training in toilet design, maintenance, School Sanitation and Disaster Sanitation and implementation of Sustainable Sanitation systems. WTO is also one of the founding members of the Sustainable Sanitation Alliance (SuSana), a coalition of 50 prominent organizations to promote sustainable sanitation systems.

In 2006, the Schwab Foundation, a family of the World Economic Forum, awarded the Outstanding Social Entrepreneur of the Year to WTO and made its founder a Schwab Foundation permanent fellow. In 2007, WTO was honored as an Ashoka Global Fellow for its excellence in social entrepreneurship.

In addition to advocacy, capacity building and sanitation projects, WTO is now driving a market-based strategy to address the dysfunctional sanitation market for the poor, by installing efficient market infrastructure. 

 

World Water Council

http://www.worldwatercouncil.org/ 

The World Water Council is an international multi-stakeholder platform. It was established in 1996 on the initiative of renowned water specialists and international organizations, in response to an increasing concern about world water issues from the global community.

Objectives

The World Water Council's mission is "to promote awareness, build political commitment and trigger action on critical water issues at all levels, including the highest decision-making level, to facilitate the efficient conservation, protection, development, planning, management and use of water in all its dimensions on an environmentally sustainable basis for the benefit of all life on earth."

By providing a platform to encourage debates and exchanges of experience, the Council aims to reach a common strategic vision on water resources and water services management amongst all stakeholders in the water community. In the process, the Council also catalyses initiatives and activities, whose results converge toward its flagship product, the World Water Forum.

The Council's action for the triennial period until 2006 is oriented in priority towards four areas that are meant to support and advance the water-related UN Millennium Development Goals. They are:

- Water, Human Rights and Politics

- Water, Institutions and Financing Capacity

- Water Services and Infrastructure

- Water and Environment

To fulfill its mission, the Council concentrates its influence on three main areas:

- Politics and power structures

- Development and improvement of policies and institutions

- Implementation and impact of policies

Among the wide range of activities carried out in order to achieve its objectives, the main Council event is the World Water Forum, which takes place once every three years. The Council also supports various dialogues, including cross-cutting ones, monitoring programs, workshops, publications, etc. All the Council's activities are conducted through committees, working groups and task forces, under the responsibility of the Board of Governors.

Through its wide membership of organizations throughout the world, the Council spreads information about the policy development processes it carries out in leading political, scientific and technical domains, in addition to practical perspectives and knowledge.

The Council, as an umbrella organization, follows three working principles:

  • It restricts itself to policy-related issues and addresses other issues only if they are cross-cutting or controversial;
  • It plays the role of facilitator for cross-cutting programs and does not do work that could be done by its members;
  • It cooperates with its members to identify the policy implications of their work and helps them to develop and promote these implications.

The Council is financed primarily through membership fees and additional support is provided by the host City of Marseilles. Specific projects and programs are financed through donations and grants from governments, international organizations and NGO's.

Promotion in the Water Sector 

March 1997 - The success of the First World Water Forum in Marrakech, Morocco, and the issuing of the Marrakech Declaration firmly established the leadership of the Council in water affairs.
The World Water Council received the mandate to develop the World Water Vision for Life and Environment for the 21st Century.

September 1997 - The First Meeting of the General Assembly of members of the World Water Council was held in Montreal, during the Ninth World Water Congress of the IWRA. The Constitution of the Council was approved and the members of the first Board of Governors were elected.

March 1998 - The World Water Council, in cooperation with the Government of France, participated in organizing the International Conference on Water and Sustainable Development in Paris.

March 2000 - The Second World Water Forum, was successfully held in The Netherlands. The results of the Vision were presented to some 5,700 participants from all parts of the world. The Ministerial Conference gathered 120 Ministers and resulted in the Declaration of The Hague on Water Security in the 21st Century.

March 2003 - The Third World Water Forum took place in Kyoto, Shiga and Osaka, Japan. Following up on its commintments from the 2nd Forum, the WWC launched the World Water Actions report, an inventory of over 3,000 local water actions. This Forum was the largest water conference in history, gathering 24,000 participants. A Ministerial Conference was held in parallel and brought together 130 Ministers. Participants made hundreds of commitments to action, and each session organizer was asked to state what concrete output would follow his or her respective session.

March 2006 - The Fourth World Water Forum was held in Mexico City, gathering some 20,000 people from throughout the world who participated in 206 working sessions, under the theme "local actions for a global challenge".

Acacia Water

http://www.acaciawater.com/

Acacia Water “for solutions in groundwater” was established in 2003 at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam (Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences). Acacia Water focuses on groundwater in relation to surface water, environment and infrastructure. This varies from implementation of field measurements and model calculations, to giving training and strategic advice. Acacia distinguishes itself by the cooperation with the University, as a result of which Acacia Water has access to the latest scientific developments in the field of hydrology and environment. We translate this knowledge to innovative and practical solutions.

The strength of Acacia Water is the specialization in the field of groundwater, while at the same time being able to place issues in a broader perspective and to link up with other fields of action. As a result we often work in a multidisciplinary environment with a broad variety of expertise.

The Acacia team exists of passionate and enthusiastic groundwater experts. In the past five years our expertise has been made available to a large range of clients, including the World Bank, UNESCO, UNICEF, the EU and national governments. In the Netherlands our main clients are waterboards, water supply companies and local- and regional governments. By continuing our involvement in international projects, particularly in the field of rural water supply, Acacia water continues to give content to its social responsibility.

 

Agence Francaise de Developpement 

http://www.afd.fr/jahia/Jahia/home

AFD is the Groupe Agence Française de Développement, a bi-lateral development finance institution established in 1941 that works on behalf of the French government.  Its mission is to finance development according to France’s Overseas Development Assistance policies.

AFD’s activities are aimed at reducing poverty and inequalities, promoting sustainable economic growth, and protecting “Global Public Goods” of benefit to all humanity. Protecting Global Public Goods includes the fight against climate change and pandemics; the preservation of biodiversity; the promotion of social and environmental responsibility; as well as aid to countries weakened by strife, war and natural disasters.  

AFD’s actions in favor of economic growth and preservation of the environment fall directly within the framework of the United Nation’s Millennium Development Goals, which was set out in 2000 and seeks to reduce global poverty by half by the year 2015.

Objectives

As a bilateral development bank and the central operator of France’s foreign aid policy, AFD’s activities on five continents are aimed at reducing poverty and inequalities, financial sustainable economic growth and protecting “Global Public Goods” of benefit to all humanity.  AFD activities fall within the framework of the United Nations’ Millennium Development Goals.

Protecting Global Public Goods includes the fight against climate change and pandemics; the preservation of biodiversity; the promotion of social and environmental responsibility; as well as aid to countries weakened by strife, war and natural disasters.
  
AFD uses a wide range of financial instruments to underwrite its funding activities: grants, subsidies, guarantees, loans, equity shareholdings, co-financing and local bank intermediation. The types of assistance AFD provides funding for includes:

  • micro, small and medium-sized enterprise funding
  • public budget support
  • infrastructure construction
  • urban and rural development
  • health and education
  • war and disaster relief
  • social cohesion and environmental responsibility
  • research and training
  • technical assistance and capacity building 

Budget

Being a public institution wholly State-owned, the Agence française de développement is also, under the Monetary and Financial French Code, a specialized financial institution subject to all the obligations of the banking regulation, in particular risk management and internal control.

It raises a significant part of its ressources on the financial markets, mainly through bonds issues, ranging from 500 million euros to 1 billion euros a year.

Links for annual financial reports: http://www.afd.fr/jahia/Jahia/lang/en/home/finances

Promotion in the Water Sector

AFD – which works in developing countries to reduce poverty by facilitating access to essential services – devotes an average of 20% of its total contributions to improving access to drinking water and sanitation.

AFD supports a wide range of activities in the sector, including: support for policies related to water supply and governance; integrated management of water resources; supply of drinking water for domestic and industrial use in rural and urban areas; domestic and industrial waste water treatment throughout the cycle (collection, treatment, and recovery of by-products); and storm water runoff treatment.

AFD’s contribution to the French government’s endeavour to double aid for the water sector is reflected in its 2009 funding goal of €290 million, half of which is earmarked for Africa. These objectives have been met for 2007.

In developing countries, €317 million has been earmarked, half for drinking water and half for sanitation, including €57 million in grants, €99 million in sovereign loans, and €161 million in non-sovereign loans. African countries are the primary target of AFD aid, receiving 57% of the total amount, accounting for €180 million in new commitments.

This funding will provide access to drinking water for about 4 million people and sanitation services for about 1.7 million in developing countries.

 

African Ministerial Council on Water (AMCOW)

http://www.amcow.org/

 

AquaFed

http://www.aquafed.org/   http://www.aquafed.org/pdf/Aquafed_Leaflet_2006-03.pdf

AquaFed® is an association set up to connect international organisations with private sector providers of water and sanitation services. It does this on the international scene, representing the operators through direct membership or through their national associations. AquaFed membership is open to all privately controlled companies irrespective of their size or location.

Objectives

1.      To provide a channel between private water and wastewater service providers and key international stakeholders.

2.      To contribute to solving the world’s water problems by working with the international community and sharing the expertise of the private operators.

3.      To promote the option of private sector participation in water and wastewater management as a solution that public authorities can choose.

Promotion in the Water Sector

Private water operators have been instrumental in helping to shape and raise

awareness of water issues around the world. Partnerships with the private sector

are one of the motors for progress and development in water and sanitation.

Until now, private water operators as a body have not been represented

at the international level. Public institutions, governments and other interested

international parties have lacked a way to communicate with the sector as

a whole, being limited to ad hoc contacts with individual companies or to third

party information.

The creation of AquaFed answers a real demand from international

organisations. It also provides private water operators around the world

with an organisation that represents them.

Through AquaFed, private service operators will be able to collaborate jointly

with other stakeholders in order to find practical solutions to water issues

facing the world: better service provision, economic development, improved

health and living conditions, poverty alleviation and climate change impacts,

to name but a few.

AquaFed currently brings together over 200 water and wastewater service

providers from more than 30 countries around the world. It is becoming

the natural representative and point of contact between the private water operators’ industry and international organisations.

 

AquaFed is an industry representative that communicates with the:

 1. United Nations

 2.World Bank and other Multilateral Financial Institutions

 3. European institutions

 4. Major NGOs

 5. Intergovernmental and international conferences

AquaFed contributes to international debates on water-related

problems. It constructively supports and offers ideas to assist

the international community in meeting these challenges.

AquaFed focuses on problems in the field by taking advantage

of members’:

 1.Practical experience and lessons learned

 2. Know-how and technology

 3. Ability to innovate

The worldwide footprint of private sector operators is often

overestimated. At the same time the significant contribution

of private sector operators to public health and sustainable

development is greatly underestimated by the international

community.

AquaFed works to close this gap by:

 1. Drafting common positions and messages

 2. Promoting industry results and performance

 3. Contributing through AquaFed members to sustainable

development and to meeting the UN Millenium Development Goals

 

 

Asian Development Group

http://www.adb.org/Water/default.asp

ADB is an international development finance institution whose mission is to help its developing member countries reduce poverty and improve the quality of life of their people.

Headquartered in Manila, and established in 1966, ADB is owned and financed by its 67 members, of which 48 are from the region and 19 are from other parts of the globe.

ADB's main partners are governments, the private sector, nongovernment organizations, development agencies, community-based organizations, and foundations.

Under Strategy 2020, a long-term strategic framework adopted in 2008, ADB will follow three complementary strategic agendas: inclusive growth, environmentally sustainable growth, and regional integration.

In pursuing its vision, ADB's main instruments comprise loans, technical assistance, grants, advice, and knowledge.

Although most lending is in the public sector - and to governments - ADB also provides direct assistance to private enterprises of developing countries through equity investments, guarantees, and loans. In addition, its triple-A credit rating helps mobilize funds for development.

Objectives 

Strategy 2020: The Long-Term Strategic Framework of the Asian Development Bank 2008-2020, approved by ADB's Board of Directors on 7 April 2008, is the paramount ADB-wide strategic framework to guide all its operations to 2020. Strategy 2020 reaffirms both ADB's vision of an Asia and Pacific free of poverty [PDF] and its mission to help developing member countries improve the living conditions and quality of life of their people.

Strategy 2020 identifies drivers of change that will be stressed in all its operations—developing the private sector, encouraging good governance, supporting gender equity, helping developing countries gain knowledge, and expanding partnerships with other development institutions the private sector, and with community-based organizations.

By 2012, 80% of ADB lending will be in five core operational areas, identified as comparative strengths of ADB:

  • Infrastructure, including transport and communications, energy, water supply and sanitation and urban development
  • Environment
  • Regional cooperation and integration
  • Finance sector development
  • Education

ADB will continue to operate in health, agriculture, and disaster and emergency assistance, but on a more selective basis.

Budget

Carrying a triple-A credit rating, ADB raises funds through bond issues on the world's capital markets. It also utilizes its members' contributions and retained earnings from lending operations. These sources comprise ADB's ordinary capital resources and account for 74.1% of lending to ADB's developing member countries.

Loans are also provided from Special Funds Resources - financed mostly from contributions of donor members for ADB's concessional loan and technical assistance programs.

How ADB's Assistance is Financed

Ordinary Capital Resources: These are a pool of funds available for ADB's lending operations, replenished by borrowings from the world's capital markets. OCR loans are offered at near-market terms to better-off borrowing countries.

Asian Development Fund: Funded by ADB's donor member countries, ADF offers loans at very low interest rates and grants that help reduce poverty in ADB's poorest borrowing countries. Read more about ADF's Impact

Technical Assistance: Assists countries in identifying and designing projects, improving institutions, formulating development strategies, or fostering regional cooperation. TA can be financed by grants, or - more rarely - loans through ADB's central budget or a number of special funds provided by ADB's donor members.

Innovation and Efficiency Initiative - Financing Instruments and Modalities: In 2005, new financing instruments and modalities were introduced under IEI. These new financing instruments are intended to provide ADB clients and operational teams with additional alternatives to help finance development projects.

Promotion in the Water Sector

“Water for All” is the Asian Development Bank’s vision and policy for the Asia and Pacific region. ADB’s Water Financing Program works to increase investments and support reforms in rural water, urban water, and river basin water.

Investing in Urban Water

If cities are the engines of a country's economic growth, then water is the oil that keeps those engines running. Common among many Asian cities, though, is the fact that water shortages and pollution are stunting growth.

Growing cities in Asia need more water supply and improved sanitation to sustain the urban economy, livelihoods, and overall quality of city life.

When cities have access to safe drinking water and sanitation, its people are healthier and more productive economically. Improved sanitation protects the poor from health risks and translates to major economic gains from tourism revenues and health care savings, among others.

ADB's Water Financing Program is doubling investments in water supply, sanitation and wastewater management, and environmental improvement in Asian cities.

Investing in Rural Water

Postcard snapshots of tranquil Asian rural scenes can be deceptive—golden harvests, stately mountains, smiling faces. Reality is much harsher, made more so by the lack of water for irrigating agricultural fields, better drainage to prevent floods, or clean drinking water and sanitation facilities in people's homes.

Governments and private-sector investors tend to give these kinds of improvements low priority, likely because of perceived low returns on investments. However, the return is huge for the individuals who are spared from dry fields, floods, hours of walking for water, and unsanitary environments around their home.

ADB's Water Financing Program 2006-2010 promotes investments in water supply and sanitation, and irrigation and drainage to improve health and livelihoods in Asia's rural communities.

Investing in Basin Water

Increased flooding upstream, more frequent droughts downstream, agricultural encroachment on wetlands, reduced agricultural production, and declining biodiversity—these are just some of the problems faced by many of Asia’s river basins.

To address these problems, governments and communities are introducing new ways of managing and sharing water resources. These include formulating the basic legal framework that determines who has the authority to manage the basin and setting up institutions—from river basin organizations to committees to water user groups—that help integrate and manage the multiple demands on the river’s resources.

ADB recognizes that Asia’s river basins need to be managed in integrated ways that promote equitable sharing of water resources while preserving the environment. It promotes investments in the infrastructure and management of water regulation and hydropower facilities, flood management, and watershed and wetlands conservation.

ADB’s Water Financing Program targets the introduction of integrated water resources management in 25 river basins across the region.

 

– March 2009   - The Federation participates in the 5th World Water Forum

AquaFed participates in the 5th World Water Forum, March 16-22 2009 in Istanbul; Turkey (http://www.worldwaterforum5.org). The theme is "Bridging Divides for Water". AquaFed is involved at various levels:

-

March 18, 2009: AquaFed Press Release: "Bridging the real water divide between haves and have-nots. More ambition, more projects, no limitations that slow progress" (English PDF; French PDF; Turkish PDF)

-

AquaFed is a member of "Business Action for Water" (BAW - http://www.businessactionforwater.org/). Initially developed and rolled-out for the UN Commission on Sustainable Development in 2004 and 2005, this renewed version of Business Action for Water aims to both represent business at the Forum and be the platform to facilitate business input.

-

AquaFed is part of the Theme 5 Finance Coordination Group and Topic Coordinator for Topic 5.1. - "Sustainable Local Finance". More information from the Virtual Meeting Space of the World Water Forum.

-

Quotes by Gérard Payen (PDF)

-

March 18, 2009: AquaFed organised Session 5.1.1. - "Financial Sustainability: Importance, progress and emerging issues."

  • Presentation by Gérard Payen: "Progress since the Camdessus Panel and the Gurria Task Force" (PDF)
  • Session 5.1.1. Final Scoping Document (PDF)
  • Preliminary Conclusions (PDF)

Asia-Pacific Water Forum

http://www.apwf.org/ 

The APWF is an independent, not-for-profit, non-partisan, non-political network. APWF will be inclusive, open and flexible, with an appropriate governance superstructure and an optimal delegation of responsibility to the contributing member organizations for the delivery of agreed products and services of high quality and practical value.

Objectives

The goal of the APWF is to contribute to sustainable water management in order to achieve the targets of the MDGs in Asia and the Pacific by capitalizing on the region's diversity and rich history of experience in dealing with water as a fundamental part of the human existence. Specifically, the APWF shall champion efforts aimed at boosting investments, building capacity, and enhancing cooperation in the water sector at the regional level and beyond.

To achieve this goal, APWF will provide countries and organizations in the Asia-Pacific region with a common platform and voice in articulating the region’s strategies and promoting its achievements in solving water problems, including meeting the necessary investment requirements. For this purpose, APWF will comprise a well-coordinated network of member organizations that are able and willing to voluntarily commit their resources in order to deliver high quality products and services that meet the priority needs of policy and decision-makers and practitioners in the water sector. APWF will add value to the ongoing work of organizations and initiatives in the water sector in terms of investment, optimizing implementation arrangements, achieving economies of scale, and developing unified approaches to water policies and programs.

Promotion in the Water Sector

The approach of the APWF's network organization will be to add value to the ongoing work of organizations and initiatives in the water sector in terms of investment, optimizing implementation arrangements, achieving economies of scale, and developing unified approaches to water policies and programs. It will be inclusive, open and flexible, with a very light governance superstructure and an optimal delegation of responsibility to the contributing member organizations for the delivery of agreed products and services of high quality and practical value.

The Regional Document prepared for the 4th World Water Forum identified three Priority Themes common across the Asia-Pacific region. Adopting strategies and initiating actions needed to address these themes will be the main focus of APWF activities leading up to the 1st Asia-Pacific Water Summit.

 

The actions required to make progress under each of the Priority Themes have been divided into five categories, or "Key Result Areas" (KRAs). APWF will provide top-quality and user-friendly network coordination services, including a first-class interactive website, to showcase activities and results in each of the KRAs and to facilitate the necessary linkages among the KRAs as they relate to the Priority Themes.

 

Consortium for Dissemination of DEWATS (CDD) 

http://www.borda-sa.org/modules/cjaycontent/index.php?id=3

BORDA was founded in 1977 as a not-for-profit organisation in Bremen, Germany. Since 1979, BORDA has been working in India with local partners to implement and disseminate sustainable solutions to the related problems of poverty and environmental degradation. Through integration of appropriate eco-friendly technology into a holistic framework including technical, social, economic and environmental components, BORDA facilitates:
- Basic need service provision to urban, peri-urban and rural populations, and
- Technical support to small and medium sized enterprises, institutions, settlements and communities.

Objectives

To improve the livelihoods of disadvantaged groups within societies and to sustain the functioning of eco-systems through dissemination of demand oriented Basic-Needs-Services in the fields of decentralized sanitation, water- and energy supply as well as solid waste- and wastewater management.

“Facilitating Basic Needs Services -
thinking long-term, acting now !”

BORDA’s mission

Conventional local and governmental water supply concepts have failed to respond to the specific needs and conditions of the target population in remote mountainous areas. Therefore, BORDA seeks to bridge this deficiency by

  • implementing demand based service provider concepts for decentralised water supply with demonstration projects
  • disseminating this approach in cooperation with various stakeholders

Promotion in the water sector

The willingness of the target group to actively participate in the project realisation is essential for the sustainability of these measures and is precondition for project implementation. In order to assure sustained access to vital resources, BORDA incorporates only environmentally friendly technologies and the utilisation of renewable energy into the technology selection process.

Portfolio

• Knowledge and Quality Management
• Decentralized Water Supply
• Decentralized Energy Supply
• Decentralized Wastewater Treatment
• Community Based Sanitation
• Decentralized Solid Waste Management


Target Regions & Donors Network

• BORDA- South Asia facilitates basic –needs service projects in 9 States of India and neighbouring regions. Projects in more States and neighbouring regions are planned.
• BORDA- South Asia and its partners have been contracted as expert organisations by the international institutions such as GTZ, AusAid, CEU, InWEnt as well as national and local Governments.
• BORDA- South Asia programs are financially supported by the Federal Republic of Germany, the Commissions of the European Union, the Free Hanseatic City of Bremen and Federal Association of Workers’ Welfare Organisations (AWO).

Co-operation Network

• BORDA-SA supports a development co-operation network that consists of 13 partner organisations employing more than 100 development experts who facilitate basic needs service projects.
• BORDA-SA Project office is responsible for the co-ordination of projects, providing strategies and solutions and knowledge and quality management and act as catalysts to integrate the partner-network in a wider national sector network to ensure the anticipated dissemination and impact of supported measures.

 

 

 

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ)

http://gtz.de/en/

The Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ) is a federally owned organisation. We work worldwide in the field of international cooperation for sustainable development. Our mandate is to support the German Government in achieving its development objectives. We provide viable, forward-looking solutions for political, economic, ecological and social development in a globalised world. Sometimes working under difficult conditions, we promote complex reforms and change processes. Our corporate objective is to improve people’s lives on a sustainable basis.   

Objectives

The GTZ works on a broad range of specialised topics. More information is available on the pages that follow in this section:

Good Governance

Democracy and rule of law, decentralisation, corruption, public finance.

Rural development 

Rural economic development, management of natural resources, land management, rural services, food security. 

Sustainable infrastructure

Energy, forward-looking construction, transport, water.

Social development

Health and population, education, HIV/AIDS, social protection

Environment and climate change

Climate change, environmental policy and institutional development, managing natural resources, urban and industrial environmental management.

Economic development and employment

Economic policy, vocational training, private sector, ICT and economy, financial systems, globalization.

Cross-sectoral themes

Gender, crisis prevention, youth, HIV/AIDS control, emergency aid, poverty, food and nutrition security, Rio+10, PPP, Social and Ecological Standards.

Promotion in the Water Sector

GTZ advises developing countries on how to manage their water resources fairly, efficiently and sustainably. With the help of our partners, we aim to reduce extreme poverty and develop structures that facilitate and encourage sustainable development.

The main areas of GTZ’s work in this field are:.

  • Advisory services for governments on shaping water policy
  • Supporting water management reform
  • Developing and improving regulation systems
  • Promoting sustainable water supply and sanitation
  • Support for transboundary water management and cooperation

For further information go to:

http://www.gtz.de/en/themen/3625.htmhttp://www.gtz.de/en/themen/8524.htm

 

DFID 

http://www.dfid.gov.uk/mdg/environment.asp

DFID is the part of the UK government that manages Britain's aid to poor countries and works to get rid of extreme poverty. As well as headquarters in London and East Kilbride, near Glasgow, DFID has offices in around 40 developing countries and provides aid to around 90 countries.

We are working to reach the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the international targets agreed by the United Nations (UN) to halve world poverty by 2015.

We work with governments of developing countries as well as charities, businesses and international bodies, including the World Bank, UN agencies and the European Commission. All our partners share our ambition to achieve the MDGs.

In 2008/09 we provided £5.5 billion of aid to poorer countries. Our budget will increase to £7.8 billion by 2010/11. By 2013, the equivalent of 0.7% of the UK’s gross national income will be dedicated to development assistance, from 0.36% in 2007/08.

Objectives

We deliver UKaid in many different ways so that it works effectively in different environments.

We continually monitor how we deliver aid so that more goes where it is needed. If we become aware of obstacles in a country, such as corruption or human rights abuses, we may stop our aid or change the way we deliver it.

Most UKaid from DFID goes to developing countries either directly or through an international body. In 2008/09, 27% went directly to governments, to spend on the priorities they set themselves for helping their citizens out of poverty.

Almost a third of UKaid goes to international bodies for their own activities in developing countries. Activities include work on healthcare, education and economic growth. The main recipients are:

  • the European Commission
  • the World Bank
  • the United Nations
  • the Global Fund to Fight Aids, TB and Malaria.

UKaid is also provided to charities. These include international charities like Oxfam, VSO and Action Aid and charities based in developing countries. Individual charities decide how to use this support, but all have audit systems in place, agreed with us, to ensure that aid is used effectively.

We also provide UKaid directly to development projects on the ground. In most cases, we work with one or more development organisations (mainly non-governmental organisations).

In response to humanitarian crises, UKaid is provided to charities and international bodies or directly to the countries affected.

But our work is about more than aid. We also aim to influence governments and organisations to work to reduce poverty.

The publication Statistics on International Development (see link below) sets out how we have worked over the last financial year to fight world poverty.

DFID works with:

 

 

Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs (DGIS)

http://www.minbuza.nl/en/home

 

European Commission (EC)

http://ec.europa.eu/index_en.htm#

The Directorate-General for the Environment is one of the more than 40 Directorates-General and services that make up the European Commission. Commonly referred to as DG Environment, the objective of the Directorate-General is to protect, preserve and improve the environment for present and future generations. To achieve this it proposes policies that ensure a high level of environmental protection in the European Union and that preserve the quality of life of EU citizens.

The DG makes sure that Member States correctly apply EU environmental law. In doing so it investigates complaints made by citizens and non-governmental organisations and can take legal action if it is deems that EU law has been infringed. In certain cases DG Environment represents the European Union in environmental matters at international meetings such as the United Nations Convention on Biodiversity.

The DG also finances projects that contribute to environmental protection in the EU. Since 1992 some 2,600 projects have received some financing from LIFE, the EU's financial instrument for the environment.

Every year the Directorate General makes public its priorities for the upcoming year and also publishes a yearly report on the preceding year's policy initiatives. 

Objectives

Improving environmental management at the European Commission

Since 2002 DG Environment and four other Commission services (OIB, DG HR, DIGIT and SG) have taken part in a pilot project to improve the Commission's environmental performance through  the implementation of an environmental management system in line with the EMAS  regulation . From 2002 to 2008, electricity and water consumption have gone down by 14 and 22% respectively. Emissions of CO2 have also decreased (7%) and so has the amount of waste generated (11%). By mid-2008 nearly half of Commission staff used public transport such as busses, trams, metro or the train. Following the positive results of this pilot phase it was decided to extend  the EMAS  system  to the whole Commission, starting in January 2010.

Promotion in the Water Sector

The European Commission works on:

  • River Basin Management
  • Marine, Environment and Coasts
  • Flood Risk Management
  • Water Scarcity and Droughts
  • Drinking Water
  • Bathing Water
  • Water Pollution
  • EU Water Initiative
  • Water and Adaptation

For further info on the programmes go to: http://ec.europa.eu/environment/water/index_en.htm

 

The global Public-Private Partnership for Handwashing with Soap (PPPHW)

http://www.globalhandwashing.org/ 

The global Public-Private Partnership for Handwashing with Soap (PPPHW) is a coalition of international stakeholders whose focus is handwashing and child health.

Established in 2001, the partnership aims to give families, schools, and communities in developing countries the power to prevent diarrhea and respiratory infections by supporting the universal promotion and practice of proper handwashing with soap at critical times.

Various global and national organizations are committed to promoting handwashing with soap on a large scale:

  • Governments that support national programs to promote handwashing.
  • Donor organizations that increasingly include handwashing in their water, sanitation, health, and education programs.
  • The private sector that brings state-of-the-art marketing know-how and techniques to the table, as well as support at the national level.
  • Academic and scientific organizations that contribute the latest behavior-change theory and scientific evidence of the effectiveness of handwashing.
  • Non-governmental and community-based organizations that aim to promote handwashing programs and integrate them into their work agenda.

Objectives

The PPPHW works explicitly to promote handwashing with soap and recognizes that hygiene, sanitation, and water are pillars of development.

The PPPHW works to make handwashing a common practice in homes, schools, and communities worldwide.

The PPPHW aims at achieving the following:

  • reduce the incidence of diarrheal diseases and respiratory infections in poor communities through promoting handwashing with soap;
  • implement large-scale handwashing interventions and use lessons to promote the approach at the global level;
  • share scientific evidence showing that handwashing with soap is an exceptionally cost-effective health intervention.

The PPPHW also seeks to promote awareness, build political commitment, and trigger action on this critical issue at local, national, and international levels.

Promotion in the Water Sector

Handwashing initiatives are currently underway in the following countries across the globe, with programs focused on promoting the practice of handwashing with soap among children, mothers, teachers and caregivers altogether.

  1. Benin
  2. Colombia
  3. Ghana
  4. Indonesia
  5. Kenya
  6. Nepal
  7. Nicaragua
  8. Peru
  9. Philippines
  10. Senegal
  11. Tanzania
  12. Uganda
  13. Vietnam

For further info on the country projects go to: http://www.globalhandwashing.org/country-work/country-pages.php

 

Global Water Systems Project

http://www.gwsp.org/

The Earth System Science Partnership of DIVERSITAS, IGBP, IHDP and WCRP recently launched a set of four Joint Projects to address research questions regarding the global aspects of environmental change impacts on water, food, carbon and human health in an integrated way.

Multiple threats, summarized under the heading of global environmental change, and interactions cause perturbations to the global water system, a system that is not well observed, understood, and, due to its complexity, has yielded limited predictability.

The Global Water System Project builds on 25 years of scientific leadership, expertise and the information database of the four global environmental change programmes to create added value results for societal benefits.

While science driven, the Joint Project on the Global Water System will provide policy-informing results, specifically targeting issues pertaining to the global aspects of environmental change that are of high interest to water managers worldwide.

GWSP research supports global assessments of water, and the development of adaptation strategies with the appropriate scientific basis and international consensus as was done for greenhouse gases. GWSP coordinates and supports a bold research agenda to understand this complex system with its interactions between natural and human components and their feedbacks.

GWSP will provide strategies for policy-informing research on human dimensions underpinned by political discourse, global observing systems, model simulations, and by delivering tailored products for water managers on all continents.

Objectives

The Global Water System Project seeks to answer the fundamental and
multi-faceted question:

How are humans changing the global water cycle, the associated biogeochemical cycles, and the biological components of the global water system and what are the social feedbacks arising from these changes?

Three major research themes follow this overarching question

I. What are the magnitudes of anthropogenic and environmental changes in the global water system and what are the key mechanisms by which they are induced?

II. What are the main linkages and feedbacks within the earth system arising from changes in the global water system?

III. How resilient and adaptable is the global water system to change, and what are sustainable water management strategies?

Promotion in the Water Sector

The Global Water System Project is currently working on these projects:

·        Global Reservoir and Dam (GRanD) Database - Project Summary, July 2008

  • The Digital Water Atlas
  • GWSP- LOICZ Collaboration
  • World Water Balance

 

For further info on current and past projects go to: http://www.gwsp.org/activities.html

 

 

International Centre for Soil Fertility and Agricultural Development

 

http://www.ifdc.org/  

IFDC is a public international organization addressing critical issues such as international food security, the alleviation of global hunger and poverty, environmental protection and the promotion of economic development and self-sufficiency. IFDC focuses on increasing productivity across the agricultural value chain in developing countries. This is achieved by the creation and transfer of effective and environmentally sound crop nutrient technology and agribusiness expertise.

IFDC is governed by an international board of directors with representation from developed and developing nations. The non-profit Center is supported by bilateral and multilateral aid agencies, private foundations and national governments. The non-profit Center was established in 1974 in response to global food and energy crises. To date, IFDC has provided assistance in nearly 100 countries.

Over the last 35 years, IFDC has focused on increasing and sustaining food security and agricultural productivity in over 130 developing countries through the development and transfer of effective and environmentally sound crop nutrient technology and agribusiness expertise.

The organization’s collaborative partnerships combine cutting-edge research and development with on-site training and education. IFDC has contributed to the development of institutional capacity building in 150 countries through more than 700 formal training programs, primarily as part of IFDC’s long-term agricultural development projects. Field demonstrations and training have assisted hundreds of thousands of farmers in developing countries.

Objectives

To increase sustainable agricultural productivity through the development and transfer of effective and environmentally sound plant nutrient technology and agricultural marketing expertise.

Key IFDC Objectives are:

Through worldwide field projects, with the backing of research:

  • To increase the efficiency of nitrogen use by 50 percent, from the current average of 30 to 45 percent to 45 to 70 percent.
  • To increase the yields of staple crops by at least 50 percent.
  • To increase farm income by 30 to 50 percent.

Through focused research efforts:

  • To make directly applied phosphate rock as effective as the more expensive water-soluble fertilizers.

For more information go to: http://www.ifdc.org/About/Strategic_Plan_%281%29

Budget

FDC funding sources include bilateral and multilateral development agencies, private enterprises, foundations and an assortment of other organizations. Additional revenue is generated from long-term, donor-funded market development projects involving the transfer of policy and technology improvements to emerging economies.

Because of these valued donors, IFDC is able to implement projects and initiatives that focus on improving the livelihoods of smallholder farmers and other members of the agricultural value chain in developing nations around the world.

Through their generous support, these donors demonstrate their commitment to the eradication of poverty and hunger, and their dedication to the sustainable advancement of developing societies around the world.

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

FDC projects focus on increasing food security and agricultural productivity in developing countries through the development and transfer of effective and environmentally sound crop nutrient technology and agribusiness expertise. The Center’s work ranges from sector studies and long-term planning to the design, implementation and management of field projects in fertilizer production; development, evaluation and use of indigenous agro-minerals; policy, market and value chain development; and natural resource management.

IFDC works closely with farmers, agri-input dealers and output traders, the private sector, local organizations and developing country institutions to achieve sustainable impacts that last long after projects end.

For more information on past and current projects go to: http://www.ifdc.org/Projects

 

Netherlands Water Partnership

http://www.nwp.nl/en/

The Netherlands Water Partnership (NWP) is a comprehensive  network that unites Dutch water expertise. The partnership, consisting of members from private companies, government, knowledge institutes and NGOs, acts as a centre of information on water expertise, policy developments and market opportunities. But NWP is more than an information source, the organisation also  initiates, coordinates and executes projects for its members, such as trade missions, exhibitions and conferences. 

 

Promotion in the Water Sector

Over 10 years already, the Netherlands Water Partnership has stimulated cooperation and synchronization of all parties that comprise the Dutch Water Sector. By offering an integral solution using nation branding, the Dutch increase their position on the world water market. NWP organises and coordinates projects and events in the Netherlands, on an EU level and in the rest of the world. 

On a national level, the NWP facilitates and stimulates:

  • Innovation Program Water Technology
  • Network Delta Technology
  • WASH
  • Human Capital Water
  • Dutch Delta Design 2012

On a European Level:

  • European Water Partnership (EWP)

On an international level NWP focuses on a select number of foreign markets, which offer considerable business/cooperation opportunities. This prioritisation is results from extensive research and is in line with the focus of the Partners for Water Program.

NWP communicates opportunities and developments, brings member organisations together, and organises and coordinates projects on these markets. These projects can be one-time trade exhibitions, seminars, or trade missions. On some markets however, a strong public private consortium is necessary with a long breath, to be permanently set foot on the ground. For these countries, the NWP coordinates so called Country Platforms: structural cooperation between  a selected number of dedicated public and private organisations focused on a single market.

For further information go to: http://www.nwp.nl/en/what_we_do/

 

Nile Basin Initiative

http://www.nilebasin.org/

The Nile Basin Initiative was created in order to achieve sustainable socio-economic development through the equitable utilization of, and benefit from, the common Nile Basin water resources.

Objectives

The key drives of the Nile Basin Initiative is to combate water shortage, poverty, environmental degradation, and climate change.

Budget

The Nile Basin Initiative is supported by contributions from the NBI countries themselves and through the generous support of several multilateral and bilateral donors. The financial mechanisms in support of the NBI are designed with several objectives in mind: to maximize riparian ownership and control of the process; to meet donor requirements for fiduciary accountability; and to provide timely and efficient administration of funds. Given the nascent nature of the cooperative Nile institutions, the magnitude of financial resources involved, the imperative for early implementation of projects, and following extensive consultation with potential donors, a Worldbank–managed, multi-donor trust fund was established as proposed by the Nile Council of Ministers as the preferred initial funding mechanism (although alternative funding mechanisms are also used). This was to allow funds to be transferred according to established disbursement and procurement procedures. The objective is the eventual transfer of the trust fund to a Nile Basin institution as program implementation progresses and a permanent institutional framework established.

Promotion in the Water Sector

The Shared Vision project (SVP) is comprised of grant based activities to foster trust and cooperation and build an enabling environment for investment.

THE SVPs includes 8 projects:

Ongoing Projects

  1. Water Resources Management Project 
  2. Regional Power Trade Project

Completed Projects

  1. Applied Training Project
  2. Confidence-Building and Stakeholder Involvement Project
  3. Shared Vision Coordination Project
  4. Socio-economic and Benefits Sharing Project
  5. Transboundary Environmental Action Project
  6. Efficient Water Use for Agriculture Project

For more info on the individual projects, go to: http://www.nilebasin.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=blogcategory&id=14&Itemid=126

 

Stockholm Environment Institute

http://www.sei.se/index.php 

SEI is an independent international research institute. We have been engaged in environment and development issues at local, national, regional and global policy levels for more than 20 years.

Objectives

We believe that scientific insights can guide us through change and should inform decision making and public policy. We also believe that local knowledge and values are crucial in building sustainable lives. Our approach is often highly collaborative, and stakeholder involvement has always been at the heart of SEI’s work. Our projects help to build capacity and strengthen institutions to equip our partners for the long-term. 

Promotion in the Water Sector

Our researchers are gathered into four thematic teams that tackle overarching issues like climate change, energy systems, vulnerability and governance, as well as specific problems such as water resources and air pollution.

SEI, among its projects on management of environmental systems, focuses on modeling carbon and water cycles.

For more information on SEI’s see link: http://sei-international.org/projects

 

Sustainable Sanitation Alliance

http://www.susana.org/   http://www.susana.org/images/documents/02-vision/en-susana-statement-version-1-2-february-2008.pdf                                  

SuSanA is not a new organisation, but rather a loose network of organisations working along the same lines, and open to others who want to join and be active in the promotion of sustainable sanitation systems. The Sustainable Sanitation Alliance invites other international, regional and local organisations to join the network, contribute ideas, and to become active members in the thematic working groups. Feedback for the advancement of the joint road map is certainly appreciated, as it is work in progress that will be continuously updated, and will include all joint activities leading towards an increased implementation of sustainable sanitation systems

 

Objectives

The overall goal of the SuSanA is to contribute to the achievement of the MDGs by promoting sanitation systems which take into consideration all aspects of sustainability.

The MDGs and the UN's "International Year of Sanitation 2008" are highly appreciated by the "Sustainable Sanitation Alliance" as they help push sanitation high up in the political agenda. The main focus of the work of the "Sustainable Sanitation Alliance" will be to promote the implementation of sustainable sanitation systems in large scale water and sanitation programmes, in line with the strategies proposed e.g. by WHO, UNDP-PEP, UNSGAB and UNESCO.

Promotion in the Water Sector

Within SuSanA several thematic working groups have been established in order to cover a variety of different sanitation aspects and to provide deliverables that underline the problems and opportunities of these aspects.

Working group 1 - capacity development

Working group 2 - costs and economics

This working group will enrich the weak data base on costs and economics - which play a key role in the selection and sustainability of sanitation systems - and develop a methodology for cost benefit analysis. >>read more

Working group 3 - renewable energies, climate change and groundwater protection

The objective of this working group is to raise general awareness for the energy potential of the sustainable sanitation approach and its prospective contribution to reduce dependence on imported or fossil energy sources. >>read more

Working group 4 - sanitation systems, technology options, hygiene and health

This working group will develop possible options on how to improve sanitation systems especially in developing countries. >>read more

Working group 5 - food security and productive sanitation systems

This working group aims to raise awareness for the reuse-oriented sustainable sanitation approach, its prospective contribution to global food security and to promote this approach on a large scale. >>read more

Working group 6 - sustainable sanitation for cities and planning

The overall aim of this working group will be to develop strategies on how cities can adopt an appropriate planning, implementation, and management process that leads towards more sustainable sanitation solutions. >>read more

Working group 7 - community, rural and school sanitation

This working group tries to raise general awareness for community and rural sanitation by creating discussion fora and enhancing networking opportunities. >>read more

Working group 8 - sustainable sanitation in emergency and reconstruction situations

The objective of this working group is to combine the knowledge from experts in the fields of sanitation with the knowledge from experts in the field of emergency response and reconstruction. >>read more

Working group 9 - sanitation as a business

The aims of this working group are to develop an open-source data base on best practises in integrated social marketing and to establish a formal network of experts in this field. >>read more

Working group 10 - public awareness and sanitation marketing

This working group aims to create global awareness of sustainable sanitation options, and on how to make them more accessible and affordable in the local and global market especially for the poor. >>read more

Working group 11 - operation and maintenance of sustainable sanitation

The main task of this working group is to discuss and disseminate relevant information related to best practice examples of operation and maintenance systems for sustainable sanitation by elaborating fact sheets, case studies, posters and other information materials. >>read more

Working group 12 - gender aspects of sustainable sanitation

This working group is going to develop a fact sheet addressing the specific needs of both men and women in sustainable sanitation so that both accept the sustainable sanitation solutions. >>read more 

For further reading see http://www.susana.org/lang-en/working-groups

 

Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency

http://www.sida.se/English/ 

Sida is a government agency of the country of Sweden with over 650 employees. Sida channels its resources through NGOs, multilateral cooperation, and the EU, among others and is interested in promoting the idea of “international development cooperation” to replace the one-sided giving indicated by the term “assistance.” Supporting over 2,000 projects in over 100 countries (over 20 of them are specially designated as target countries), Sida seeks to create partnerships with companies, popular movements, organizations, universities, and government agencies for its development projects. Sida’s geographic focus is on countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and Central and Eastern Europe.

Objectives

Sida works according to directives of the Swedish Parliament and Government to reduce poverty in the world. The overall goal of Swedish development cooperation is to contribute to making it possible for poor people to improve their living conditions. Sida's organization has three main pillars:

  • Policy, which is responsible for global dialogues and reaching consensus, knowledge development and advice, quality assurance and competence;
  • Operations, which is responsible for the implementation of the development co-operation;
  • Management, which is responsible for control and planning functions as well as service to the rest of the authority.

Budget

Sweden's development aid is funded by the people of Sweden through the taxes they pay. The government decides how much money Sida receives.

The government’s letter of appropriation sets out how much money Sida can use and how the funds should be allocated among the organisation’s various activities. Sweden’s total development aid budget for 2010 is about SEK 31,4 billion.

About SEK 16 billion of this is administered by Sida. The letter of appropriation also sets out how Sida is to carry out its work, for example, the size of budget support that a particular country should receive.

Promotion in the Water Sector

Sida’s task is to contribute to environmentally sustainable development. It is impossible to combat poverty without taking into account the natural resources and the environment that people are dependent on and on which they build their livelihood. The environment and sustainable development affect all sectors and an environmental and climate perspective should be part of all Sida’s efforts.

Important starting points for Sida’s work with environmentally sustainable development:

  • Food security – economic development and combating poverty are completely dependent on how a country deals with its environment.
  • Human health is dependent on the state of the environment and good ecosystem management. Climate changes increase the risk of spreading diseases, such as malaria.
  • Democratic systems are threatened when environmental degradation, climate change, the depletion of ecosystems and a lack of resources limit living space.
  • The depletion of ecosystems and climate changes increase both the risk of and vulnerability to natural disasters and the competition for resources. People could be forced to move within their own country or to other countries. In the long term, this could lead to an increase in the risk of armed conflicts.

Climate changes, such as the depletion of ecosystems, are already evident in many of Sweden’s partner countries and have had major consequences on people’s health and ability to support themselves. In other words, good management of the environment and natural resources is necessary to reduce poverty. Sweden is one of the countries that has worked hardest to put environmental issues on the global agenda.

Greater access to basic public services, such as energy, water, sanitation and housing, is vital in combating poverty and to economic development. This is also a foundation on which to base other human rights. Sweden and Sida have been pioneers in including issues concerning participation, sustainability and gender equality in these sectors to achieve environmentally sustainable development and tangible poverty reduction in vulnerable societies.

The starting point for Sida’s work with environmentally sustainable development is strengthening its partner countries’ own capacity and ability. Cooperation with other donors and international organizations is important, as is support to non-governmental organizations and collaboration with trade and industry and research. 

 

UNSG's Advisory Board on Water and Sanitation (UNSGAB)

http://www.unsgab.org/ 

Solving global water problems is central to eradicating poverty and achieving sustainable development. The UNSG's Advisory Board on Water and Sanitation (UNSGAB) is an independent body established in March 2004 by United Nations Secretary-General, Mr. Kofi Annan, to give him advice as well as to galvanize action on water and sanitation issues.

Chaired by His Royal Highness the Prince of the Netherlands, the Board is composed of a wide range of dignitaries, technical experts, and individuals with proven experience in providing inspiration, moving the machinery of government, as well as working with the media, the private sector and civil society.

UNSGAB Secretariat is hosted by the Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA), United Nations.

 

Objectives

The UNSG Advisory Board is an independent body to:

  • give advice to UN Secretary General;
  • give input in global dialogue process;
  • raise global awareness through mass-media, etc.;
  • influence and work on global, regional, national institutions at highest level; and
  • take its own actions towards MDGs

The Board, inter alia, focus their work on:

  • help to mobilize resources for water and sanitation towards achievement of MDGs and JPOI;
  • publicly mobilize support and advocate for actions and ensure political visibility;
  • assess progress made towards the water and sanitation goals; and
  • advocate for improving the capacity of Governments and the international system

Promotion in the Water Sector

UNSGAB recognizes that the MDG targets on water and sanitation will go unmet unless institutions and players at the regional, national, and local levels adopt new approaches. Our members are meeting in every region for dialogues to identify pressing needs, to plot out critical actions, and to commit to actions that UNSGAB, regional banks, and other stakeholders can take to increase sanitation coverage and improve water delivery. Each of these Regional Dialogues results in a joint statement of intended actions with follow-up mechanisms in place to ensure implementation.

To identify what donors can do to maximize their efforts in water and sanitation, Dialogues are also held with key international institutions such as the OECD, the EU, and the World Bank.

 

USAID Environmental Health

http://www.ehproject.org/

USAID's Environmental Health Team sponors projects and provides financial support to selected governmental and international organizations to conduct programs and research on environmental health issues. These include:

  • Hygiene Improvement Project (HIP)
  • CDC/ Safewater
  • POUZN
  • PPP Handwashing
  • WHO HWTS Network

For more info on each project see: http://www.ehproject.org/eh/projects.html

 

Water Net

http://www.waternetonline.ihe.nl/

WaterNet is a regional network of university departments and research and training institutes specialising in water. The network aims to build regional institutional and human capacity in Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) through training, education, research and outreach by harnessing the complementary strengths of member institutions in the region and elsewhere. WaterNet member institutions have expertise in various aspects of water resources management and are based in Southern and East Africa. 

The vision of WaterNet is a future in which the Southern African Development Community (SADC) has the institutional and human capacity to educate and train its own water managers, capable to contribute to the equitable sharing and sustainable utilisation of water resources for poverty alleviation, economic development (livelihood security) and environmental security.

 

The mission of WaterNet is to build the regional institutional and human capacity in Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) through training, education, research and outreach by harnessing the complementary strengths of member institutions in the region and elsewhere.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Partnership organisations